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Identity

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by

Derek Dang

on 4 May 2016

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Transcript of Identity

Araby Quotes
Eveline Quotes
"she sometimes felt herself in danger of her father's violence." p. 444

"It was hard work-a hard life-but she did not find it a wholly undesirable life." p. 444

"She remembered her father putting on her mother's bonnet to make the children laugh." p. 445

"Escape!" p. 446

"He would drown her." p. 446

"Her eyes gave no sign of love or farewell or recognition." p. 446


Eveline Collage
By: Patrick Zydziak, Joseph Nava, David Ieong, Yvette Molina, Derek Duong
Identity
Araby Collage
Literary Criticism
Thesis
By showing a different persona to the ones we love, we do not realize we are hiding our true selves until it is too late.
Araby

Moral/Philosophical Approach
The enduring truth for the narrator is that his love for Mangan's sister will fail his expectations because his desire for her is merely a vain wish for a change in himself. In the end of the story the protagonist was rewarded with self-actualization and maturity on who he truly was, but punished by realizing that Mangan's sister was just the "girl next door" and nothing more.
Eveline
"Her dress swung as she moved her body and the soft rope of her hair tossed from side to side." p. 438

"I did not know whether I would ever speak to her or not or, if I spoke to her, how could I tell her my confused adoration." p. 438

"Her name sprang to my lips at moments in strange prayers and praises which I myself did not understand."
p. 438

"All my senses seemed to desire to veil themselves and, feeling that I was about to slip from them, I pressed the palms of my hands together until they trembled, murmuring: O Love! O Love! many times" p. 439

"At night in my bedroom and by day in the classroom her image came between me and the page I strove to read." p. 439

"Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity. " p. 440
In the story, Eveline resolves not to repeat her mother's life of "commonplace sacrifices closing in final craziness" but does exactly that. Even though the reader does not know what decision Eveline made, choosing a new life with her love or an abusive one, one could assume that she will hover in a mindless repetition of an expressionless automaton and will live the life she is accustomed to. A perquisite is also self-actualization of her lack of courage to be able to escape her mother's fate.
Relationship with Plato
In Eveline and Araby, the event that connects them with Plato are their epiphanies. In Araby, the boy realizes his infatuation, and despises this newfound knowledge. In Eveline, she learned how she could not overcome her reluctance to leave her home. They both learned something about themselves, at the cost of pain and regret, much like Plato's "Allegory of the Cave." Ironically, they both learned about themselves in the darkness, while in Plato, it is in the light. This showcases the symbolism of light and dark and how the knowledge was for them.
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