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Speech to the Troops at Tilbury

BY SHARON AND SALMA !!
by

Sharon Nwamadi

on 4 March 2015

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Transcript of Speech to the Troops at Tilbury

History
SOAPSTone

Rhetorical Analysis
The Speech
By: Queen Elizabeth I
Speech to the Troops at Tilbury
S
peaker
The Three Appeals
My loving people,
We have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit ourselves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery; but I assure you I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people. Let tyrants fear, I have always so behaved myself that, under God, I have placed my chiefest strength and safeguard in the loyal hearts and good-will of my subjects; and therefore I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved, in
the midst and heat of the battle, to live and die amongst you all; to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust. I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too, and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain, or any prince of Europe, should dare to invade the borders of my realm; to which rather than any dishonour shall grow by me, I myself will take up arms, I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarded of every one of your virtues in the field. I know already, for your forwardness you have deserved rewards and crowns; and we do assure you in the word of a prince, they shall be duly paid you. In the meantime, my lieutenant general shall be in my stead, than whom never prince commanded a more noble or worthy subject; not doubting but by your obedience to my general, by your concord in the camp, and your valour in the field, we shall shortly have a famous victory over those enemies of my God, of my kingdom, and of my people.

SOAPSTone

A
udience
SOAPSTone

S
ubject
Rhetorical Analysis
The Three Appeals
Rhetorical Analysis
The Three Appeals
By the 1850s Queen Elizabeth I, had fallen into quite a predicament with Phillip II, King of Spain. Besides being a protestant, a religion frowned upon by the Hispanics, she had rejected the king’s proposal of marriage, and had been involved with many scuffles with the Spanish government.

Well you see, the King only proposed because his late wife Mary Queen of England also know as Mary I had previously been on the throne. Once dead in 1587, Phillip II didn’t want to sever his ties to England, so he tried to marry Mary Queen of Scots who was thought to be the rightful heir to the throne. However, Elizabeth had her killed, so he had no choice in the matter. This resulted in the formation of the Spanish Armada.

In the summer of 1588 the same year that this poem was written, Philip launched his armada hoping to pick up his fleet in Netherlands to stock up for an epic battle in English Channel. Unfortunately for him, the armada was stopped in Tilbury, Essex by the English navy known as the “Protestant Wind” at the time of the battle (due to the vicious weather).

After less than a month of fighting the Spanish retreated leaving the English with the victory. Travelling through Scotland the ships were destroyed due to the horrible weather leaving only half of the combatants to return.

Written in 1588 by Queen Elizabeth I
Questions

In your opinion, what is the most powerful line/statement made in this speech, and why?
O
ccasion
P
urpose
There is always a purpose behind every piece of literature, especially speeches. This one is no exception. The Speech to the Troops at Tilbury is a motivational speech that was eloquently given by Queen Elizabeth 1 to the English Army. The specific purpose of this speech being not only to incite bravery amongst her troops so that they were ready for battle, but to also unify the country, its people, with the kingdom, and God. Bravery and patriotism are important characteristics when it comes to fighting for your country. The general purpose of this speech was for Queen Elizabeth 1 to establish herself as a worthy sovereign for whom they should be willing to fight for. This is seen in paragraph 2- line 1: "I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too,."
T
one
The tone of this speech, as any speech before a battle would be, is loving and motivating. You can see the admiration that Queen Elizabeth 1 displays for her army during the very first line of this speech, addressing the army as: "My loving people." Furthermore it is seen in the last line of paragraph one: "...to live and die amongst you all; to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and my people, my honour and my blood even, in the dust." Queen Elizabeth 1 iterates that she is one with her people and would live and die for them. The adoration of the people to Queen Elizabeth 1 was expected and arguably required. Moreover, the tone of this speech was an authoritative one as well. Historians have said that Queen Elizabeth 1 sat high on a horse when delivering this speech, and although there is no recollection of the actual delivery, the speech is said to have a sense of authority linked to it. This again, is because Queen Elizabeth 1 was trying to prove to her army that there was nothing to fear when having a female such as her as their sovereign.
One effective rhetorical device in this speech is Queen Elizabeth 1's manipulation of diction. Provide one example of an effective word choice and discuss how this word/phrase impacts the speech.

Throughout the speech Queen Elizabeth I consistently uses repetition. Identify one instance of repetition and explain why the use of this rhetorical device is so effective.
TASK:
Arrange yourselves into 3 equal groups.
Assign an appeal to each group either logos, pathos, or ethos.
Each group will be responsible for identifying two examples from the speech
In addition to that, an explanation of at least two sentences is required answering why is this a specific appeal, and how is it effective?
The speaker in this speech is Queen Elizabeth I herself. Throughout the speech she uses first person narration in order to convey her opinion. She also works to garner empathy by immersing herself in the physical trials of war. Using the first person singular, “I,” she convinces the troops of her own bravery and strength showing them that she is to be trusted. For example: “Let tyrants fear, I have always so behaved myself that, under God, I have placed my chiefest strength and safeguard in the loyal hearts and good-will of my subjects...” She appeals to religion in which many trust in order to gain the trust of her people. Using the possessive pronoun, “my,” she reminds the troops that she is their leader and that she will fight for whatever belongs to her. For example: “...to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust.” Lastly, when she uses the first person plural, “we,” she creates a connection between her and her people implying that they are together as one. For example: “...and your valour in the field, we shall shortly have a famous victory over those enemies of my God, of my kingdom, and of my people. “
Although we already went through the occasion in history, to be brief the occasion of the speech is August 19th, 1588 prior to the battle between the English navy and the Spanish Armada on the shores of the British channel in Tilbury, Essex, England.
The audience was the troops of the English navy waiting at Tilbury. It was mainly directed to those who couldn’t gather the motivation to fight. Elizabeth I worked to incite passion into the hearts of the soldiers, in order to reassure them that they will soon by victorious. She even put herself in the shoes of a man in order to appear more stable as a ruler. For example she says, “I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too...” She did this because during those times having a woman as an authority figure was not favourable so she wanted to gain the support of her kingdom.
Pathos (heart)
My loving people,
We have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit ourselves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery; but I assure you I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people.

Ethos (hand)
Let tyrants fear, I have always so behaved myself that, under God, I have placed my chiefest strength and safeguard in the loyal hearts and good-will of my subjects; and

Pathos (heart) and/or Ethos (hand)
therefore I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live and die amongst you all;

Ethos (hand)
to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust.

Logos (head) and/or pathos (heart)
I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too, and

Pathos (heart)
think foul scorn that Parma or Spain, or any prince of Europe, should dare to invade the borders of my realm; to which rather than any dishonor shall grow by me,

Ethos (hand)
I myself will take up arms, I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarded of every one of your virtues in the field.

Logos (head)
I know already, for your forwardness you have deserved rewards and crowns; and We do assure you in the word of a prince, they shall be duly paid you. In the mean time, my lieutenant general shall be in my stead, than whom never prince commanded a more noble or worthy
subject;

Pathos (heart)
not doubting but by your obedience to my general, by your concord in the camp, and your valour in the field, we shall shortly have a famous victory over those enemies of my God, of my kingdom, and of my people.
Ethos (hand):
In our American culture, hands are raised to take oaths and handshakes, they symbolize trust and credibility.
Ethical and ethics” are derived from the word “ethos.”
Ethos comes from the Greek word for character. An ethos-driven speech is based upon the character and reputation of the author. The speaker may also refer to others who are held in high esteem and respected. The author appeals to the reader’s sense of fairness and refers to values, morals, rules, and ethics. If the audience believes the author is an honorable person who tells the truth, then they will be more likely to believe his/her argument. “

Logos (head):
Because thinking and reasoning is typically associated with our brains, we are going to use the head as a symbol of logos.
Logos comes from the Greek word for reason. A logos - driven document is based upon logic and the argument is presented in a way that most people find reasonable. Authors may present statistics, facts, or reasons for proposing their ideas or supporting the truthfulness of their beliefs.

Pathos (heart):
For our purposes, we are going to use the heart as a symbol of pathos.
The words “empathy” and “pathetic” are derived from the word “pathos.”
Pathos comes from the Greek word for emotion. A pathos-driven speech is based upon emotion and feelings. An author uses language and images to elicit an emotional response from the audience. Fear, anger, pity, pride, and love can be used to influence people to believe the truthfulness of the author’s message.

The subject of this speech was the interwar between England and Spain, known as the Anglo-Spanish war. This speech focused on Queen Elizabeth 1's duty as a queen, and the duty of the citizens as soldiers. Queen Elizabeth 1's duty as a queen was to lead her country to a successful win over Spain which, in fact, did happen. She also had the duty of proving to her people that she was a worthy leader. The duty of the English citizens as soldiers, was to fight for their country, to defend their country, and to honour their country. This speech is not only talking and referring to patriotism, but also refers to religion. The conflict with the Spanish Armada represented the height of the long struggle between Protestant England and Catholic Spain.
Full transcript