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Determining Importance

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Arthur Libby

on 18 May 2014

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Transcript of Determining Importance

Reading Strategy: Determining Importance
Arthur Libby
May 18th, 2014
EDU 724
University of New England
Reading Strategy Demonstration

Introduction Video
Techniques
There a number of different techniques that can be used to help students determine the importance of ideas within a text. I will share four techniques that I feel would be helpful in analyzing nonfictional text.



Basic Definition of Determining Importance
Determining importance is a reading strategy that helps the reader to determine the most important ideas, facts and concepts in the text. This benefits the reader because these techniques help the reader determine what is important from what is just interesting.
Main Idea Wheel
Highlighting Highs
Two Column Notetaking
Determining Importance
Nonfiction Pyramid
Resources
Sources

Ellery, V., & Rosenboom, J. L. (2011). Sustaining strategic readers: Techniques for supporting content literacy in grades 6-12. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Guisinger, P. (n.d.). Determining Importance. Ohio Resource Center > Reading Strategies. Retrieved May 12, 2014, from http://ohiorc.org/adlit/strategy/strategy_each.aspx?id=000005#what

Middlecamp, C. (2012). Chemistry for a Sustainable Future. Chemistry in context: applying chemistry to society (7th ed., ). Dubuque: McGraw-Hill
.

Swanner, L. (2012, June 18). Reading Comprehension Strategy - Determining Importance [Video file]. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPsCEDQ3MUs

Image Citations

Ellery, V., & Rosenboom, J. L. (2011). Sustaining strategic readers: Techniques for supporting content literacy in grades 6-12. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. p. 174 - 176

Vandenneucker, W. (2011). Analysis [Photograph]. Retrieved from https://farm7.staticflickr.com/6181/6088403518_9dbf715d4d_d.jpg
Analysis by Wouter Vandenneucker, (2011) (CC BY-SA 2.0)
(Swanner, 2012,
Main Idea Wheel

Nonficiton Pyramids

Highighting Highs

Two - Column Note Taking
In most nonfiction works the section headings contain have the main idea for the section. The body of the text under a heading typically contain the supporting details and facts that build on the main idea. This technique can provide students with a framework to help identity and sort main ideas and the collaborating information.
The thing to remember with this technique is to have students keep in mind information that supports and explains the main idea.
The main idea wheel is a tool to help students Identify important ideas. This method works well for students who are visual/spatial, verbal/linguistic and interpersonal. The student uses this tool by placing the main idea in the middle of the wheel. The students then place supporting details and facts in the interior of the wheel. This task can be done individually or with a partner or group.
The nonfiction pyramid is an organizational tool to help students identify supporting ideas an details within a body of text. The basic template provides a easy to follow framework to help the reader analyze the text. This is a useful tool for visual/spatial, verbal/linquistic and logical/mathatical learners.
The basic steps in process for nonfiction, as taken from Ellery and Rosenboom (2011), includes the following steps

The first line will contain one major idea of the article or text.
The second ask students to describe a supporting detail related to that first main idea.
On the third line, students use three words to offer another main idea.
On the fourth line, students develop that main idea with four supporting details.
Students then use five words to express the author’s purpose.
On the sixth line, students share six important vocabulary words important to the topic.
On next line, students share seven words related to important reader’s aids, such as headings, images, captions, charts, and graphs.

(Ellery and Rosenboom, 2011, p. 139)
The Highlighting Highs technique focuses on having the student highlighting important information in the text. The students should selectively highlight text that contains vocabulary, critical ideas, or new and surprising facts. Students should be encouraged to highlight phrases and words and not entire sentences. Students can also use sticky notes in the reading to record questions, thoughts or ideas. Student can work with others if they share what they have selected or work together during the activity.
Example
Determining importance is a reading strategy that helps the reader to determine the most important ideas, facts and concepts in the text. This helps reading comprehension since these techniques help the reader determine what is important for what is interesting
Before we examine the four techniques I would like you to read over this brief passage from my applied chemistry classroom textbook. As you read please idenitify what you feel are the key idea and facts that support the main idea. As we proceed I will provide and example how each technique could would be used with this text.
determined by estimating the amount land, water, and sea surface) necessary to support your standard of living.
Ecological Footprint
average U.S. Citizen uses about 9.7 hectares (24 acres) to feed, clothe, transport, and give provide a dwelling
the calculations are based on the way a person lives and the available renewable resources needed to maintain the persons lifestyle
the world average in 2003 was estimated to be 2.2 hectares per person; estimated to be 2.7 per person today
EXAMPLE
EXAMPLE
EXAMPLE
Full transcript