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Medusa's Head

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by

Riker Santivong

on 31 January 2014

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Transcript of Medusa's Head

Medusa's Head
Cultural Influences
Morals
A Gift
Polydectes fell in love with Danaë, but she loved Dictys more. So Danaë pretended that Perseus consumed all her love.
Many years later, Perseus grew up and Polydectes soon thought of a way to get rid of Perseus.
He pretended that he needed to collect a wedding gift for a girl. All the young men brought the king a gift except Perseus who had nothing to begin with.
Polydectes pretended to be offended and Perseus boasted that he could get anything for him. Polydectes ordered him to get the Gorgon's Head.
The Myth
A king named Acrisius, King of Argos, had a beautiful daughter , her name was Danaë.
After consulting the Oracle at Delphi, he was warned that his daughter would have a son, who would kill him someday.
Danaë was locked in a tower with only a small window to the outside. Zeus came to her in a shower of gold and Danaë became pregnant.
When Acrisius found out. She was put into coffin with her baby, Perseus. The coffin was then cast into the ocean.
She was rescued by a fisherman called Dictys on the coast of an island. He was the brother of the king who ruled the island. She became a servant at the palace.
Perseus and the Medusa
Marriage to Andromeda and The Oracle Fulfilled
On his way home, Perseus came across a woman chained to a rock around a large flooded land. Perseus realized that she was a sacrifice to a monster
Perseus killed the monster by showing Medusa's head, and soon after they married.
Then they sailed back to Polydectes' island, where Perseus killed Polydectes with Medusa's head.
After that he set sail back to Argos where Acrisios had fled.
Acrisios hid in a city where a game was taking place; heroes everywhere participated including Perseus.
During a competition, Perseus threw a discus that flew off the course and hit Acrisios, who died.
Doctor Who episode "The Mind Robber" in 1969
Video Games such as God of War, Final Fantasy X, Dungeons and Dragons, etc.
Percy Jackson: The Lightning Thief
The last stage of a jellyfish's life is the "Medusa Stage"("Medusa Jellyfish").
StarCraft's Queen of Blades
Slaying The Gorgon
Despite from knowing where and what the Gorgons are, Perseus was a complete loss on what to do.
Athena came to him and told him where to get things that he needed to slay the Gorgon.
He collected the Hat of Darkness, a winged sandals, a shield like a mirror and a strong sword from Hermes.
After a long journey, Perseus finally arrived at the Gorgon's home, using the mirror to guide him to Medusa.
When he found Medusa, he cut her head off, put her head in a knapsack and ran as far as he could.
The moral of the story is perseverance. Perseus kept going on to defeat Medusa. He was not going to to stop until he gets her head.
Another moral is that sometimes when you try to alter fate, you only seal it.
Another moral is you need to be cunning and clever to win the day.
By
Riker Santivong
Audrey Hong
Athena Lopez

Coolidge, Olivia E., and Edouard Sandoz. "Medusa's Head." Greek Myths. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1949. 154-65.
"Medusa." Wikipedia. 26 Jan. 2014. Wikimedia Foundation. 27 Jan. 2014 <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medusa>.
"Perseus." Perseus. Ed. Micha F. Lindemans. 03 Mar. 2003. Encyclopedia Mythica Online. 27 Jan. 2014 <http://www.pantheon.org/articles/p/perseus.html>.
Perseus and Andromeda MKL1888.png. Digital image. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. 04 June 2005. Wikimedia Foundation. 28 Jan. 2014 http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/70/Perseus_und_Andromeda_MKL1888.png

Works Cited
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