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Where the superstitions originate

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by

Katie Wright

on 6 September 2013

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Transcript of Where the superstitions originate

Superstitions and Religion in Cuba
Where the superstitions originate
Most Cuban superstitions originate from the Santeria Religion. Superstitions are to have come from a belief not a thought or folk story.

Popular Superstitions
You have to drop some rum on the ground when you open a new bottle, to please and feed the spirits.
Throw a bucket of water out of the front door or the balcony on New Years Night to get rid of the bad spirits from the previous year.
If you see a black cat that means mischief is coming

More Superstitions
Don’t drink cold water or you w ill catch a cold.
Never say “el ultimo” on the last dink or you will die soon.
Taking a bath before you eat eggs
When a person is choking on food, you just pull on his ears and the food will pop out of his mouth.
An itch on the palm of hand means that you will soon receive some money
Quotes from the book on religion and luck
“He was salao, which is the worst form of unlucky”
“You’re with the lucky boat, stay with them”
“85 is a lucky number”
“a picture in color of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and another of the Virgin of Cobre”
Religion
The religion of Cuba is the Catholic tradition.
Much more openly practiced is Santeria.
It was brought in from Africa when slaves were brought to Cuba.
When one is introduced to Santeria they have to wear all white for an entire year.

Bibliography
http://www.havana-guide.com/cuban-superstitions.html

http://knowaboutcuba.com/2012/06/religion-in-cuba-the-current-culture-and-historical-background/

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