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Copy of MOBILE TEACHERS' EXPERIENCES ON ALTERNATIVE LEARNING SYSTEM

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Transcript of Copy of MOBILE TEACHERS' EXPERIENCES ON ALTERNATIVE LEARNING SYSTEM

MOBILE TEACHERS' EXPERIENCES ON ALTERNATIVE LEARNING SYSTEM
IN THE DIVISION OF LAGUNA: A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY

Education For All
...on the road going to Community Learning Center.
Regular Literacy Session in the Community Learning Center
People in the community.....
ALS Setting
ALS Enrolment Procedure
ALS Community Mapping
Monitoring on ALS Center
ALS Informal Education Program
Introduction:
Literacy is a positive factor in human capacity building. It is an enabling factor, releasing people’s capacities, rather than giving deprived individuals what they do not have.

The Department of Education desires to make education accessible to out-of-school youth and adults who live in remote barangays of the country. It is in this context that the Alternative Learning System (ALS) Mobile Teacher Program was conceptualized as a timely educational intervention program.
Background of the Study
In 11th EFA Global Monitoring Report (UNESCO 2014) provides a timely update on progress that countries are making towards the global education goals that were agreed in 2000. It also makes a powerful case for placing education at the heart of the global development agenda after 2015.
In 2008, the EFA Global Monitoring Report asked if it can be made, - ‘will we make it?’ With less than two years left before 2015, the report made it clear that it cannot.
The current qualitative study was focused on the mobile teachers’ experiential perspective and community participation on Alternative Learning System towards the realization of Education For All (EFA) goal.

The investigation of the perceptions and lived experiences of the participants may tell us what they achieve and what challenges and issues in the delivery of education through Alternative Learning System to our community.

Theoretical Framework:
The study is anchored on the theory of Paulo Freire as discussed in the Non-Formal Education (NFE) Manual (2004).

The practice of non-formal education owes much to traditional learning practices, and has been further enhanced through the theory and practice of some of the great educational thinkers of the present time.
Freire (2000) used problem-posing methods to raise awareness of social issues and to stimulate action by disadvantaged groups. Using a process of problem analysis, reflection, and action, his approach to education is based on the belief that community members need to be encouraged to think critically about problems in their daily lives in order to make decisions and take action.
The flourishing garden is a wonderfully tangible product, but the sustainability of the project lies in the skills and abilities the community has gained through the process. The role of the implementer is to work with the community to facilitate the process, and non-formal education methods can be used from the initial assessment stage to the final evaluation and realization of the process and product.
Conceptual Framework
Surprised visit in ALS Center
Statement of the Problem
The qualitative phenomenological research study of mobile teachers’ experiences on Alternative Learning System sought to answer six research questions. The research questions guiding the study are:

1. What is the profile of the respondents in terms of:
1.1 Age;
1.2 Gender;
1.3 Civil Status;
1.4 Teaching Experience;
1.5 Plantilla Position;
1.6 Educational Attainment and;
1.7 Seminars and Trainings Attended?

2. What concepts do mobile teachers believe in teaching Alternative Learning System in the community?

3. How ALS enrolment policy procedure is conducted as experienced of the mobile teachers themselves?
4. What are the learning modalities used by the mobile teachers?

5. What do mobile teachers encounter pertaining to the community participation on the Alternative Learning System basic services in their assigned area?

6. What significant experiences are revealed by Mobile Teachers particularly in the delivery of ALS programs and projects in the community?
ALS Implementers in the Division of Laguna
Scope and Limitation of the Study:
This was focused on the mobile teachers’ experiences on Alternative Learning System who used to be assigned and teach in the community. It may provide more in-depth understanding of this particular phenomenon, and the results are most pertinent only to mobile teachers in the Division of Laguna.
Research Design
This phenomenological qualitative study was conducted through interviews. Data analysis was based on Creswell’s (1994) systematic process of analyzing textual data.

According to Giorgi (2009, p. 122): “What one seeks for a research interview in phenomenological research is as complete a description as possible of the experience that a participant has lived through.” The face-to-face interview is often longer is often longer and thus richer in terms of nuances and depth.
A phenomenological approach captures participant’s narrative accounts, which reflects how they interpret and express their experiences through interviews (Polit & Beck, 2004).
The phenomenological method of research used in this study to gain factual information about the mobile teachers’ experiences on Alternative Learning System.
Population and Sampling
The subject of this study involved the ALS Mobile Teachers in the Division of Laguna. A purposeful sampling method with reputational technique was used. Teddlie and Yu (2007) identified six purposeful sampling strategies commonly used to either identify a representative or typical sample or identify a sample that allowed comparison across different types of cases.
Purposeful sampling methods are often used in qualitative research studies so that the participants have experience in the phenomenon being studied. Creswell (2009) recommended selecting participants who can provide information about the phenomenon being studied.
Using purposeful sampling method with reputational technique (Teddlie & Yu, 2007) allowed the researcher to target 21 mobile teachers from different municipalities in the whole Division of Laguna. Thus, the entire population of Alternative Learning System Mobile Teachers within the division was involved. The number of population allowed the researcher for an in-depth investigation.
Research Procedure:
Permit from the Schools Division Superintendent of Laguna was secured to gather necessary data about the respondents. Each subject received general instruction, study descriptions and intent.

In-depth interviews were conducted in order to gain insight into the participants’ experiences. Open-ended questions were asked to understand how participants felt about their experiences in teaching in the community. The researcher took notes and record observations during each interview. All interviews were recorded using digital recorders.
Confidentiality was maintained by assigning each participant a coded name to be used instead of his name or her name. The data to be collected will be analyzed, interpreted, and presented in textual and tabular forms. Moreover, responses of the participants is Filipino based on the aspects presented were translated in English.
Data Analysis
Data analysis was performed following Creswell’s (1994) systematic process of analyzing textual data. These eight steps helped the researcher systematically process the qualitative data.
1. Read through all the transcriptions and jotted down notes to get the sense of the whole.

2. Picked one document and asked: What is this about? Focused on the underlying meaning.

3. Made a list or topics and clustered the similar topics together. Separated the topics into major topics, unique topics, and leftovers.
4. Developed abbreviated codes for each topic, and read through the transcript and assigned codes to appropriate segment of the transcripts.

5. Group related topics into categories, and used descriptive wording for the category names.
6. Finalized the abbreviations for the topics found in each category and alphabetized codes.

7. Group the data based on their assigned category and performed preliminary analysis.

8. No data needed to be recoded.
PRESENTATION, INTERPRETATION AND ANALYSIS OF DATA
1. Profile of the Respondents
In terms of their age, five (5) of the participants belong to the range of 25-30 years old, six (6) of the participants belong to the range of 31-35 years old, five (5) of the participants belong to the range of 36-40 years old, three (3) of the participants belong to the range of 41-45 years old and two (2) of the participants belong to the range of 46-50 years old.
Most of the participants were male with a total number of fourteen (14) and only seven (7) participants were female out of twenty one (21) participants. Majority of the participants were married with a total number of fifteen (15) and only six (6) of them were single.
In terms of their number of years in teaching, twelve (12) of the participants belong to the range of 1-5 years of teaching, five (5) of the participants belong to the range of 11-15 years of teaching and four (4) of the participants belong to the range of 6-10 years of teaching.

In terms of their plantilla position, ten (10) of the participants were belong to teacher I, six (6) of the participants were belong to teacher III and five (5) of the participants were belong to teacher II.

In terms of their educational attainment, twelve (12) of them have earned M.A. units, four (4) of the participants were B.S. Graduate, three (3) of the participants have earned Doctoral Degree units and two (2) of them have earned M.A. – Complete Academic Requirements.
2. What concepts do mobile teachers believe in teaching Alternative Learning System in the community?
Essential results showed that Eight (8) participants said that it is important to ensure that every individual in their respective assigned area have an access to basic education. Seven (7) participants believe that they must possess patience, perseverance and eagerness in dealing with the prospect ALS learners.
Four (4) participants believed that they must possess love of work. Few of them said that it also important to know the learners’ differences particularly their competency in order to address their difficulties. Some of the participants or two (2) of the participants said that it is important to build harmonious relationship with the Local Government Officials or in the Barangay Officials in order to guide and support the implementation of ALS programs in the community.
Such findings support by B. Lomborg 2004, remedying lack of education implies that each individual has sufficient exposure to learning opportunities to achieve mastery of the basic competencies.
Their responses revealed that eleven (11) of the participants said that they must be passionate and hardworking. Nine (9) of the participants said that they must be patient enough to deal with their learners. Few of them or two of them said that you must be open-minded. Mobile teacher Carla and Isko said that you should know how to communicate and coordinate with different types of people in the community.
Mobile teacher Dina said that she loves her job, it make easier for her to accomplish the objectives of ALS, and she enjoyed to perform her task with some sacrifices just to make sure that the objectives are being achieve. Eight (8) of the participants said that they must understand their learners condition and assess them properly in order to address their difficulties. Four (4) of the participants said that they should have a mastery in their lesson or being competent enough in teaching ALS in the community.
The results confirmed by C. Day 2004, states that teachers with a passion for teaching are driven by hope rather than optimism. They are hardworking, practical people who know their craft and like their pupils. They are sustained as active learners by their own sense of moral purposes to do the best they can under all circumstances, and by the sense of common purposes shared with colleagues. Their commitment is their pupils, and to the subjects and topics they teach. They understand that teaching is emotional as well as intellectual and practical work. They are not heroes and heroines but they are heroic.
Follow-up question: If they find difficult to be a mobile teacher
Their responses revealed that nineteen (19) of the participants said yes, it is difficult to be a mobile teacher. Five (5) of the participants said that it is hard to conduct community mapping in order to recruit ALS prospect learners. Three (3) of the participants said that it is hard to move one place to another or to transport in every Barangay just to ensure that the out-of-youths and adults may avail the ALS programs.
According to Tanon as cited by C. Baraldi (2013), this kind of process involves support and guidance rather than teaching; it is based on doing, side by side, and is not preceded by theory as it would be if it were taught in a school setting.
3. How ALS enrolment policy procedure is conducted as experienced of the mobile teachers themselves?
Their response implies that twenty one (21) or all of the participants said yes, ALS enrolment policy affects their performance. Multiple entries and multiple exit or otherwise known as every day is an enrolment day in ALS. Mobile teacher Adres said that anytime the learner is allowed to enroll and anytime they want to exit to the program. Of at the start, there is a big bulk of learners and as they go along until examination day, there is a big decrease in number of learners.
On the other hand, even before the ALS A&E Test they are not allowed to reject enrollees. Mobile teacher Pedro said that even the late enrollees passed the A & E Test, it is difficult for them to cope with the lesson when they go to formal school.
Aside on that policy as a mobile teacher he must have at least 75 learners’ enrollees to comply with the standard enrolment on ALS. Mobile teacher Gerald said that in implementing the minimum of 75 learners enrollees per as implementers they must consider the population of the community and also the literacy level. He said that he is assigned in a small municipality and it is hard for him to find 75 learners who can avail on the ALS program. Five (5) of the participants said that the flow of their lessons repeated when there are late enrollees in order for them to cope up to the lessons.
Their opinion about ALS enrollment policy procedure
Their responses connote that nineteen (19) of the participants said that there should be a time frame or period of enrollment or deadline of enrollment so that the learners have a chance to complete the required duration of ALS literacy learning session which is up 10 months in order for them to be prepared and competent enough to take the A&E Test.
Mobile teacher Erick and Robert said that there should be at least three months holding period on the enrollment so that they help and assess the learners depending upon on their difficulties. Three (3) of the participants said they have no choice on the enrollment policy; they are only implementing it as a part of their task.
S. A. Nath et. Al. (2011) considers that quality education cannot improve without a commitment to quality and effective performance by teachers.
4. What are the learning modalities used by the mobile teachers?
Their responses revealed that twenty one (21) of the participants said that they used face to face instruction. Sixteen (16) of the participants said that they used independent learning. Four (4) of the participants used blended learning: combination of face to face instruction and independent learning. Four (4) of the participants used computer-based instruction or eSkwela. Mobile Teacher Hanna said that she used radio-based instruction. Mobile teacher Robert said that he tried to use research-based instruction.
Follow up question: Most effective learning modalities
It can be deduced from the table that eighteen (18) of the participants said that face to face instruction is the most effective.
Three (3) of the participants believe that computer-based instruction is the most effective. But, only few districts in division have the computer laboratory to conduct the computer-based instruction.
Three (3) of the participants believe that blended learning instruction is the most effective. It is a combination of face to face instruction and independent learning. They said that if the learners failed to attend their regular learning session they will be given ALS modules where they can cope up their lesson at home.
Eventually, according to S. D. Johnson et al. 2000, face-to-face group provided a slightly more positive rating of the quality of the instructor than the online group, the reasons for this difference are not evident. It is possible that the instructor was more effective in the traditional format, although the lack of difference in the learning outcomes does not support this. Another possible explanation is that student ratings may tend to be higher when there is a personal connection between the instructor and the students, something that may not occur in an online course.
Follow up question: Most frequent learning modalities used
Essential results showed that eighteen (18) of the participants said that mostly they used face to face instruction. Six (6) of the participants said that mostly they used blended learning. They believed that a combination of face to face instruction and independent learning are much better compare to face to face instruction only.
Mobile teacher Hanna said that she used radio-based and computer-based instruction once a week. Since she has received issued laptop intended only for mobile teacher that can be used to enhance their teaching learning session in the Barangay.

5. What do mobile teachers encounter pertaining to the community participation on the Alternative Learning System basic services in their assigned area?
Essential results showed that nine (9) of the participants said that the learners were not committed in the program and absenteeism among them is the one reason why they didn’t completed the ALS program. Seven (7) of the participants said that uncooperative Barangay Officials is the reason why they can’t properly disseminate the ALS programs in their particular area.
Four (4) of the participants said that it is difficult to reach-out remote Barangays where they can conduct community mapping and recruitment for prospect ALS learners.

Three (3) of the participants said that their learners are interested in the ALS program but they tend to prioritize the source of their livelihood in order to sustain their living.
The result affirms by S. Rothman 2001, high rates of student absenteeism are believed to affect regular attenders as well, because teachers must accommodate non-attenders in the same class. It has been suggested that chronic absenteeism is not a cause of academic failure and departure from formal education, but rather one of many symptoms of alienation from school.
Follow up question: How they handle if a community is hard to encourage.
Their responses revealed that thirteen (13) of the participants said that they seek assistance in the Barangay Officials through proper coordination and attending the Barangay Session to promote the ALS program. They also look for other agency and sponsors to extend their hand in the implementation of the ALS program in their community.
Five (6) of the participants said that they conduct house to house recruitment or home visitation to those learners who have been absent in the previous ALS regular literacy learning session and lending them an ALS modules in order for them cope up for the previous lessons. Four (4) of the participants said that they conduct Informal Education or Livelihood training that suited for the resources of respective Barangay.
P. Easton ‎2003, consider that Adult and Non-formal Education (ANFE) programs offer a vital complement to primary education strategies for Education For All by providing a means of bringing literacy and basic education to unreached or hard-to-serve populations, by equipping parents for more effective support and local management of schooling, and by strengthening the local economic activities in which school leavers may become productively involved.
Follow up question: Their reasons for being hesitant to participate in ALS program
A perusal of the table reveals that fifteen (15) of the respondents said that poverty is the main reason why they are being hesitant to participate in the ALS program, they prefer to work first for their family before studying. Four (4) of them said that, they have family problems so that they cannot avail the ALS program.
Only two (2) of them said that they lack of necessary information about the benefits of the ALS program. Uncooperative Barangay Officials, political system in the local level, bullying, and character of the learners such as laziness and being not committed to participate in ALS programs are some of the other reasons for being hesitant to participate in the ALS programs.
The result confirms by J. Jordan n.d., stated that poverty in any community can lead to: Family involvement in schools problems, Learning problems, Graduation problems, Work force problems, Teaching problems, Attendance problems, School problems, Resource problems Testing problems, and Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) problems.

Follow up question: How mobile teachers adapt to the situation so that conflicts will be overcome.
The table implies that five (5) of the participants said that they conduct house to house visitation, talked to their parents and other respectful leader in their area to advocate the benefits and importance of ALS in their lives. Five (5) of the participants said that they are very eager to seek assistance in Barangay Officials to support the ALS program in their respective area.
Four (4) of the participants said that they motivate their learners by telling some ALS success stories of their past learners in order to encourage and give them a hope to continue their education in ALS.
Few of the participants said that they let the learners choose which of the ALS teaching modalities they are going to take, and giving them a chance to choose for what is the best fitted schedule in regular teaching sessions they are going to avail.
6. What significant experiences are revealed by Mobile Teachers particularly in the delivery of ALS programs and projects in the community?
As revealed in the table, nine (9) of the participants said that they satisfied and enjoy. Six (6) of the participants said that they feel great and proud to be a mobile teacher. Three (3) of the participants said that being a mobile teacher is hard and challenging.
Mobile teacher Monica said that she feels alone, when she went to the Barangay, and nobody is in the community learning center. Mobile teacher Ferdie said that he feels miserable, he saw the real picture of the community and feels that he is the only one responsible in educating them. He thinks that if there’s no mobile teacher like him, who will be the responsible for them in order to help them.
The result affirms by G. Singh 2001, stated that a teacher, who is happy with his job, plays a pivotal role in the upliftment of society. Well-adjusted and satisfied teacher can contribute a lot to the well-being of his/her pupils. Job satisfaction implies the overall adjustment to work situation. Attitude is the readiness to react towards or against some situation, person or thing in a particular manner. Teachers having favorable attitudes towards their profession are generally successful, properly adjusted and well satisfied with their job.
Follow up question: Significant and unforgettable experiences of a Mobile Teacher
It could be deduced from the table that six (6) of the participants said that they will never forget some of their learners who passed the A&E Test and finished their college or got a decent job. Four (4) of the participants said that they will never forget when they were conducting a community mapping.
Follow up question: How their experiences contribute for better delivery of ALS frontline services to the community.
It could be gleaned from the table that seven (7) of the participants said that they feel more motivated to become more productive teacher. Mobile teacher Andres said that he became well experienced in dealing with other people. Mobile teacher Carla said that she became open-minded to her learners. Mobile teacher Belen and Monica said that they became aware in different strategies on how to encourage their learners to attend in the ALS program.
Mobile teacher Dina said when she was exposed to media, it is easy for her to recruit more learners to participate into ALS program. Mobile teacher Erick said that he became an inspiration to others that drives him to do his job well. Mobile teacher Ferdie said that he learns to established proper communication and coordination to the Barangay Officials. Mobile teacher Gerald, Ken, Lance and Jaydee said that the more experiences they gain, the greater tendency for them to work productively.
According to NFE Manual Peace Corps 2004, motivated and talented teachers empower enthusiastic youth to acquire the knowledge and skills they need to achieve their goals. They supported the evolution and application of more holistic, participatory approaches.
Follow up question: If they feel challenged as a mobile teacher
The table connotes that twenty (20) of the participants said yes, being a mobile teacher is very challenging. Five (5) of the participants said that they feel joy and happiness to serve other people.
Chapter 5

SUMMARY, FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Summary :
The study was focused on the mobile teachers’ experiential perspective and community participation on Alternative Learning System towards the realization of Education for All (EFA) goal. The investigation of the perceptions and lived experiences of the participants may tell us what they achieve and what challenges and issues in the delivery of education through Alternative Learning System to our community.
The qualitative phenomenological research study of mobile teachers’ experiences on Alternative Learning System sought to answer six research questions. The research questions guiding the study are: 1. What is the profile of the respondents in terms of: 1.1 Age; 1.2 Gender; 1.3 Civil Status; 1.4 Teaching Experience; 1.5 Plantilla Position; 1.6 Educational Attainment and; 1.7 Seminars and Trainings Attended? 2. What concepts do mobile teachers believe in teaching Alternative Learning System in the community?
3. How ALS enrollment policy procedure is conducted as experienced of the mobile teachers themselves? 4. What are the learning modalities used by the mobile teachers? 5. What do mobile teachers encounter pertaining to the community participation on the Alternative Learning System basic services in their assigned area? 6. What significant experiences are revealed by Mobile Teachers particularly in the delivery of ALS programs and projects in the community?
The phenomenological method of research used in this study to gain factual information about the mobile teachers’ experiences on Alternative Learning System.
The subject of this study involved the ALS Mobile Teachers in the Division of Laguna. A purposeful sampling method with reputational technique was used. Data analysis was performed following Creswell’s (1994) systematic process of analyzing textual data.

Findings
1. Respondent’s Profile
In terms of their age, twenty-nine (29) percent of the participants belong to the range of 31-35 years old, twenty-four (24) percent of the participants belong to the range of 25-30 years old and 36-40 years old, fourteen (14) percent of the participants belong to the range of 41-45 years old and ten (10) percent of the participants belong to the range of 46-50 years old.

Most of the participants were male with a total number of fourteen (14) and only seven (7) participants were female out of twenty one (21) participants. Majority of the participants were married with a total number of fifteen (15) and only six (6) of them were single.
In terms of their number of years in teaching, twelve (12) of the participants belong to the range of 1-5 years of teaching, five (5) of the participants belong to the range of 11-15 years of teaching and four (4) of the participants belong to the range of 6-10 years of teaching.
In terms of their plantilla position, ten (10) of the participants were belong to teacher I, six (6) of the participants were belong to teacher III and five (5) of the participants were belong to teacher II.
In terms of their educational attainment, twelve (12) of them have earned M.A. units, four (4) of the participants were B.S. Graduate, three (3) of the participants have earned Doctoral Degree units and two (2) of them have earned M.A. – Complete Academic Requirements.
In terms of their ALS trainings and seminars attended, twenty (20) percent of them have attended international level, ninety (90) percent of them have attended national and district level, eighty-one (81) percent of them attended regional level, one hundred (100) percent of them have attended division level. As expected, the more number of years in teaching, the greater opportunities to attend ALS trainings and seminars.
2. What concepts do mobile teachers believe are important in teaching Alternative Learning System in the community?
Out of twenty-one (21) participants, eight (8) of them said that it is important to ensure that every individual in their respective assigned area have an access to basic education. Seven (7) of them believe that they must possess patience, perseverance and eagerness in dealing with the prospect ALS learners.
Four (4) of them believed that they must possess love of work. Few of them said that it also important to know the learners’ differences particularly their competency in order to address their difficulties. Some of the participants or two (2) of them said that it is important to build harmonious relationship with the Local Government Officials or in the Barangay Officials in order to guide and support the implementation of ALS programs in the community.
Eleven (11) of the participants said that they must be passionate and hardworking. Nine (9) of the participants said that they must be patient enough to deal with their learners. Eight (8) of the participants said that they must understand their learners condition and assess them properly in order to address their difficulties. Four (4) of the participants said that they should have a mastery in their lesson or being competent enough in teaching ALS in the community.
Nineteen (19) of the participants said yes, it is difficult to be a mobile teacher. Five (5) of the participants said that it is not hard to perform the duties and responsibilities of a mobile teacher.
3. How ALS enrolment policy procedure is conducted as experienced of the mobile teachers themselves?
Twenty one (21) or all of the participants said yes, ALS enrolment policy affects their performance. Multiple entries and multiple exit or otherwise known as every day is an enrolment day in ALS. Five (5) of the participants said that the flow of their lessons repeated when there are late enrollees in order for them to cope up to the lessons.
Nineteen (19) of the participants said that there should be a time frame or period of enrolment or deadline of enrolment so that the learners have a chance to complete the required duration of ALS literacy learning session which is up 10 months in order for them to be prepared and competent enough to take the A&E Test. Three (3) of the participants said they have no choice on the enrolment policy; they are only implementing it as a part of their task.
4. What are the learning modalities used by the mobile teachers?
Twenty one (21) of the participants said that they used face to face instruction. Sixteen (16) of the participants said that they used independent learning. Four (4) of the participants used blended learning: combination of face to face instruction and independent learning. Four (4) of the participants used computer-based instruction or eSkwela. Mobile Teacher Hanna said that she used radio-based instruction. Mobile teacher Robert said that he tried to use research-based instruction.
Eighteen (18) of the participants said that face to face instruction is the most effective. Three (3) of the participants believe that computer-based instruction is the most effective. Another three (3) of the participants said that blended learning instruction is the most effective. It is a combination of face to face instruction and independent learning.
Eighteen (18) of the participants said that mostly they used face to face instruction. Six (6) of the participants said that mostly they used blended learning. They believed that a combination of face to face instruction and independent learning are much better compare to face to face instruction only.
Twenty (20) of the participants revealed that they assess the learning modalities. Only one (1) of the participants said that he didn’t assess the learning modalities but in some other way he used to compare those learning modalities to be able to know which modalities is effective.
Eight (8) of the participants said that they tend to assess it to be able to know the learners’ development during their regular literacy learning session. Seven (7) of the participants said that they will be able to know which of the modalities is the most effective. Three (3) of the participants said that the learning modalities suited will depend on the learning style and availability of the learners.
5. What do mobile teachers encounter pertaining to the community participation on the Alternative Learning System basic services in their assigned area?
Nine (9) of the participants said that the learners were not committed in the program and absenteeism among them is the one reason why they didn’t completed the ALS program. Seven (7) of the participants said that uncooperative Barangay Officials is the reason why they can’t properly disseminate the ALS programs in their particular area. Four (4) of the participants said that it is difficult to reach-out remote Barangays where they can conduct community mapping and recruitment for prospect ALS learners. Three (3) of the participants said that their learners are interested in the ALS program but they tend to prioritize the source of their livelihood in order to sustain their living.
Thirteen (13) of the participants said that they seek assistance in the Barangay Officials through proper coordination and attending the Barangay Session to promote the ALS program. Five (6) of the participants said that they conduct house to house recruitment or home visitation to those learners who have been absent in the previous ALS regular literacy learning session and lending them an ALS modules in order for them cope up for the previous lessons. Four (4) of the participants said that they conduct Informal Education or Livelihood training that suited for the resources of respective Barangay.
Fifteen (15) of the respondents said that poverty is the main reason why they are being hesitant to participate in the ALS program; they prefer to work first for their family before studying. Four (4) of them said that, they have family problems so that they cannot avail the ALS program. Only two (2) of them said that they lack of necessary information about the benefits of the ALS program.
6. What significant experiences are revealed by Mobile Teachers particularly in the delivery of ALS programs and projects in the community?
Nine (9) of the participants said that they satisfied and enjoy. Six (6) of the participants said that they feel great and proud to be a mobile teacher. Three (3) of the participants said that being a mobile teacher is hard and challenging.
Twenty (20) of the participants said yes, being a mobile teacher is very challenging. Seven (7) of the participants said that they feel more motivated to become more productive teacher. Five (5) of the participants said that they feel joy and happiness to serve other people.
Four (4) of the participants said they feel discrimination from the formal teacher. They think that ALS mobile teacher is much easier compared to classroom teacher. Three (3) of the participants said that there must be a clear career path for professional growth of a mobile teacher. Three (3) of the participants said that they must receive the benefits intended mobile teachers such as Leave Benefits and Service Credit and Hazard Pay.
Conclusions

The following are the conclusions drawn from the findings:
1. Most of the participants were in their early adulthood and least of them were in midlife ages. Majority of the participants were male. Most of the participants were married and less than half a number of them were single. In terms of their teaching experience, majority of the participants were beginners and half of them were intermediate and seasoned respectively. In terms of plantilla position, most of them belong to teacher 1 and less than half of them belong to teacher 2 and teacher 3 respectively. Majority of them have earned Master Degree units and few of them gained their Master of Arts – Complete Academic Requirements and Doctoral Degree respectively. Most of them attended ALS seminars and training in national, regional, and division level. Few of them have a privilege to attend international level. As expected, the more number of years in teaching, the greater opportunities to attend ALS trainings and seminars.
2. The mobile teachers believe that they must possess patience, perseverance, passion of work, and eagerness in dealing with the ALS learners. They have to ensure that every individual in their respective assigned area have an access to basic education. They also believe that it is important to build harmonious relationship with the Local Government Officials or in the Barangay Officials in order to guide and support the implementation of ALS programs in the community. It also important to know the learners’ differences particularly their competency in order to address their difficulties in regular teaching-learning session.
3. ALS enrolment policy affects their performance. ALS enrolment policy implemented multiple entry and multiple exit means that the learner is allowed to enroll and exit to the program anytime due to some circumstances. It simply means that in ALS, every day is an enrolment day. The flow of the lesson may be repeated to give way to the late enrollees in coping up in their lesson. Usually the late enrollees are not competent enough to take the ALS A&E Test and a chance for low passing rate. In that case mobile teachers are not allowed to reject any enrollee, so some of the learners are taking for granted in the enrolment policy.
4. They used face to face instruction, independent learning, blended learning, computer-based instruction and radio based instruction. Most of the time, they used face to face instruction. Computer-based instruction has been proven effective but due availability of facilities and resources only few mobile teachers are able to utilized it. Blended learning instruction is a combination of any of the modalities that can best suited to the learners who manage their time in work, family and education.
5. One of the major problems their encounter is absenteeism among learners. Some of their learners are interested in the ALS program but they tend to prioritize the source of their livelihood in order to sustain their living. Uncooperative Barangay Officials is the reason why they can’t properly disseminate the ALS programs in their particular area. They find difficult to reach-out remote Barangays where they can conduct community mapping and recruitment for prospect ALS learners. While conducting community mapping, there is minor incident that one of the mobile teacher encountered mistaken identity by the armed civilian.
6. Mobile teachers were satisfied, proud and enjoy in teaching in the community. They enjoyed doing their job like a public servant because they will be able to help other people especially the out-of-school youths and adults. To be a mobile teacher is an adventurous profession, they met a lot of people in the community and the good thing for this are, they have an opportunity to help them, to educate them, and to teach them in acquiring new skills for their livelihood.
Being a mobile teacher is hard and challenging. They went to the community, performing not only a role of the teacher, sometimes as a counselor or anything may arise as they learners know that they are capable in helping them, so they must be multi-tasking. Sometimes they feel sad because beyond in their own capacity they won’t able to help them.
Mobile teachers affirmed that the Local Government Units and the Barangay Official should understand the importance of ALS in the community. They should allocate appropriate funding, and engage in the implementation of ALS programs and projects in the community. More ALS learning materials should produce so that it will sustain proper delivery of ALS literacy learning session in the community.
In part of the mobile teachers, they revealed that there’s a need for more ALS trainings, they must receive the appropriate benefits allocated by the central office such as hazard pay, service credits and leave benefits. Unlike in some divisions those benefits were properly received by the mobile teachers. The division offices have different interpretations regarding on the DepEd Order released by the central office stating the privileges of ALS mobile teachers. Equal opportunities for ALS implementers are not properly implemented.
Recommendations

On the basis of the major findings and conclusions of the study, the following recommendations are advanced;
1. As a mobile teacher, they must be more competent in teaching learning sessions, dealing with the different types of learners in the community and establish good rapport to Government Officials especially the Barangay Officials to give their support and assistance in implementation of ALS program.
2. Administrators should find fiscal and procedural processes that will accommodate and support the implementation of ALS programs and projects.

3. Learners should have a specific period of enrolment so that they will be assessed appropriately to address their difficulties and to become prepared in taking up the A&E Test.

4. Development and support staff will have to work to develop certain policies to augment the implementation of ALS programs.
5. Strengthen the bond to each other; join hand in hand in order to achieve Education for All. Through Alternative Learning System and the support of other agencies and stakeholders, basic education will be accessible to all.
6. This was a phenomenological qualitative study of mobile teachers’ experiences on Alternative Learning System. The importance of their perceptions played a significant role in their evaluation on the delivery of ALS program in the community. Although this study was qualitative in nature, the information gathered may have been conducive for qualitative proposal.
The mobile teacher may be overlooked in the current research as so much focused in education is on scores and common standards. Extended research involving the Alternative Learning System, may result further information for improving access to and quality basic education making towards in attaining Education for All goal.
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