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Writing Analytical Essays

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by

Caty DeWalt

on 27 January 2016

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Transcript of Writing Analytical Essays

Purpose =
To show your thinking about this work of literature at this time in your life

Audience =
Other high school students who may or may not have read the book
Where do I start?
Writing Literary Analytical Essays
Gut response = working
thesis
Thesis
= a
specific topic
+ an
attitude
Specific topic
= an
aspect of the book
+ a
concept
Concept
= a noun you can't sense through seeing, hearing, touching, tasting, or smelling
Aspect of the book
= any of the literary terms use to break a book down into smaller pieces (e.g. theme, character, setting, motif, climax, conflict, etc.)
Attitude = interpretation, evaluation, judgment, viewpoint, or opinion that involves a
concept
"Tell Me" fact-inspired OPINION
(a.k.a.
thesis
or
mini-thesis
a.k.a. topic sentence)
Passage
= what you quote from the book
integrate
enclose in quotation marks
transcribe accurately
provide the page number in parentheses
punctuate
properly
Trigger
for gut response
Context
= exposition for your passage
Situation
Speaker
Audience
Introduction (a.k.a. "Tell Me")
Book title and author
Plot summary
Characters
Concept(s)
Thesis

Body (a.k.a. "Show Me")
Mini-thesis
Context
Passage
Analysis
Explanation

Conclusion
(a.k.a. "So What?")
Thesis
revisit
Evidence
summary
Point of greater insight

"Show me" FACTS about the book
(a.k.a.
passage
+
context
)
Integrate
signal phrase + comma
signal phrase + "that" (no comma)
full sentence + colon (:)
full integration
words and phrases only - no full sentences
five words or fewer
Punctuate
end punctuation after the parentheses
pay attention to inner and outer sentences
indented quotations - More than 4 lines in the book - refer to packet
"So What?" CONNECT the dots
(a.k.a.)
analysis
+
explanation
analysis
= taking the
passage
apart and examining
smaller parts
smaller parts
=
connotations
,
motivation
, and
context
connotations
- REQUOTE words and phrases from the
passage
and discuss the implications or baggage associated with those words and phrases.
motivation
- discuss the reasons why the
speaker
says or does whatever it is that he says or does in the passage.
context
- examine anything that is significant about the
situation
,
speaker
, or
audience
.
explanation
- explain how your analysis supports your
mini-thesis
(and
thesis
).
point of greater insight
- a "thought gift" that turns the narrow beam of the "
thesis
flashlight" from the book to the world at large:
How does the thesis apply to life in general?
What change does the author want to see in the world?
mini-thesis
- what does the
evidence
in my body paragraph prove?
Red = "tell me" (e.g. How do I interpret the facts?)
Blue = "show me" (e.g. What are the facts?)
Purple = "so what" (e.g. How do the facts support or inspire my interpretation?)
Full transcript