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Rosabel's Skirt: Language Paper One: Final Exam Practice

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Paul Hanson

on 23 September 2018

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Transcript of Rosabel's Skirt: Language Paper One: Final Exam Practice

Language Paper One
Overview
Section A:
1: List four things (AO1)
2: Analyse the effects of language (AO2)
3: Analyse the effects of structure (AO2)
4: Personal, critical response (AO4)
Section B:
writing to describe or narrative (story) writing (AO5 and AO6)
The AOs
AO1: quotations and inferring meaning
AO2: analysis of methods and their effects
AO4: evaluate texts and the methods used
AO5: writing style and organisation
AO6: SPaG
This one should be an easy four marks. Concentrate and make sure you get them.

Read again the first part of the source, from lines 1 to 5.
List four things about Rosabel from this part of the source.
[4 marks]

Underline the key parts of the question.

How long should you spend on this question?
Next: Question One
Indicative Content
Students may include:
she bought a bunch of violets
she had a scone, a boiled egg and a cup of cocoa for tea
she worked in a hat shop
she had worked hard all day
she swung onto the step of the bus
she grabbed her skirt with one hand
she clung to the railing of the bus with her other hand
she wanted a dinner that was hot and strong and filling.

Give yourself a mark for any four of the above.
Question Two
Look in detail at this extract, from lines 6 to 14 of the source:

How does the writer use language here to describe Rosabel’s bus journey home?
You could include the writer’s choice of:
words and phrases
language features and techniques
sentence forms.

[8 marks]
How to spend on this?

Underline the key parts.
Read again the first part of the source from
lines 1 to 5
.
[BOX IT!]

List four things about Rosabel
from this part of the source.

[4 marks]
Six minutes (
extra time: seven and a half minutes)
.

Remember that you MUST write in FULL SENTENCES.
Question One
Question Two
Look in detail at this extract, from
lines 6 to 14 [BOX THEM!)
of the source:

How
does the writer use
language here to describe

Rosabel’s bus journey home
?
You could include the writer’s choice of:
words and phrases
language features and techniques
sentence forms.

[8 marks]
Twelve (
extra time: fifteen minutes
).
Analysing Language
'the street was
blurred
and
misty
, but
light striking on the panes
turned their
dullness
to
opal
and
silver' (contrasting adjectives)
the jewellers' shops seen through this were
fairy palaces' (metaphor)
'
she knew the bottom of her skirt and petticoat would be
coated with black,
greasy
mud' (imagery/
sense impression
)
'
sickening smell of warm humanity
– it seemed to be
oozing
out of everybody in the bus'
(sense impression)
'
everybody had the
same expression, sitting so still, staring' (sibilance)
'stifled' (emotion)
'whole row of people
on the opposite seat
seemed to resolve into one meaningless, staring face' (metaphor)
Rosabel looked out of the windows; the street was blurred and misty, but light striking on the panes turned their dullness to opal and silver, and the jewellers' shops seen through this were fairy palaces. Her feet were horribly wet, and she knew the bottom of her skirt and petticoat would be coated with black, greasy mud. There was a sickening smell of warm humanity – it seemed to be oozing out of everybody in the bus – and everybody had the same expression, sitting so still, staring in front of them. Rosabel stirred suddenly and unfastened the two top buttons of her coat… she felt almost stifled. Through her half-closed eyes, the whole row of people on the opposite seat seemed to resolve into one meaningless, staring face.
Question Three
You now need to think about the whole of the source. This text is from the beginning of a novel.

How is the text structured to interest you as a reader?
You could write about:
what the writer focuses your attention on at the beginning
how and why the writer changes this focus as the source develops
any other structural features that interest you.

[8 marks]

Remember that this is the only question where we know exactly what the words will say.
Question Three
You now need to think about the
whole of the source
. This text is from the beginning of a novel.

How is the text
STRUCTURED to INTEREST YOU
as a reader?

You could write about:
what the writer
focuses your attention on at the beginning
how and why the writer changes this focus
as the source develops
any
other structural features
that interest you.

[8 marks]
Twelve or fifteen minutes.
AO2 content may include the effect of structural features such as:
the use of Rosabel’s thoughts at the beginning of the source to establish her lower class lifestyle and to make the reader empathise with her
the shift to the contrast between the fancy shops and the conditions on the bus to help use understand her aspirations for a better life
the use of flashback/analepsis to make a distinction between her public persona and her private thoughts
the shift in tone to convey Rosabel's changing emotional state
the circular nature of the text through the motif of food to reinforce the contrast between Rosabel's life and those of her customers.
Indicative Content
Daily Task
Don't forget the daily task on Google Classroom.
Okay, you're sitting in the exam...
... and you're told to begin. What do you do first?

Check that you have the question paper and the insert.
Read the questions.
Read the text in the insert.

Visualise doing this now. Close your eyes if it helps.
Now, make it a reality!

Check that you have the question paper and the insert.
Read the questions.
Read the text in the insert.

At the corner of Oxford Circus, Rosabel bought a bunch of violets, and that was practically the reason why she had so little tea –for a scone and a boiled egg and a cup of cocoa are not sufficient after a hard day's work in a hat shop. As she swung onto the step of the bus, grabbed her skirt with one hand and clung to the railing with the other, Rosabel thought she would have sacrificed her soul for a good dinner, something hot and strong and filling.
Rosabel looked out of the windows; the street was
blurred
and
misty
, but
light striking on the panes
turned their
dullness
to
opal
and
silver
, and the jewellers' shops seen through this were
fairy palaces
. Her feet were horribly wet, and she knew the bottom of her skirt and petticoat would be
coated with black,
greasy
mud
. There was a
sickening smell of warm humanity
– it seemed to be
oozing
out of everybody in the bus – and everybody had the
same expression, sitting so still, staring
in front of them. Rosabel stirred suddenly and unfastened the two top buttons of her coat… she felt almost
stifled
. Through her half-closed eyes, the
whole row of people
on the opposite seat
seemed to resolve into one meaningless, staring face
.
contrasting adjectives
imagery
metaphor
sibilance
metaphor
sense impression
Indicative Content: students may include:
How
does the writer use
language here to describe

Rosabel’s bus journey home
?

Make your point:
The writer uses [insert language feature]...
Use short quotations
Effect: what the language makes you know, think or feel
Cross-reference/synthesise to develop your answer

Your Turn
What impression do we get of the bus journey? Summarise it quickly, so that you know you understand it.
Okay, what
language features
does the writer use to make you think this?
Underline or highlight
what you think are the
standout words or phrases
,
labelling
them as you do so.
emotion
The writer describes the bus journey using a metaphor: ‘fairy palaces’. This shows Rosabel thinks the bus is like a fairy palace. This shows it is a metaphor.

This does:
name a method accurately
use a well-selected quotation

But:
it doesn't understand the quotation and, therefore, misunderstands the effect
doesn't develop the answer at all
Level One: 'limited'
The writer uses
positive language
to describe the view from the bus on Rosabel’s journey home. The jewellers’ shops are ‘
fairy palaces
’, an
image

to suggest that the light shining on the steamed-up bus windows makes the buildings sparkle and appear dream-like and magical to Rosabel
. However,
negative language
is then used to
portray the stuffy atmosphere inside the bus
. She says the people ‘
seemed to resolve into one meaningless, staring face
’, a
metaphor

to imply that everyone looks alike and blurs into one dull, ordinary group going about their pointless, everyday lives
. In this way, the writer’s use of language
contrasts Rosabel’s imaginary world outside the bus with what her life is really like
.

It does:
offer a clearer, more developed understanding
name one more method

It doesn't:
show detailed, perceptive understanding of the language effects
the language features are still quite basic
Level Three: 'clear understanding'
The writer employs
very different language
to describe the view from the bus and
the claustrophobic, mundane atmosphere
within it. As the light catches the misty window panes, jewellers’ shops are transformed into ‘
fairy palaces
’ for Rosabel.
Metaphorically
,
these shops
symbolise
a dream-like fantasy world full of sparkle, magic and enchantment, a world that is completely unobtainable for a lower class shop girl like her
. However, the passengers inside the bus are
described collectively
as ‘
one meaningless, staring face
’,
suggesting their features are indistinguishable: they have blurred into a single anonymous being that
personifies
the hollow, pointless existence that seems to be their lives
. In the bus journey home, the writer’s
use of language contrasts the outside world of Rosabel’s hopes and dreams with the inside reality of her life
.

Importantly, look at the way the ideas and details are incorporated fluently into each sentence.
Level Four : 'detailed and perceptive'
The writer describes the jewellers’ shops that Rosabel can see through the wet bus window as ‘
fairy palaces
’.
This image shows the shops are sparkling in the light and look pretty
.
Inside the bus is different
, because the people sitting opposite her have
‘one meaningless, staring face
’. This is a
metaphor
to
tell us that all the passengers look the same and seem really bored as they travel home
.

It does:
identify a method accurately
use well-selected quotations
explain the effects of the language
synthesise (cross-reference)

It doesn't:
show developed understanding of the language effects
identify more than one language feature
Level Two: 'some understanding'

Make sure your ideas focus on the question.
Narrow in on a couple of examples (methods and quotations) you understand, rather than fancy ones you don't.
You don't need to do words and phrases, language features and sentence forms.
Don't write generic phrases like '‘it creates a picture in our heads’ or ‘it makes us feel like Rosabel feels’.
A good explanation of the effect is better than a fancy method you can't really write about.
You don't need extra paper; a shorter, more focused answer is better than a long one that adds nothing more than was achieved in the first page or so.
Reminder of the Chief Examiner's Report
The Chief Examiner's Report
Before we start, let's have a look at what the Chief Examiner said about this question last summer.
Make sure your ideas focus on the question.
Narrow in on a couple of examples (methods and quotations) you understand, rather than fancy ones you don't.
You don't need to do words and phrases, language features and sentence forms.
Don't write generic phrases like '‘it creates a picture in our heads’ or ‘it makes us feel like Rosabel feels’.
A good explanation of the effect is better than a fancy method you can't really write about.
You don't need extra paper; a shorter, more focused answer is better than a long one that adds nothing more than was achieved in the first page or so.
Summary of the Chief Examiner's Report
The Chief Examiner's Report
Let's see what the examiner had to say about last year's Q3.
Summary of the Examiner's Report
Ask yourself: Why is this part here? How does it add to my understanding of the whole text?
Again, understanding the effect is more important than fancy methods. Concentrate on the reasons for shifts and changes.
Writing about the beginning, middle and end is okay as a starting point but you must focus on 'why' and not just 'what'.
Offer a summary of the structure before analysing it in detail.
Try to evaluate the writer's choices for the highest marks.
The main tip is that the 'why' it has been structured like this and not the 'what' is the structure that is most important.
Possible key questions move from the what, to how and on to why. They could include:
1. When I first start to read the text, what is the writer focusing my attention on?
2. How is this being developed?
3. What feature of structure is evident at this point?
4. Why might the writer have deliberately chosen to begin the text with this focus and therefore make use of this particular feature of structure?
5. What main points of focus does the writer develop in sequence after the starting point?
6. How is each being developed?
7. Why is the writer taking me through this particular sequence?
8. How is this specific to helping me relate to the intended meaning(s) at these points?
9. What does the writer focus my attention on at the end of the text?
10. How is this developed as a structural feature?
11. How am I left thinking or feeling at the end?
12. Why might the writer have sought to bring me to this point of interest/understanding?
The text begins with Rosabel so we know she’s the main character in the story, and we learn what she had for tea. Then she goes home on the bus and remembers serving ‘a girl with beautiful red hair’.

This does:
focus on elements of the structure
use a quotation
it tries to explain an effect

But:
it's too descriptive
it doesn't refer to a structural method
it's not developed
Level One: 'limited'
The writer
focuses on Rosabel’s thoughts at the beginning
of the text, saying she would have
‘sacrificed her soul for a good dinner’
,
so right from the start we understand that the main character in the story is hungry and we feel sorry for her.
Then
the focus shifts to Rosabel’s bus journey home
, and then goes back in time when she remembers that day at work and serving
‘a girl with beautiful red hair’
who is rich.

It does:
identify a method accurately
use well-selected quotations
explain the effect of one element of the structure
synthesise (cross-reference)

It doesn't:
always explain the effect of the choice of structure
develop
Level Two: 'some understanding'
At the
beginning the writer focuses our attention on the thoughts of Rosabel
, who is travelling home ‘
after a hard day's work in a hat shop’
. We learn that she would have
‘sacrificed her soul for a good dinner’
, so
this immediately establishes the main character as a lower class girl who is poor and hungry, despite how hard she works.
We then
shift in time as Rosabel experiences a flashback
to
‘all that had happened during the day’
, with
the focus narrowing to her serving a

‘girl with beautiful red hair’
. In
the final line
of their exchange, the girl tells her boyfriend she is going to wear her new hat when
‘I come out to lunch with you’
.
This reminds us of the beginning when Rosabel was hungry, so the structure emphasises how very different the two girls are.

It does:
offer a clearer, more developed understanding of the structure
name one more method
use a number of well-selected quotations
It doesn't:
show detailed, perceptive understanding of the structure
Level Three: 'clear understanding'
At the beginning the writer uses narrative voice to focus on the private thoughts of Rosabel
who is travelling home
‘after a hard day's work in a hat shop’
.
Her social situation is immediately established
as we learn she would have
‘sacrificed her soul for a good dinner’
:
she is poor, hungry and lower class.
Time is then used as a structural feature
as Rosabel experiences a
flashback
to
‘all that had happened during the day’
, and
the focus narrows as she reflects specifically on serving
a
‘girl with beautiful red hair’
. The
rest of the text involves the reader in the directness of their exchange through dialogue
, and
we witness Rosabel’s public persona of a subservient shop girl in real time
.
Rosabel’s external actions in this section, together with her earlier, more private, internal thoughts
,
now provide the reader with a fully rounded character.
In
the final line, the red-haired girl tells her boyfriend she is going to wear her new hat
when
‘I come out to lunch with you,’
which takes us back to the beginning when Rosabel could not afford a decent meal.
This
circular structure

manipulates the reader into favouring Rosabel, and possibly disliking the red-haired girl for her privilege and wealth.

Note how the quotations are incorporated into the sentences, just like Q2.
Level Four : 'detailed and perceptive'
Full transcript