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BPS - INPUT - PROCESS - OUTPUT - FEEDBACK

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Emrah Acar

on 2 October 2018

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Transcript of BPS - INPUT - PROCESS - OUTPUT - FEEDBACK

INPUT
Resources
Tools
Information
People
Time
Energy
Money
Materials
PROCESS
The steps that lead to a result:

Production
Assembly
Management & skills
OUTPUT
The results that come out of the system
End product
Customer satisfaction
Employee satisfaction
FEEDBACK
Comparison of the results to the original need.
Adjustments if needed based on information
New ideas
Expertise and customer feedback
TOOLS
MATERIALS
standard drywall sheets
drywall fasteners (screws)
drywall tape (fiberglass)
drywall tape (paper)
More durable and easier to apply
drywall mud (or joint compound)
drywall finishing mud (or topping compound)
This is simply a finer-grained compound that allows for a smoother, less coarse finish
Use screws, avoid nailing drywall. Nailing is a far less effective way to fasten drywall, and they have a tendency to “pop” after some time, destroying the finish of the drywall. Not only are screws more effective, but with the right tools they are also far easier to use.
LABOR
"
To hang the 4 sheets of board will take maybe 20-30 minutes. Taping will be done in maybe 15 minutes (include mixing the compound add another 10...to be generous). First coat should also be like 20 minutes, second coat 20 minutes, final sanding will also be like 20 minutes
"
"I have about 4000 square feet of wall space (1000 square feet of floor space). How long should it take to complete the drywall process? Two workmen started taping and applying the joint compound yesterday morning; they say they'll be finished by noon today and ready to paint on Monday. Does that seem possible?"
"
If the two workers are each expert; and work smoothly together (that comes from practice); and there are no awkward curves or angles; and the walls are not more than single panel height; and there aren't too many windows or doors to cut around; and there are no/few closets or cubbies; and they aren't cutting out for electric outlets etc; and the weather cooperates by not being too humid or too cold or too hot or too dry; and all the materials are at hand; and you are amazingly lucky: No. I don't think so. However, a full crew in the best of circumstances *might* be able to hang that many square feet in such a short time"
TIME
auto loading drywall screw gun
drywall corner
drywall paint
baseboard trim
Drywall cost
calculators
http://www.buildingjournal.com/drywall-estimating.html
ASSEMBLY
Lay out the partition
2
Mark the ceiling 3 inches from one wall where the partition will abut it. From that mark, drop a plumb bob and mark the floor. Repeat at the partition's other end.

Measure the distance from each floor mark to its abutting wall. If it's not 3 inches, then that abutting wall is not plumb. Record the difference between the top and bottom measurements at each end for Step 3.

Using the marks as a guide, snap a chalk line on the floor and the ceiling. Measure the chalk lines to determine the lengths of the sole and top plates. Cut the plates.

If a doorway is planned, add 2 inches to the door's width and height to determine the dimensions of its rough opening.

Cut two jack studs 1 1/2 inches shorter than the rough opening height. Cut two header pieces 3 inches longer than the opening's width.
Mark the plates
Lay the plates face-to-face. If the walls aren't plumb, stagger the plates by the differences in the Step 1 plumb-bob measurements. Mark stud locations 15 1/4 inches from plate end, then every 16 inches.

Place header against sole plate in doorway; mark each end onto plate. Draw another line 1½ inches from the first. Draw an "X" between each pair of lines, showing king stud locations.

Remove the header. Draw parallel lines 1 1/2 inches in from the header. Draw an "O" between each pair for jack studs. Transfer the lines to the top plate.

At the first stud, draw a line across both plates. Work away from the end, drawing a line 1½ inches from the first. Repeat at each mark to indicate stud locations.

Set header against top plate between king stud locations. Transfer lines from the top plate to the header, showing where the cripple studs go.
3
Measure the studs
To find the stud length, stack two 2x4 blocks face-to-face on the floor layout line and measure up to the ceiling layout line. These blocks represent the combined thickness of the sole and top plates.

Take measurements at either end of the partition's location and at three spots in between
4
Cut the studs
Count the number of king and common studs marked on the plate and cut them all to the shortest measurement using a portable circular saw and Speed Square.

Also, cut all the cripples, including the two that lie against the king studs, to length: the length of the king stud minus the length of the jack, minus the thickness of the header
5
Assemble the Pieces
Lay all the pieces on edge and in position on the floor. Line up the ends of the studs with the marks on the sole and top plates. Line up the ends of the cripples with the top plate and header.

Follow the assembly sequence shown in the illustration at far right. Start with the components of the door opening; finish with the common studs.

Join pieces at right angles to each other first, by driving two 16d nails, side by side, through the face of one piece and into the end of the adjoining piece.

For face-to-face connections (jack studs to kings, the header pieces) use 10d nails driven every 12-16 inches in a zigzag pattern.

TIP: For a nonload-bearing wall, jack studs may be pieced together from scraps of 2x4s until they completely fill the gap between the sole plate and the bottom of the header.
6
Tilt up the Partition
When all the pieces have been nailed together, tilt the wall into position so that the face edge of the top plate lands alongside the line on the ceiling. If necessary, get someone help you raise the partition into position.

If the fit is tight, use a sledgehammer and a scrap wood "pounding block" to tap the edge of the sole plate into alignment with the chalk line on the floor. If the partition runs perpendicular to ceiling joists, drive one 16d nail through the top plate into each joist.

If the partition runs directly beneath a joist, nail into it through the top plate in every stud bay. If the top plate lands between the joists, nail it to blocking.
7
Check the Partition
for Plumb
When all the pieces have been nailed together, tilt the wall into position so that the face edge of the top plate lands alongside the line on the ceiling. If necessary, get someone help you raise the partition into position.

If the fit is tight, use a sledgehammer and a scrap wood "pounding block" to tap the edge of the sole plate into alignment with the chalk line on the floor. If the partition runs perpendicular to ceiling joists, drive one 16d nail through the top plate into each joist.

If the partition runs directly beneath a joist, nail into it through the top plate in every stud bay. If the top plate lands between the joists, nail it to blocking.
8
Secure the Partition
Fasten the sole plate (except at the door opening) by driving one 16d nail into each floor joist. If the wall sits in line with a joist, drive one 10d nail through the plate in each stud bay and into the subfloor. (On concrete slabs, drill through the sole plate and into the concrete, then drive in spring spikes, masonry screws, or masonry cut nails.)

Nail the end studs with 16d nails every 12 to 16 inches into studs or blocking of the abutting wall.

Once the wall is secured, cut the sole plate out of the door opening with a handsaw. Cut it flush with each jack stud, without sawing into the subfloor.

To resist the force of slamming doors, toenail each end of the just-cut plate under the jack studs with two 10d nails.
9
Add blocking
Fasten the sole plate (except at the door opening) by driving one 16d nail into each floor joist. If the wall sits in line with a joist, drive one 10d nail through the plate in each stud bay and into the subfloor. (On concrete slabs, drill through the sole plate and into the concrete, then drive in spring spikes, masonry screws, or masonry cut nails.)

Nail the end studs with 16d nails every 12 to 16 inches into studs or blocking of the abutting wall.

Once the wall is secured, cut the sole plate out of the door opening with a handsaw. Cut it flush with each jack stud, without sawing into the subfloor.

To resist the force of slamming doors, toenail each end of the just-cut plate under the jack studs with two 10d nails.
10
Source: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/how-to/how-to-frame-partition-wall
https://www.mymajors.com/career/drywall-installer/skills/
"Precise Drywall's customer service team members are well equipped, courteous, skilled and professional craftsmen. When contacting our customer service team you can expect:

• they will respond to your contact within the same business day
• they will listen to your needs
• they will assist in identifying your issue(s)
• they will schedule action appropriately, and
• they will maintain contact and adjust to your scope of work and
schedule changes"
drill
framing square
Manufacturers' documents
e.g. https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-6upb4OsaVmSkZqSEVMa2FuMU0
To calculate how many supplies you’ll need purchase for every 1,000 square feet you will need:

• 370 feet of joint tape
• 140 pounds of compound
• 700 screws
• 700 nails
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