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The Flowering of Romanticism

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Camilla Ignacio

on 18 February 2011

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Transcript of The Flowering of Romanticism

The Flowering of Romanticism
(1798 - 1832) Authors Music
Events Literature William Blake The origin of the word “romantic” came from 1798 Germany. It was first used by Friedrich and August von Schlegel who were critics of the time. German writers like Johann Cristoph Friedrich von Schiller and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe were among the first to write in the romantic literary style. Romanticism was in many ways a rebellion against Neoclassicism. Neoclassical writers emphasized reason, traditionalism, order, and society over the individual. Romantic writers, on the other hand, believed in emotion and were influenced by the ideals of the American and French Revolution like equality and freedom, as well as by a strong desire for change. These writers saw the dreadful conditions in Britain at the time, such as the poverty level and terrible conditions the working class suffered, and this moved them to search for truth and beauty in nature. The Romantics found the individual’s relationship to nature very important. Lyric poems became the most popular form of literature among the romantic poets.
William Blake began demonstrating elements of romanticism even before the romantic era officially began. His publishing started in the 1780s and its subject matter included mystical verse complete with engravings created by him.
Other poets of that time were Robert Burns and Sir Walter Scott, who drew literary inspiration from their Scottish heritage.
The Romantic Period officially began with William Wordsworth’s and Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s publication “Lyrical Ballads with a Few Other Poems”, which concentrated on the natural and supernatural aspects of the human experience.
William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey made up a group called the “Lake poets”.
Another popular form of literature during the Romantic Era was the personal essay, which highlighted experiences and emotions. Some famous essayists included Thomas De Quincey, Charles Lamb and William Hazlitt. William Wordsworth Samuel Taylor Coleridge Jane Austen Lord Byron, George Gordon Percy Bysshe Sheley John Keats William Blake Robert Burns (1772 – 1834)

Went to school at Cambridge
Teach and Journalist
Married Sara Fricker
Poems
Had a moral collapse, which turn down his prospects in poetry
Weekly paper called “The Friend” (1809)

Published Christabel and Kubla khan (1860) and critiques and theological and politicosociological works. (1775 – 1817)
Born in Steveton, Hampshire, England.
Later lived in Bath, Southampton, Chawton, and Winchester.
Published Novels.
Sense and Sensibility (1811)
Pride and Prejudice (1813)
Mansfield Park (1814)
Emma (1815)
(novels published anonymously)
Died at 42 (1788 – 1824)
Poor to rich.
Inheriated his great uncle’s title
Hours of Idleness (unsuccessful)
Childe Carold’s Pilgrimage (VERY successful)
Travel to Spain, Malta, Albania, Greece, and Aegean because he was disappointed in his work.
Married Anne Isabella Milbanke.
Seperatred from wife, travel to Europe and met Percy Bysshe Sheley (1792 – 1822).
Died of malaria at the age of 36 in Missolonghi.
Don Juan (1819 – 1824) one of his greatest works2 years in Vince Born in Field Place, West Sussex, England
School – Oxford (EXPELLED), because of Phamplet , the Nessescity of Atheism (1811)
Married – Harriet West Brook
Moved to Scotland
Published Queen Mad.
Developed a relationship with William Godwin’s daughter, Mary.
Hariett commited suicide, then he married mary and raised a family together.
They then moved to Italy in (1818 and traveled throughout the country.
Shelley then met Lord Byron. Greatest works includes edes, lyrics, and verse dramas, notable Prometheus Unbound (1818-1819). Shelly drowned in the Bay of Spezia at the age of 30. (1794 – 1821)
Born in London
Educated in Enfield
Education brought him to a job as an apprentice for a surgeon and afterward a dresser and a junior house surgeon. First book – Peoms (1817)
Failure soon followed this book until 1819 when Keats began writing some of his best poetry.
Success didn’t last too long because Keats was ordered to Rome due to tuberculosis, before his death at the age of 25, Keats was coughing up blood and he had also been stopped from committing suicide. 1757 – 1827)
Married Catherine Boucher (1782)
Freelance engraver
Open a Print shop in 1784 (unsuccessful)
Went back to previous employer
Joseph Johnson – radical book seller
Johnson introduced Blake to the radical circle (the authors that knew each other)
Blake removed John Scotfield, a drunk soldier, from his garden in Felpham. Scofield afterwards claimed that Blake “damned the King and said that soldiers were all slaves”.
On Scofield’s testimony, Blake was charged with high treason and put on trial at Chichester. After Blake was acquitted of high treason he moved back to London.
An exhibition of Blake’s work at the Royal Academy in 1809 failed to attract any significant interest and he sank into obscurity.
Blake continued to produce poety, paintings, and engravings but he rarely found customers for his work.
He died in 1827 was buried in an unmarked grave at Bunhill Fields. (1759 –
Born in Alloway, Scotland
1st of 7 children.
Father – tenant farmer (homeschooled the kid)
1 year of math scool
Adventurer school (established by dad and John Murdock)
Dad died in bankruptcy in 1784
Fell in love at 15 , then wrote his first poem shortly after
1785 – fathered his first 14 children
Wife – Jean Armour
“My luve is Like a red red rose”
“auld land syne”
died from heart disease at 37 Maxwell, last son, born on the day he died
Most of his poems were written in Scots 1770- 1850
Publsihed lyrical ballads
(with Samuel Taylor Coleridge)
Married Mary Hutchinson in 1802
Had an affair with a French girl and had a daughter (in 1790)
Lyrical Ballads – volume of collected poems.
After marriage, began to write his greatest works including
The Prelude (1805)
Honors: Poet Laureate in 1843 The origin of the word “romantic” came from 1798 Germany.
It was first used by Friedrich and August von Schlegel who were critics of the time.
German writers like Johann Cristoph Friedrich von Schiller and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe were among the first to write in the romantic literary style.
Romanticism was in many ways a rebellion against Neoclassicism.
Neoclassical writers emphasized reason, traditionalism, order, and society over the individual.
Romantic writers, on the other hand, believed in emotion and were influenced by the ideals of the American and French Revolution like equality and freedom, as well as by a strong desire for change.
These writers saw the dreadful conditions in Britain at the time such as the poverty level and terrible conditions the working class suffered, and this moved them to search for truth and beauty in nature.
The Romantics found the individual’s relationship to nature very important.
Lyric poems became the most popular form of literature among the romantic poets. William Blake began demonstrating elements of romanticism even before the romantic era officially began. His publishing started in the 1780s and its subject matter included mystical verse complete with engravings created by him. Other poets of that time were Robert Burns and Sir Walter Scott, who drew literary inspiration from their Scottish heritage. The Romantic Period officially began with William Wordsworth’s and Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s publication “Lyrical Ballads with a Few Other Poems”, which concentrated on the natural and supernatural aspects of the human experience.
Works Cited
"The Flowering of Romanticism (1798-1832)." McDougal Littel Literature: British Literature. Evanston: McDougal Littel, 2008. 734-888. Print. (For events and Literature)
"Robert Burns." Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More. Academy of American Poets, 2011. Web. 12 Feb. 2011. <http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/709>. (For “Robert Burns” under Authors)
"The Romantic Age 1798-1832." Lit Cafe. Oracle ThinkQuest. Web. 10 Feb. 2011. <http://library.thinkquest.org/17500/data/bio/romantic.html?tql-iframe>. (For all authors except Robert Burns and William Blake)
Simkin, John. "William Blake : Biography." Spartacus Educational - Home Page. Web. 12 Feb. 2011. <http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/PRblake.htm>. (For “William Blake” under Authors)
The French Revolution:
The ideals: were the Liberty, Equality, and Brotherhood
During the early part of the French revolution, writers thought of it as a step towards a more civilized society.
At first, the English people were sympathetic towards the French Revolution, but as time passed and violent radicals took over, the English became more aware of their own lower class’s restlessness and social ills.
Because of the fear of anarchy Britain became more conservative and all attempts at reform were put down in spite of the awful conditions of poverty and crime as well as the lack of representation in Parliament for northern and western industrial centers and the rights denied to numerous religious groups.
At this time Britain restricted any writing or speech criticizing the government. The right to public assembly was also banned.
War with France
25-year war
started with French invasion of Netherlands in 1793
War with France: is when France invades the Netherlands in 1793
then Britain entered the war with France and that lasted for ultimately 25 years.
William Pitt (son of the William Pitt who had led Britain in the Seven Years’ War) persuaded parliament to pass the Act of Union in 1800.
Ireland would be represented in the Britain Parliament, and all the British Parliament, and all the British Isles would be joined as the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
Napoleon Bonaparte had taken over France’s government.
Britain was continuously threaten with invasion until the Britain fleet, under Horatio Nelson, destroyed the French navy at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805.
In 1812, napoleon overextended himself by invading Russia, where he lost many troops to the cold.
Meanwhile, British forces were closing in on France from the south.
After two more years of battle, Napoleon was finally captured and exile to the island of Elba, and victorious diplomats met to decide Europe’s fate at the Congress of Vienna.Napolean escaped and returned to power, but shortly thereafter met final defeat at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. "POEMS" Industrial Revolution.
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