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Lesson 3: Why is the rainforest canopy a difficult place to

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Marian Otenwarder

on 24 June 2016

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Transcript of Lesson 3: Why is the rainforest canopy a difficult place to

2A-2-8
Learning Targets:
1. I can Summarize "The Wings of a Butterfly"
2. I can explain the message of "The wings of the Butterfly"
3. I can determine the meaning of new words in "The wings of a Butterfly"
4. I can compare and contrast examples of biodiversity from a story to what we have learned from informational texts.

Module 2A:Unit 3-8
Lesson 2A-2-4
I can explain how the Blue Creek rainforest is biodiverse

Lesson 2A-2-5
I can write a gist statement for a chunk of text from The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.
I can determine the meaning of new words from context in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.

Lesson 2A-2-6
I can explain Meg Lowman's process for conducting experiments in the forest
2A-2-7
Learning Targets:
I can determine the meaning of words from the context in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.

I can explain the relationship between animals and plants in the rainforest using evidence from the text.

I can synthesize what I read in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.
















Lesson 2A-2-3
1. I can explain why the canopy is a difficult place to research.
2. I can identify the skills needed by scientists in order to study the rainforest canopy.

What do the following words mean: 1. Explain 2. Identify 3. Skills




Take out your books and turn to page 9

As I read aloud, follow along silently and record any words or phrases from the text that stand out, or that you think are important, in the left column of your note-catcher. You will have five minutes after we are done reading to continue recording your thoughts.





To explain means to describe, give details, or clarify

To identify means to name, discover, or recognize

A skill is the ability to do something well, and it is gained through experience or training.

Turn and talk to your partner about what you wrote down in the left hand side of your note-catcher.




Share with your groups the evidence that you found and explain why you chose each piece of text.
we

Take out your science notebooks and split one page down the middle. Then, on the top left hand side write
words that describe the canopy
and on the top right hand side write
words that describe a rainforest scientist
Words that describe the canopy Words that describe a rainforest
scientist



For homework write a paragraph responding to the following prompt:

Share your opinion about whether or not you think it would be difficult to be a rainforest scientist. Support your opinion with at least two details from the text.



Homework 1

Homework 2
Pick four of the vocabulary words from the following list (two scientific and two academic) and find their definitions.
Explain, Identify, Opinion, Skills, Supported, Ascending, Wonder, Chatterings, "Powerhouse", Biomass, Frontier, Fearless, Skillful, Cliffs, Pioneer
I can explain how Kathryn Lasky uses language to paint a picture for the reader about biodiversity in the Blue Creek rainforest
Where is Belize in relation to other rainforests we have studied?

Where is Belize?
Is Belize located in an area of the world where you think a rainforest would be? What makes you think so?
What does it mean for an author to use language to paint a picture for the reader?
Turn to page 12 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. While reading, think about the main idea of what you read. When I am finished reading you will discuss in your groups what you thunk the main idea is.
Where is Belize?
How is Blue Creek Biodiverse?
A. Q. U. A. Chart

Already Know

Questions

Understandings

Actions
Complete an A.Q.U.A chart about the biodiversity in the Blue Creek and other rainforests the you have read about.
Now you are going to be answering some text dependent questions. This means that the questions are based on the text as well as the answers.
Discuss within your groups for 7 minutes the responses to these questions using page 12 of the text to support your answers.
This is just a discussion, do not write anything down .
Already Know
pg. 1-2
Questions
pg. 3-4
Understandings
pg. 5-6
Action
pg. 6-7
After you are finished with the discussion, you will answer the questions individually. Make sure to go back to page 12 and pull out quotes from the text to support your answers.
Text Dependent Questions
Homework
Read Pages 13-16 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World, and complete the close reading note-catcher.
Pick 2 scientific and 2 academic words from the list below and define them.
explain, determine, paint a picture, biodiverse, considered, varieties, upward, species, timeless, uncharted, teems, ceaseless, vipers, salamanders, bromeliads, decaying, vegetation, thrive, opportunistic, altered, habitats
Homework Review
Think about one key detail that seemed important from last night's reading about how difficult it is to study the the canopy of a rainforest. We are going to do a
go-around.
what is a chunk?
A chunk is a piece or a section of a whole.
What is a gist statement?
A gist statement is the main idea of a text. In other words, what the text is about.
Open your books to page 13 and follow along as I read.
Turn and talk to your partner about what you think this part of the text is mostly about.
Rainforest Canopy Cards
Read the chunk of text named on your task card. Then discuss within your groups what your chunk of text was mostly about. The vocabulary words are to help you better understand the gist. Use context clues to help you figure out what the vocabulary words mean.
What do you think it means to sketch the gist of a text?
To sketch the gist means to make a picture that shows what the chunk was mostly about without using words, just images.
Homework
Add at least three more things that you have learned, three more questions that you have, and three more things that you learned.
Choose at least two scientific and two academic vocabulary words from the following list.
sketch, match, chunk, gist statement, justify, functions, impact, recently, invincible, track, previous, viewed, emergent growth, crowns, pavilion, floor, walkway, gear, Mayan, vary, jumars, ascenders, device, descent, manually, base, accompany, tag, explore, Ormosia, fixed, project, unpracticed, securely, mosaic, negotiating, spans bank diverge, observation platform, junction, provide, maze, tangled, horizontally, influences, lianas, commuting
I can determine the meaning of new words from context in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World
Take out your KWL and discuss with your groups what you added on the previous night.
Know
Want to know
Learned
Now we are going to watch a youtube video. Listen to how these scientists conducted experiments on lizards and butterflies.
Think-Pair-Share
What did you see and hear about how these scientists conducted experiments on lizards and butterflies?
What do you think conducting means?
Conducting means to do something or perform.
What do you think the word experiment means?
The word experiment means to test or research.
What do you think the word process means?
The word process means a method, procedure or series of steps.
As I read aloud, follow along silently and pay attention to what the text tells us about Meg Lowman's process for conducting experiments in the rainforest. I will stop after each chunk of text and let you fill in your note-catcher.
Directions: In the left hand column, list the process or "steps" in just one or two words. In the right hand column, write a brief description of the purpose of each step.
Quiz-Quiz-Trade Slips
Homework
Add to your KWL at least three more bullets to each column.
Read pages 17-20 at home

Choose three academic and two scientific words to define and add to your vocabulary list.
Complete the right hand column of the note-catcher.


For the left hand column of the second part of the note-catcher, you are to look deeper and record any specific evidence from the text that addresses the two learning targets that are written under the Dive Deeper section of the note-catcher.
On the right hand side of the second part of your note-catcher you will write why each piece of evidence helps you to meet the target.
Ascending, Wonder, Chatterings, "Powerhouse", Biomass, Frontier, Fearless, Skillful, Cliffs, Pioneer
Use context clues to figure out the meaning of the words in order to place them in the correct column.
Hot Seat
Choose a vocabulary from the ones that we have looked at so far and sketch the definitions on your personal whiteboards or act out the definition of the word. The other students are to say if they agree with the interpretation that their peers have made.
Turn to page 24 in your books
Think about what is the gist of what we read.
Reread page 24 independently and think about the following question...
What is the relationship between the animals and plants of the rainforest?
Now you will reread pages 25 and 26 independently to think more about how animals and plants depend on each other in the rainforest. You will use your note-catcher to record your thinking. Make sure to use evidence from the text that shows how these creatures depend on bromeliads.
Try to determine the meaning of these words through context.

Disturbed, Fungus, Trudging, Hoist, Discarded, Fraction, Bromeliad, Hovering, Larvae, Lurk, Overlapping, Venomous, Disturbance, Rare, Lungless, Inaccessibility, Inhabitants
Synthesis
Turn to a new page in your journals and write a synthesize a response to the following prompt:

Describe the relationship between the animals and the plants and why the rainforest is important.
Homework
Choose three new academic vocabulary words and two scientific words from pages 24 to 26 and define them.
Disturbed, Fungus, Trudging, Hoist, Discarded, Fraction, Bromeliad, Hovering, Larvae, Lurk, Overlapping, Venomous, Disturbance, Rare, Lungless, Inaccessibility, Inhabitants
Vocab Words:
Within your groups, share the synthesis statement that you wrote last week for homework.
We have been learning a lot about the importance of biodiversity through informational texts. Today we will read a short story about the Tukuna people from the Amazon rainforest called "The wings of the Butterfly", to help us think about what we can learn about biodiversity from literature as well.
Remind me one more time what the word biodiversity means.
What about the word message, as in the message of the story?
Lets Have A Tea Party!
You will receive a card with a quote or phrase from the story "The Wings of the Butterfly". on your own read the quote and phrase, then make a prediction about what the message of the story might be and write your prediction in the back of the card.



Mingle
As you listen to me read aloud of "The Wings of the Butterfly" think about what this story is mostly about and consider what is the author's message. What message is the author trying to convey about biodiversity?
How was the prediction that you made about the message of the story accurate or inaccurate?
In this unit we, have been closely reading the informational text The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. Now we have also read a short story called "The Wings of the Butterfly". Even though short stories are fiction, they can still teach readers a lot about real-life places, events, and things.
Take 5 minutes to look back into the story "The Wings of the Butterfly" and locate examples of biodiversity mentioned in the story. Circle the words and phrases that you find.
Double Bubble Map
The Double Bubble Map is another way, besides a Venn Diagram, to organize your thoughts about how things are similar and different. You will use the Double Bubble map today to help you focused on identifying a specific number of similarities and differences between the examples of biodiversity mentioned in the story versus what you have learned about biodiversity from informational texts.
I want you to take out your A.Q.U.A charts. You will use the Double Bubble map to compare and contrast examples of biodiversity listed on the A.Q.U.A chart to the examples of biodiversity you identified in the story "The Wings of the Butterfly".
I can determine the main idea of the "Live online interview" providing two details two support my main idea
Full transcript