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SDLC Flow Chart

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by

Greg Nolan

on 5 August 2010

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Transcript of SDLC Flow Chart

Discover Investigate Submitted
STAR Responsibility: Business Liaison (someone in the business, NOT I/S)

Purpose: To convey the high level requirements of and the business value that
will be realized by completion of this STAR. Ask yourself, "Will
anybody reading this STAR be able to understand the Good Business
Reason for investing time in this?"

Audience: The author's management, or Business Sponsor, as well as the I/S
analyst who will be assigned the task of investigating the request.
Think of it this way: Management at any level is likely to look at the
STAR first if they're looking to justify work on something. Make it
count.

When to Create One: Any time you have a need for a system change that is not a bug.

What a Good One Does: A good STAR allows anybody with some knowledge of the
functional area in question know what you're asking for and why it is
important to do. It should convey the measurable benefits of doing the
work, as well as any risks of not doing the work. Measurable typically
means $$, but it can represent time, headcount, avoidance of
regulatory fines, etc.
It is important to note that a good STAR focuses mroe on these elements
than on describing how to implement the solution. In other words, a
good STAR leaves options for the Business Analyst to consider more
than one possible solution alternative.

When Is It Done: A STAR is complete once it accomplishes what's described above,
and no more.

How do I know if I've gone too far? If you've spent more than an hour writing the
STAR, you should consider whether you're putting too much solution
detail in it. Most STARs should only take 15 minutes or so to write.

A Good Example: http://start/start/Lists/STARs/DispForm2.aspx?ID=1742&Source=http%3A%2F%2Fstart%2Fstart%2Fdefault%2Easpx Request
Investigation Responsibility: Business Liaison (someone in the business, NOT I/S)

Purpose: To convey the high level requirements of and the business value that
will be realized by completion of this STAR. Ask yourself, "Will
anybody reading this STAR be able to understand the Good Business
Reason for investing time in this?"

Audience: The author's management, or Business Sponsor, as well as the I/S
analyst who will be assigned the task of investigating the request.
Think of it this way: Management at any level is likely to look at the
STAR first if they're looking to justify work on something. Make it
count.

When to Create One: Any time you have a need for a system change that is not a bug.

What a Good One Does: A good STAR allows anybody with some knowledge of the
functional area in question know what you're asking for and why it is
important to do. It should convey the measurable benefits of doing the
work, as well as any risks of not doing the work. Measurable typically
means $$, but it can represent time, headcount, avoidance of
regulatory fines, etc.
It is important to note that a good STAR focuses mroe on these elements
than on describing how to implement the solution. In other words, a
good STAR leaves options for the Business Analyst to consider more
than one possible solution alternative.

When Is It Done: A STAR is complete once it accomplishes what's described above,
and no more.

How do I know if I've gone too far? If you've spent more than an hour writing the
STAR, you should consider whether you're putting too much solution
detail in it. Most STARs should only take 15 minutes or so to write.

A Good Example: http://start/start/Lists/STARs/DispForm2.aspx?ID=1742&Source=http%3A%2F%2Fstart%2Fstart%2Fdefault%2Easpx Design Develop Unit Test String Test Implement INCEPTION Responsibility: Business Liaison (someone in the business, NOT I/S)

Purpose: To convey the high level requirements of and the business value that
will be realized by completion of this STAR. Ask yourself, "Will
anybody reading this STAR be able to understand the Good Business
Reason for investing time in this?"

Audience: The author's management, or Business Sponsor, as well as the I/S
analyst who will be assigned the task of investigating the request.
Think of it this way: Management at any level is likely to look at the
STAR first if they're looking to justify work on something. Make it
count.

When to Create One: Any time you have a need for a system change that is not a bug.

What a Good One Does: A good STAR allows anybody with some knowledge of the
functional area in question know what you're asking for and why it is
important to do. It should convey the measurable benefits of doing the
work, as well as any risks of not doing the work. Measurable typically
means $$, but it can represent time, headcount, avoidance of
regulatory fines, etc.
It is important to note that a good STAR focuses mroe on these elements
than on describing how to implement the solution. In other words, a
good STAR leaves options for the Business Analyst to consider more
than one possible solution alternative.

When Is It Done: A STAR is complete once it accomplishes what's described above,
and no more.

How do I know if I've gone too far? If you've spent more than an hour writing the
STAR, you should consider whether you're putting too much solution
detail in it. Most STARs should only take 15 minutes or so to write.

A Good Example: http://start/start/Lists/STARs/DispForm2.aspx?ID=1742&Source=http%3A%2F%2Fstart%2Fstart%2Fdefault%2Easpx Responsibility: Business Liaison (someone in the business, NOT I/S)

Purpose: To convey the high level requirements of and the business value that
will be realized by completion of this STAR. Ask yourself, "Will
anybody reading this STAR be able to understand the Good Business
Reason for investing time in this?"

Audience: The author's management, or Business Sponsor, as well as the I/S
analyst who will be assigned the task of investigating the request.
Think of it this way: Management at any level is likely to look at the
STAR first if they're looking to justify work on something. Make it
count.

When to Create One: Any time you have a need for a system change that is not a bug.

What a Good One Does: A good STAR allows anybody with some knowledge of the
functional area in question know what you're asking for and why it is
important to do. It should convey the measurable benefits of doing the
work, as well as any risks of not doing the work. Measurable typically
means $$, but it can represent time, headcount, avoidance of
regulatory fines, etc.
It is important to note that a good STAR focuses mroe on these elements
than on describing how to implement the solution. In other words, a
good STAR leaves options for the Business Analyst to consider more
than one possible solution alternative.

When Is It Done: A STAR is complete once it accomplishes what's described above,
and no more.

How do I know if I've gone too far? If you've spent more than an hour writing the
STAR, you should consider whether you're putting too much solution
detail in it. Most STARs should only take 15 minutes or so to write.

A Good Example: http://start/start/Lists/STARs/DispForm2.aspx?ID=1742&Source=http%3A%2F%2Fstart%2Fstart%2Fdefault%2Easpx
Full transcript