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A Novel Comparison of J.D Salinger's "The Catcher in the Rye" and John Green's "Looking For Alaska"

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Zach Muto

on 29 November 2012

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Transcript of A Novel Comparison of J.D Salinger's "The Catcher in the Rye" and John Green's "Looking For Alaska"

of A Novel Comparison John Green's
"Looking for Alaska" & J.D Salinger's
"The Catcher in the Rye" Authors By Zach Muto John Green Born August 24th 1997 in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
He attended Indian Springs Boarding School. Which was where 'Looking for Alaska' was largely based off of.
He was 2006 recipient of the Michael L. Printz Award, a 2009 Edgar Award winner, and has twice been a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. John Greens books have been published in more than a dozen languages. John Green is the New York Times bestselling author of Looking for Alaska, An Abundance of Katherines, Paper Towns, and The Fault in Our Stars John Green and his brother Hank Green are very popular youtubers under the channel 'Vlogbrothers'. J.D. Salinger Born January 1st, 1919 in New York City, USA.
Died January 27th, 2010 (age 91)
J.D. Salinger is best known for his novel The Catcher in the Rye
The success of The Catcher in the Rye led to public attention and scrutiny: Salinger became reclusive, publishing new work less frequently. He had a lot of unwanted attention which actually lead to a couple of lawsuits.
The Catcher in the Rye was described as “An unusually brilliant novel.” – The New York Times.
Adam Gopnik from the New York Times said that the novel was one of the “three perfect books” in American literature. John Green was very influenced by J.D Salinger. He even stated that the main protagonist in Looking for Alaska Miles 'Pudge' Halters was largely based off of Holden Caulfied, the protagonist in The Catcher in the Rye. Coming of Age Struggles & Issues the Protagonists had to Overcome The Outcome & Results The Beginning A coming-of-age story or novel is memorable because the character undergoes adventures and/or inner turmoil in his/her growth and development as a human being. The protagonist's behaviour in the beginning.
The Struggles & Issues they had to overcome.
The outcome of the protagonists in the end & how the changed. Both Are Immature. "Did she love me? Would she have left Jake for me? Or was it just another impulsive Alaska moment? It was not enough to be the last guy she kissed. I wanted to be the last one she loved. And I knew I wasn't. I knew it, and I hated her for it. I hated her for not caring about me. I hated her for leaving that night, and I hated myself, too, not because I let her go but because if I had been enough for her, sh) "He knew I wasn't coming back to Pencey. I forgot to tell you about that. They kicked me out. I wasn't supposed to come back after Christmas vacation, on the account of I was flunking four subjects and not applying myself and all. They gave me frequent warning to start applying myself-especially around mid-terms, when my parents came up for a conference with the old Thurmer- but I didn't do it. So I got the ax." (Salinger 6) Rebellion Against Authority "Why did we drink? For me, it was just fun, particularly since we were risking expulsion."
(Green 111) "I lay on my bed and lit a cigarette. You weren't allowed to smoke in the dorm, but yo could do it late at night when everybody was asleep or out and nobody could smell the smoke. Besides, I did it to annoy Stradlater.
(Salinger 54) Death "'You can't just make me different and then leave,' I said out loud to her. 'Because I was fine before, Alaska. I was fine with just me and last words and school friends, and you can't just make me different and then die.' For she embodied the Great Perhaps."
(Green 172) "I was only thirteen, and they were going to have me psychoanalyzed and all, because I broke all the goddam windows in the garage. I don't blame them. I really don't I slept in the garage the night he died, and I broke all the goddam windows with my fist, just for the hell of it." (Salinger 50) Isolation "'Yeah. I do, too. I'm sorry, Takumi,' and I meant it in the largest possible way. I was sorry we ended up like this, spinning wheels at a McDonald's. Sorry the person who had brought us together now lay dead between us. I was sorry I let her die. Sorry I haven't talked to you because you couldn't know the truth about the Colonel and me, and I hated being around you and having to pretend that my grief is this uncomplicated thing- pretending that she died and I miss her instead of that she died because of me."
(Green 175) The first thing I did when I got off at Penn Station, I went into this phone booth. I felt like giving somebody a buzz […] but as soon as I was inside, I couldn't think of anybody to call up. My brother D.B. was in Hollywood. My kid sister Phoebe […] was out. Then I thought of giving Jane Gallagher's mother a buzz […]. Then I thought of calling this girl […] Sally Hayes. […] I thought of calling […] Carl Luce. […] So I ended up not calling anybody. I came out of the booth, after about twenty minutes or so.
(Salinger 77) Matured "But ultimately I do not believe that she was only matter. The rest of her must be recycled, too. I believe now that we are greater than the sum of our parts. If you take Alaska's genetic code and you add her life experiences and the relationships she had with people, and then you take the size and shape of her body, you do not get her. There is something else entirely. There is a part of her greater than the sum of her knowable parts. And that part has to go somewhere, because it cannot be destroyed.
(Green 220) "'I thought it was 'If a body catch a body,' I said. 'Anyways, I keep picture all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobdy's around- nobody big, I mean - except me. And I'm standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff - I mean if they're running and they don't look where they're going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That's all I'd do all day. I'd just be the catcher in the rye and all. I know it sounds crazy, but that's the only thing I'd really like to be."
(Salinger 224) Both protagonists Know that everything will be all right. "So I know she forgives me, just as I forgive her. Thomas Edison's last words were: 'It's very beautiful over there.' I don't know where there is, but I believe it's somewhere and I hope it's beautiful.
(Green 221) "My hunting hat really gave me quite a lot of protection, in a way, but I got soaked anyway. I didn't care, though. I felt so damn happy all of a sudden, the way old Phoebe kept going around and around. I was damn near bawling, I felt so damn happy."
(Salinger 275) "Did she love me? Would she have left Jake for me? Or was it just another impulsive Alaska moment? It was not enough to be the last guy she kissed. I wanted to be the last one she loved. And I knew I wasn't. I knew it, and I hated her for it. I hated her for not caring about me. I hated her for leaving that night, and I hated myself too, not only because I let her go but because if I had been enough for her, she wouldn't have even wanted to leave."
(Green 171) The protagonist's behaviour in the beginning
The struggles and issues they had to overcome
The outcome of the protagonists in the end and how they changed.
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