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WHat Money can't buy

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by

Jose Ricardo Castro Coiro

on 28 October 2014

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Transcript of WHat Money can't buy

WHat Money
can't buy

Valeria Cartagena
José R. Castro
the Moral Limits of MArkets
Michael j. sandel
Michael J. Sandel
Born in Minneapolis, USA in March 5, 1953 ( Age: 61).
An American political philosopher.
Professor at Harvard University.
Known for Harvard TV-Series recorded course:
Justice
.
Subscribes to a version of communitarianism.
WHAT CAN'T
MONEY BUY?

FRIENDSHIP?
Fellowship
Speeches
Gifts
LOVE?
Sex
Company
Utility (Agreement)
Health?
Concierge Doctors
Insurance
"ALL HUMAN RELATIONS ARE, ULTIMATELY,
MARKETS RELATIONS "
"mORE AND MORE, WE ARE PUTTING A
PRICE ON NON ECONOMIC GOODS"
"MARKETS APpEAR AS A HEAVY HAND,
AND A manipulate ONE"
JUMPING
THE QUEUE

INCENTIVES
HOW MARKETS
CROWD
OUT MORALS

MARKETS IN LIFE
AND DEATH

NAMING
RIGHTS

borders in
the Market

ETHIC OF THE QUEUE
There is a Business named Line-Standing, that offers to make the queue for you.
You can purchase a Fast-Track Pass at Universal Studios and enjoy the rides as many times as you wish.
In China is too difficult to get a doctor
appointment without waiting for days.
"First come first served"
Same opportunities for everyone.
"Balm of Fairness"
VS.
ETHIC OF THE MARKET
Advantages
Time-Saving
Efficiency
Arrangement between buyers and sellers
there is an organization that pays $300 to drug-addicted mothers for sterilization.
THERE ARE SCHOOLS IN CHICAGO THAT PAYS THEIR STUDENTS
FOR EVERY GOOD GRADE THEY HAVE.
THE NBC REALITY SHOW "THE BIGGEST LOSER"
PAYS $250.000 TO PEOPLE WHO ACHIEVE THE BIGGEST
WEIGHT LOSS DURING THE SEASON.
financial
incentives
vs.
MORAL entanglements
Markets into everyday life.
"Motive or Encourage"
Corrupt attitudes.
"Risk-taking investment culture"
"What was once seen as a moral obligation is now seen as a market relationship."
there are companies that take out
insurance on the lives of their
employees to offset the significant
cost of replacing them if they die.
a macabre gambling game offers competing players the possibility to predict which celebrities will die in a given year.
there are investors who buy policies
from people who no longer want them and collect death benefits when people die.
Setting a price on human life
Companies reduce their taxes.
Humans are worth more dead than alive.
Not only safety net but also corporate finance.
Morally correct ?
ADS ARE EVERYWHERE
"Where markets leave their market"
Commercialism is growing.
Selling naming-rights.
A market kind of pollution.
Degradation of attitudes, practices and goods.
WHAT THE MARKET OFFERS
Maximizing welfare
Social utility
Efficiency
Science of human behavior
Matter of costs and benefits
Sets norms
HOW MORAL IS OBJECTED
Bribery
Ethic
Respect
Corruption
Coercion (not acting freely)
Manipulation
Inequality
DO WE WANT A SOCIETY WHERE EVERYTHING IS UP FOR SALE?

OR ARE THERE CERTAIN MORAL AND CIVIc GOODS THAT MARKETS DO NOT HONOR AND MONEY CANNOT BUY?
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