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The Brain

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by

Kim Greenberg

on 24 September 2012

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Transcript of The Brain

The Motor Strip lies at the back of the frontal lobes. It controls precise movements as well as voluntary movements. Your fingers and mouth, as well as other areas that require a great amount of precision and control to operate, take up the most amount of space in this region. The Brain! By: Kim Greenberg & Alexa Korbakes Frontal Lobe Directs basic actions such as consumption, body temperature, sexual behavior, and aggression.Works to stabilize hormone concentration in the body with the pituitary gland. Has to do with reward and emotion because of its link with the amygdala. Hypothalamus Takes memories and converts them from short to long term.
Spatially identifies objects and remembers physical places. Hippocampus Part of cerebral cortex, found behind forehead. As the CEO of your brain, the frontal lobe helps you speak, make plans, move muscles, aids in word association, and use judgment. The frontal lobe keeps growing until the age of 25, which is why teenagers (like us!) are so impulsive. If it is damaged, it is highly likely to experience major personality change, loss of judgment, and you will not be able to plan ahead. Parietal Lobe The Parietal Lobe is part of the cerebral cortex and lies on top of your head near the back. The parietal lobe helps you process information, recognize faces, enables mathematical reasoning, and most importantly allows you to feel different touches and body positions. Amygdala Temporal Lobe The Temporal Lobe is a part of cerebral cortex, lying just above the ears. Anything you hear is processed through here. Each auditory area receives information sent from the opposite ear. This lobe is also responsible for the ringing in your ear and a desire for mystical/religious experiences. Connects emotion with different experiences. Where fear and anger occur. Responsible for the primitive “fight or flight” reaction. Occipital Lobe Pons Responsible for sleep and dream functions. Also helps manage movement. The Occipital Lobe is part of the cerebral cortex and lies at the back of the head. This area is almost entirely associated with vision. If the Occipital Lobe is damaged, you can go blind. Medulla In charge of the survival and basic
functions like breathing, heart rate,
blinking, swallowing, etc. Motor Strip Pituitary Gland “In charge” of the endocrine system by regulating other endocrine glands to release hormones. The hypothalamus is “the boss” of this gland. Sensory Strip The Sensory Strip lies at the front of the parietal lobe, parallel to and behind the motor cortex. It registers sensations felt through the skin and takes that information to move your body parts. It integrates all your senses into one perception. Broca's Area Important for speaking and found in the frontal lobe. Wernicke's Area Thalamus Located in the temporal lobe, it helps people understand languages. The Thalamus, aka the “post office” of the senses, acts as a passageway for information dealing with all the senses except for smell. It then passes this information to appropriate areas of the brain. It also directs messages from the high brain to the cerebellum and medulla. Outer View The Motor Strip lies at the back of the frontal lobes. It controls precise movements as well as voluntary movements. Your fingers and mouth, as well as other areas that require a great amount of precision and control to operate, take up the most amount of space in this region. Cross-Section View
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