Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

ECONOMICS OF CHARLIE & THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY

No description
by

Brewer McLendon

on 18 April 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of ECONOMICS OF CHARLIE & THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY

During Contest
Before Contest
After Contest
During Contest
Supply During
Supply Before
5) Define the business type and name three risks
Willy Wonka's factory is a Sole Proprietorship because he started it by himself.
Three risks he faces:
1) Personal Liability- His personal assets and the business assets are considered the same so if it fails they can take his personal belongings.
2) Illness or Disability- If he gets sick there is no one to make important decisions
3) Difficulty obtaining finances to start the business
ECONOMICS OF CHARLIE & THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY
1) Demand Shift Graph before and during

3)
2) Demand Shift Graph during and after
3) Supply Shift before and during

6) How is the candy a medium of exchange?
Willy Wonka payed the oompa loompas in coco beans for them to work for him.
7) Three aspects that make Willy Wonka's products monopolistic
1) He is the biggest distributor of chocolate in the world
2) His ideas are completely
original and too advanced for
other companies to copy.
3)...
9)
Use Oompa Loompas
to describe "Specialization
of Labor."
Each Oompa Loompa had a special task, for example: Some worked machines, or rowed the transfer boat through the chocolate river, where as others had tasks unrelated to the factory, like giving Wonka haircuts, or even giving him therapy sessions.
14) Explain Charlie's "Opportunity Cost" when he bought the candy bar.
17) Wonka Bars cost two dollars in the U.S. Use the current "exchange rates" for exchanging into English Pounds, Euros, Japanese Yens, and Mexican Pesos. Show the base exchange rate and cost in the new currency.
8) How is Willy Wonka part of an "Oligopoly?" Explain and give examples.
19) Give three examples of how Wonka promotes "International Trade."
When Wonka's ideas and secret recipes were stolen by spies, and new candy stores opened up using his ideas, it created an Oligopoly.
Charlie made the decision to buy a candy bar, solely on the possibility of winning, where as he could have spent the money on food for his family. The Opportunity Cost was not using the money for more important things like for for his family.
At the beginning of the movie, you could see the packages of candy labeled for different cities countries all around the world. In fact, some of the kids who won the contest were from other places, like Germany.
English Pounds - 1.19
Euros - 1.45
Japanese Yen - 204.84
Mexican Peso - 26.1
2 US Dollars =
27) What phase of the business cycle would the government want the contest to take place?
Expansion cycle because people have the money to spend on candy. If it was in an economic downturn not many people would b able to afford it.
24) Demand graph for Wonka's father before and after the contest
Before
After
Time
Quantity
A
B
C
D
23) Demand curve for Charlies father
A) The robot Arm
B) Charlies father
Full transcript