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William Shakespeare-Sonnet 130

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by

Sophie Bendrath

on 15 December 2013

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Transcript of William Shakespeare-Sonnet 130

William Shakespeare-Sonnet 130
Sonnet 130
The Author: William Shakespeare
26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616 (birth unknown)
he wrote about 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, (the authorship of some is uncertain)
Published in 1609, the Sonnets were the last of Shakespeare's non-dramatic works to be printed
Experts believe he wrote the sonnets throughout his life for private reading
Sonnet 130 explained
Purpose of the Sonnet
Sonnet 130 is a parody of the conventional love poem
There is no use of grandiose metaphor or allusion; (ex. no comparison of his love to Venus, etc.)
The ordinary beauty and humanity of his lover are important to Shakespeare in this sonnet
He uses typical love poetry metaphors against themselves -> Paradox
However, in the final couplet, Shakespeare still proclaims his love despite the girls' "simplicity"
This sonnet represents the theme of eternal love
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damask'd, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground:
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare.
by: Sophie Bendrath
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are
dun
;
If
hairs be wires
, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen
roses damask'd, red and white
,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in
the breath that from my mistress reeks
.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground:
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as
rare
As any she
belied
with false compare.
Analysis:
My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damask’d, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground:
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare.
a
b
a
b
c
d
c
d
e
f
e
f
g
g
simile
metonymy
allusion
paradox
Stanza:1
#of Physical lines: 14
#of grammatical lines:4
Rhyme scheme: Sonnet format
Meter: Iambic pentameter
Unit 1:
Shakespeare compares his lovers' physical aspects to things in nature
Unit2:
He compares her to the usual aspects of a beautiful woman
Unit 3:
even her behavior, the way she acts/behaves is less than perfect
Unit 4:
Even though all his representations of the lover make her seem ugly, he still loves her
Full transcript