Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Use of language in advertising

No description
by

Giorgia Manno

on 13 April 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Use of language in advertising

Different types of ads
The "claim" is the verbal or print part of an ad that shows the superiority of the product that is advertised.
Claims are applied to parity products
In parity claims, "better" means "best" and "best" means "equal to."
When a product is superior, the ad will say so clearly and offer evidence of the superiority
Need to create illusion of superiority

Advertising is the best way to communicate to the customers
The use of right and effective language both in spoken and in written brings success and influences people
Connotation of words is important because different people sometimes interpret language in different ways.
The language of ads is positive but not always correct in the normal sense
Giorgia Manno
AA 2015/2016

Use of language in advertisement
What can we find in ads?
Hyperbole,
that express exaggeration
Frequent use of adjectives and adverbs
Neologisms,
e.g. Schoweppervescence
Long noun phrases
Short sentences
Ambiguity,
that can be syntactic or semantics
Weasel words,

that suggest a meaning without being specific, for example words as "help", "virtually", "like", "enriched" and so on
Use of imperatives
Euphemisms,
e.g. "B.O." that stands for "body odour"
Simple and colloquial language
Present tense or sometimes simple past
Simple vocabulary,
with exception of technical vocabulary
Alliteration,
e.g. "finger of fudge"
Rhyme,
e.g. "mean machine, the cleanest clean it's ever been
"
Syntactic parallelism,
e.g. "stay dry, stay happy"
Association,
e.g. "fresh as a mountain stream"
Humor:
this can be verbal or visual, but aims to show the product positively.
Glamorisation:
"Old" houses become charming, characterful, olde worlde or unique. . "Small" houses become compact, bijou, snug or manageable. Houses on a busy road become convenient for transport.


1. THE WEASEL CLAIM
A weasel word is a modifier that practically negates the claim that follows.
The expression "weasel word" is aptly named after the egg-eating habits of weasels.
Words or claims that appear substantial upon first look but become meaningless on analysis are weasel
2. THE UNFINISHED CLAIM
The unfinished claim is one in which the ad claims the product is better, or has more
of something, but does not finish the comparison.

3. THE "WE'RE DIFFERENT AND UNIQUE" CLAIM
This kind of claim states that there is nothing else quite like the product that is advertised.
4. THE "WATER IS WET" CLAIM
"Water is wet" claims say something about the product that is true for any brand in that product category.

5. THE "SO WHAT" CLAIM
This is the kind of claim to which the careful reader will react by saying "So What?“


The vague claim is simply not clear. The key to the vague claim is the use of words that are colorful but meaningless or emotional opinions
6. THE VAGUE CLAIM

7. THE TESTIMONIAL CLAIM
A celebrity or authority appears in an ad to lend his or her stellar qualities to the
product.
8. THE SCIENTIFIC OR STATISTICAL CLAIM

9. THE "COMPLIMENT THE CONSUMER" CLAIM
This kind of claim butters up the consumer by some form of flattery
.

10. THE RHETORICAL QUESTION CLAIM
This technique demands a response from the audience

SOURCES
http://home.olemiss.edu/~egjbp/comp/ad-claims.html
http://www.linguarama.com/ps/marketing-themed-english/the-language-of-advertising.htm
http://advertisement10.tripod.com/
Full transcript