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The Necklace

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by

Laura Randazzo

on 19 October 2017

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Transcript of The Necklace

The Necklace
by Guy de Maupassant
Let's begin with setting...
Brainstorm all the different places that the author uses. List as many scenes as you can recall from the story.
• Shabby
apartment
at beginning of story

• Dream-like mansion rooms of imagination

• Madame Forestier's home

• Party at the Ministry

• Post-party nighttime cab

• Attic flat

• Walk along
Champs-Elysees
Does your list have the following?
Apartment is along the Rue de Martyrs. What is a martyr?
How does this connect to the Loisels?
Fashionable street in Paris named after Elysian Fields.
Does anyone know what the Elysian Fields are/were?
That's right! The ancient Greek equivalent of Heaven.
Why is this an interesting name for this street? For this story?
In the course of the story,
how does Mathilde change?
She starts here...
...and ends up here.
spoiled brat
strong woman
She's not perfect, but she has improved, right?
Next
step:
Connect three points of Mathilde's character development to three different settings in the story.
Let's do the first one together...
Write this on a sheet of binder paper:
Though everything is tidy and serviceable in the Loisels' modest apartment, Mathilde is unhappy with the "worn" walls, "shabby" furniture, and "ugly" curtains, despite the fact that she has a cleaning girl and little to do all day besides daydream of a better life.
Now, write two sentences of analysis in which you explain and give your opinions about how this part of the story reflects Mathilde's character.
Now, let's compare:
Though everything is tidy and serviceable in the Loisels' modest apartment, Mathilde is unhappy with the "worn" walls, "shabby" furniture, and "ugly" curtains, despite the fact that she has a cleaning girl and little to do all day besides daydream of a better life. Her fixation on flaws, rather than having an appreciation for the relative ease of her life, reflects the childish ingratitude that is Mathilde's dominant character trait at the beginning of the tale. In life, children must learn lessons and, ironically, Mathilde will learn the true meaning of "shabby," "worn," and "ugly" as she becomes the physical manifestation of those very words as her tragic tale unfolds.
Your next concrete detail:
Maupassant emphasizes the drudgery of the "loathsome" work Mathilde endures to maintain the attic flat and repay the staggering debt; she carries water up endless stairs, argues with the grocer over every cent, and wears "down her pink nails on greasy casseroles and the bottoms of saucepans."
Copy this down, then write two sentences of commentary.
O.K., here's your last one...
In the final scene, Mathilde takes a rare break to stroll the Champs-Elysees, Paris' most fashionable street, where she meets her old friend Jeanne Forestier, who reveals the ironic twist of the story; the necklace that Mathilde toiled for ten years to replace was nothing more than a piece of costume jewelry.
Copy this down, then write two sentences of commentary.
Is there a volunteer who'll give us two sentences of commentary?
Write student's sentences here:
Is there a volunteer who'll give us two sentences of commentary?
Write student's sentences here:
Tonight's homework:
Using your writing notes from today's class, stitch together an 11-sentence paragraph in which you connect Mathilde's changing character to the settings of "The Necklace."
Your paragraph needs the following:
• A topic sentence (one sentence)
• Three well-developed body points (three sentences each, total of 9 sentences)
• A concluding sentence (one sentence)
Full transcript