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Good Argument

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by

Amy Edmonds-Frost M.S.

on 20 March 2014

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Transcript of Good Argument

1: Evaluate the
Subject Matter.
2: Make a claim.
3: Evidence
4: Acknowledge the opposing side
GOOD Argument
addressing an argument
the right way!

You TRY!
You will be given a variety of topics that need to be formatted as a strong claim.
You will need to give reasons, but they do not have to be backed up by real evidence. . . . yet!
1: Evaluate
the subject
matter.
GOOD, Appropriate,
Arguments
There are four items to address when taking on an argument. Here they are:
3: Evidence,
evidence,
evidence!
4: Acknow-ledge and refute the other side.
Here are the elements needed to address and conquer your argument. Remember, you don't want to create a "Bad" arguement and look like a fool!
2: Develop a solid "claim."
Copy this title in your notes
Copy in your notes:
A: Create a "T-Chart"
and compare.
PRO:
CON:
(for)
(against)
List ALL the
reasons here!
B: Regardless of your own emotion about the topic, choose the side that has the most support/evidence!
A claim defines your paper's goals, direction, scope, and is supported by evidence.
When you make a claim, you are arguing for a certain interpretation or understanding of your subject.
Building your claim -
a.) Make topic SPECIFIC
b.) Make it DEBATABLE
c.) Make it SIGNIFICANT
Copy in your notes
Creating a claim from a prompt
"There is much debate about video cameras in the classroom for both development of the teacher's practice and supervision of the students. Write a response that either supports or rejects the use of video taping in the classroom."
- I don't think students or teachers should be recorded .
This is clearly an opinion, not a claim!
- Students and teachers should not be video taped in the classroom because it violates privacy, intimate learning and trust.
This is specific, debatable and significant to the audience. No opinions.
Copy in your notes
Let's take it apart:
"There is much debate about video cameras in the classroom for both development of the teacher's practice and supervision of the students. Write a response that either supports or rejects the use of video taping in the classroom."
- I don't think students or teachers should be recorded .
- Students and teachers should not be video taped in the classroom because it violates privacy, intimate learning and trust.
The first statement just gives the persons opinion with the word "I " and "think."
There are reasons.
Always try to have THREE strong reasons to support your claim.
Poor
GOOD
The statement is clear and impersonal (no feelings).
Copy each "Post-it" square into your notes. . . no more complaining!
We already know how to assess evidence, now we need to make sure we practice it.
When you include a piece of evidence to back up your claim, check for A.R.A., always!!!
Adequate
Reliable
Appropriate
Make sure you state where the information you are using as evidence came from, by citing your sources.
VERBS to use when adding in evidence:
argues
asserts
claims
comments
confirms
contends
declares
denies
emphasizes
illustrates
implies
insist
note
observes
points out
reports
responds
says
suggests
thinks
writes
Leave half a page for handout of notes:
From your "Pro and Con" T-Chart, select an argument that the opposing side will bring up and prove that it is wrong (in a mature, fallacy-free way).
ex: Contrary to benefits that parents and administrators claim video surveillance will bring education, it is actually a move in the wrong direction for many reasons. (Follow with the reasons and proof it is wrong.)
Acknowledging the opponent's argument - but throwing a twist word in front to show your change in direction.
Tell the audience that the opposing claim is wrong/flawed.
Ways to address your opposition:
(Opposition) is not completely inaccurate, but . . .
Although it is often argued (this way), it is really (this way). . .
Opposing views claim. . .
Nevertheless,
. . .
However,
. . .
On the other hand,
. . .
Contrary to . . .
Opposing this, . . .

Lucky you, another handout is on its way.
Three steps to a thesis/claim:
1. Make the topic

SPECIFIC

2. Continue with a
DEBATABLE

phrase
When?
How many?
Which ones?
Exactly who?
does. . . .
does not. . . .
should. . . .
should not. . . .
highlights. . . .
ignores. . . .
. . . , proving that . . .
. . . , resulting in . . .
. . . , making us doubt. . .
. . . , because. . .
. . . , reminding us that. . .
You get a handout!
3. Explain
SIGNIFICANCE
to

the audience
Students and teachers

should not

be video taped in the classroom

because

it violates privacy, intimate learning and trust.
Full transcript