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vce units 3 and 4 geography

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Emma Williams

on 24 November 2016

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Transcript of vce units 3 and 4 geography

What is Geography?
The study of physical features on the earth and its atmosphere, and of human activities as it affects and if affected by these.
A brand new study design
As of 2016, VCAA has released a new study design for units 1-4 Geography.
We are lucky to have two classes running in 2017. We also have two experienced teachers taking these classes- Mr Page and Miss Williams. Both teachers took the new study design last year.
The study of Geography is a structured way of exploring, analysing and understanding the characteristics of
places that make up our world.
Geographers are interested in key questions concerning places and geographic phenomena: What is there? Where is it? Why is it there? What are the effects of it being there? How is it changing
over time and how could, and should, it change in the future? How is it different from other places and phenomena?
How are places and phenomena connected?
Area of study 1: Land use change
In this area of study students select a local area and use appropriate fieldwork techniques and secondary sources to investigate the processes and impacts of land use change. This change may have recently occurred, is underway or is planned for the near future.

Outcome 1
On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse, describe and explain land use change and assess its impacts.

Assessment tasks (SACs)
Structured questions (approximately 50–60 minutes)
and
Fieldwork report (approximately 1500–2000 words).
Unit 3: Changing the land
This unit focuses on two investigations of geographical change: change to land cover and change to land use. Land cover includes biomes such as forest, grassland, tundra and wetlands, as well as land covered by ice and water.
Land cover is the natural state of the biophysical environment developed over time as a result of the interconnection between climate, soils, landforms and flora and fauna and, increasingly, interconnections with human activity.
Natural land cover has been altered by many processes such as geomorphological events, plant succession and climate change. People have modified land cover to produce a range of land uses to satisfy needs such as housing, resource provision, communication, recreation and so on.
Students investigate three major processes that are changing land cover in many regions of the world:
• deforestation
• desertification, and
• melting glaciers and ice sheets.
Students investigate the distribution and causes of these three processes. They select one location for each of the three processes to develop a greater understanding of the changes to land cover produced by these processes, the impacts of these changes and responses to these changes at different scales.
At a local scale students investigate land use change using appropriate fieldwork techniques and secondary
sources. They investigate the scale of change, the reasons for change and the impacts of change.
Students undertake fieldwork and produce a fieldwork report.
Unit 4: Human population – trends and
issues
In this unit students investigate the geography of human populations. They explore the patterns of population change, movement and distribution, and how governments, organisations and individuals have responded to those
changes in different parts of the world.
In this unit, students study population dynamics before undertaking an investigation into two significant population trends arising in different parts of the world. They examine the dynamics of populations and their economic, social, political and environmental impacts on people and places.
The growth of the world’s population from 2.5 billion in 1950 to over 7 billion since 2010 has been on a scale without parallel in human history. Much of the current growth is occurring within developing countries while the populations in many developed countries are either growing slowly or are declining.
Populations change by growth and decline in fertility and mortality, and by people moving to different places.
The Demographic Transition Model and population structure diagrams provide frameworks for investigating the key dynamics of population. Population movements such as voluntary and forced movements over long or short terms add further complexity to population structures and to economic, social, political and environmental conditions. Many factors influence population change, including the impact of government policies, economic conditions, wars and revolution, political boundary changes and hazard events.
So if President Obama is correct
and Geography
is more than just memorising countries...what is it?
vce units 3 and 4 geography
Area of study 2: Land cover change
In this area of study students undertake an overview of global land cover and changes that have occurred over time.
They investigate three major processes that are changing land cover: deforestation, desertification and melting glaciers and ice sheets. They analyse these processes, explain their impacts on land cover and discuss responses to these land cover changes at three different locations in the world – one location for each process. They also evaluate three different global responses to the impacts of land cover change, one global response for each process.

Outcome 2
On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse, describe and explain processes that result in changes to land cover and discuss the impacts and responses resulting from these changes.

Assessment tasks (SAC)
Analysis of geographic data (approximately 50–60
minutes).
Key knowledge
• the spatial distribution of global land cover
• the spatial distribution of land cover on a global scale that was evident during the last Glacial Maximum around
20,000 years ago and the Holocene Climatic Optimum around 8000 years ago
• the distribution of each of the three processes on a global scale
• the nature of deforestation, desertification and melting glaciers and ice sheets as processes
• the role and interconnection of natural processes and human activity in causing deforestation, desertification
and melting glaciers and ice sheets
• for each of the selected three locations:
– its location within the global distribution of the relevant process
– reasons for current land cover changes
– impacts of these changes on the environment, economic activity and social conditions
– the use of spatial technologies to assess and manage land cover change
– a response to the impacts of these changes at each of local and national scales
• a global response to the impacts of land cover change resulting from each of the processes of deforestation,
desertification and melting glaciers and ice sheets.
Key knowledge and skills
Key skills
• analyse maps, data and other geographic information to develop descriptions and explanations
• collect, sort, process and represent data and other information
• interpret and analyse maps and other geographical data and information
• identify and describe the spatial distribution of the world’s land cover
• compare the spatial distributions of the world’s land cover over time
• describe and explain the processes and causes of deforestation, desertification and melting glaciers and ice
sheets
• describe and explain the changes to land cover that have occurred as a result of deforestation, desertification
and melting glaciers and ice sheets, and the impacts of the changes to land cover
• explain the significance of the changes to land cover
• apply appropriate criteria to evaluate the effectiveness or likely effectiveness of responses to the impacts of
these changes.
Key knowledge
• the location of the selected area, current land use and other natural and human geographic characteristics
• the interconnection of the selected area with its surrounding region
• for the selected land use, the:
– processes of change, including the nature, scale and time sequence of change
– reason/s for change considering the influence of geographical characteristics of the selected area and
surrounding region and the influence of individuals, organisations and planning strategies
– positive and negative impacts of the change on the environment, and economic and social conditions in the
selected area and surrounding region.
• the use of spatial technologies to assess and manage changes in land use
Key knowledge and skills
Key skills
• analyse maps, data and other geographic information to develop descriptions and explanations
• collect, sort, process and represent data and other information
• interpret and analyse maps and other geographical data and information
• identify and describe the geographic characteristics of the selected area
• identify and describe the change in land use in the selected area at spatial and temporal scales
• explain the processes of change, the reasons for change and the resulting land use change in the selected area
• explain and assess positive and negative impacts on the selected area and the surrounding region resulting
from land use changes
Area of study 1: Population dynamics
In this area of study students undertake an overview of world population distribution and growth before investigating the dynamics of population change over time and space. Through the study of population dynamics students investigate growth and decline in fertility and mortality, together with population movements. Students study forced and voluntary, and internal and external, population movements and how they can be long term or short term.
The study is supported with examples from within and between countries with different economic and political
conditions and social structures that illustrate the dynamics of population. Students develop understanding of the Demographic Transition Model and its applications, and the Malthusian theory of population.

Outcome 1
On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse, describe and explain population dynamics on a
global scale.

Assessment task (SAC)
Analysis of geographic data (approximately 50–60
minutes).
Area of study 2: Population issues and challenges
In this area of study students undertake investigations into two significant population trends that have developed in different parts of the world: a growing population of one country and an ageing population of another country.
Students place these trends and resulting issues and challenges in their world regional context. Issues resulting from these population trends include, among others, meeting healthcare and social service needs. Students investigate issues arising from each population trend, the challenges that arise in coping with the issues, and their
interconnection with population dynamics. They evaluate the effectiveness of strategies in response to these issues and challenges. Strategies can be selected from government and/or non-government organisations. Comparison of strategies is undertaken within each selected country.

Outcome 2
On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse, describe and explain the nature of significant population issues and challenges in selected locations and evaluate responses.

Assessment (SAC)
Structured questions (approximately 100 minutes).
Key knowledge
• present-day world population distribution
• the distribution of world population characteristics including birth rate, death rate, infant mortality rate, fertility
rate and life expectancy
• the overview of world population growth since the 1700s and projected changes in the 21st century
• the nature of population structures as a measure of population characteristics at a point in time and over time
the five stage Demographic Transition Model and its use in interpreting population structures and other
population characteristics
• Malthusian theory and its explanation of population growth and sustainability
• the main causes of population change since the 1950s
• the types and causes of population movements and their contribution to population change
• the similarities and differences in population dynamics and population structures within and between countries
with different economic and political conditions and social structures.

Key knowledge and skills
Key skills
• analyse maps, data and other geographic information to develop descriptions and explanations
• collect, sort, process and represent data and other information
• interpret and analyse maps and other geographical data and information
• identify and describe patterns in world population distribution and characteristics, and trends in world
population growth
• assess the relevance of Malthusian theory
• identify and describe the types and causes of population change
• explain the causes of population change and sustainability
• explain similarities and differences in population dynamics and population structures within and between
locations.

Key knowledge
• for each selected country:
– the nature of population trends and resulting issues and challenges
– the location and distribution of issues and challenges
– the nature of population issues and challenges in their world regional context
– population movement as a contributing factor to structural change in population
– the interconnections between population dynamics and resulting issues and challenges
– other causes of specific issues and challenges
– the economic, social, political and environmental factors contributing to the issues’ impact on people and
places
– strategies developed in response to issues and the economic, social, political and environmental impacts
of these strategies on people and places
– the effectiveness of strategies developed in response to these issues
– the role and effectiveness of spatial technologies for the development and implementation of strategies in
response to population issues.
Key knowledge and skills
Key skills
• analyse maps, data and other geographic information to develop descriptions and explanations
• collect, sort, process and represent data and other information
• interpret and analyse maps and other geographical data and information
• describe and explain the nature and significance of population issues and challenges
• describe and explain the causes and impacts of issues and challenges
• describe and explain the responses to population issues and challenges
• use appropriate criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of strategies developed in response to specific issues
• explain the role and effectiveness of spatial technologies for the development and implementation of strategies
developed in response to population issues
• compare the effectiveness of strategies.
Assessment
Unit 3
Outcome 1: 50 marks (12.5%)
Outcome 2: 50 marks (12.5%)

Unit 4
Outcome 1: 40 marks (10%)
Outcome 2: 60 marks (15%)

Examination
Worth 50% of your grade
So what does this mean?
It means you have to try consistently for the entire year so you have decent SAC marks AND a solid understanding of all areas ready for your exam.
"So how do I do well in Geography?"
- Be able to memorise facts and statistics relating to case studies
- Keep well organised study notes for each area of study and each key knowledge and key skill point
- Be an enthusiastic and organised fieldwork participant
- Be willing to look at and consider different points of view
- Understand how humans impact nature and vice versa
- Be able to correctly analyse graphs, maps and data
- Be able to consider the "bigger picture" and see connections between people, places and things.
- Complete all homework tasks and be prepared for assessment tasks
- Use your class time effectively
- Ask for assistance when necessary
- Participate in class discussion and activities
Remember: all key knowledge and skills can be assessed on
the VCE Geography exam at the end of the year!
Full transcript