Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

HEALTHY EATING

No description
by

Dragan Radovic

on 26 January 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of HEALTHY EATING

Are Starches and Sugars made up of basic compounds known as monosaccharides.
Sugars are naturally present in foods such as milk , fruits, vegetables and honey
Starch is present in foods such as
potatoes, bread, rice and pasta
Food Psychology
Do we choose what we eat, or does food choose us?

Vitamins
Vitamins are very important to help our bodies to function. We get vitamins from the food and also from sunlight. It is important to consume vitamins from different types of food in order to help the body function properly. They help to boost the immune system, growth and development and also help the cells in the body. Vitamins which are good for the body are Vitamin A, Vitamin B, Vitamin D,Vitamin K and Folate (Folic Acid).
Is it a choice?
Is food choice a privelidge or an asset? Does everyone have access to healthy foods or is it selective? Do emotions, character and personality affect what enters ones mouth, or is it a choice of mind over matter? Does this simplify the question, or complicate it further?
Healthy eating is explored through questioning the above and the following subtopics in detail.
We look forward to alleviating confusion regarding healthy digestion and hope to positively change the eating habits of the viewer for the better
Organic Foods and Carbs
The consumption of these Carbohydrates are essential to healthy eating.
They are:
Fruits which contain fruit fibre which slows sugar absorption.
Vegetables which boost fibre intake to ensure balance in the body
Nuts and seeds contain good carbohydrates and omega fats

Contain the purest forms of Carbohydrates.
Carbohydrates in Animal based foods
Meat, poultry and seafood are predominantly carbohydrate free
These foods are high in protein
Vitamins In Organic Food
Organic foods have the same types of vitamins as vegetarian foods but can be consumed by eating wheat, tomatoes, cabbage and lettuce. These different types of vegetables also allow the body to take in a good source of antioxidants. Vitamins D and E found in organic food help to fight against cancer, heart disease and fatty acids (Organic Consumers Association, N.d.).
Vitamins In Animal Based Foods
Animal based foods such as fish, meat, offal, egg and dairy foods are some of the main sources for naturally occurring cholecalciferol (Vitamin D-3). High amounts of Vitamin D are mainly found in fish especially fish liver. However, products with milk and dairy such as milk that are not fortified, they are normally low in Vitamin D.
Vitamins In Pre-Prepared Foods
Vitamins in pre-prepared foods mostly contain fat-soluble vitamins. Folate (Folic Acid) is one of the main sources of vitamins found in pre-prepared foods. Most foods that are pre-prepared are foods such as tuns, ham and also canned soups which also contain a high amount of Vitamin K. This helps to break down fat in different parts of the body to prevent weight gain in different ways.
References

Vitamins are also found in different types of vegetarian foods and natural sunlight. In order to gain vitamin D plenty of sunlight, margarine, fortified cereals and vegetable oils are needed in daily routine to help maintain a healthy diet(Veggie Global, N.d.). Vitamin D helps to boost the lung function and strengthen the respiratory system (Veggie Global, N.d.). Deficiency of vitamin D in the body may cause rickets and osteomalacia. (Medical News Today, 2010).
Another type of vitamin that also helps the body to function is vitamin E. In order to gain vitamin E consumption of vegetable oils such as sunflower oil and olive oil, nuts, seeds (sunflower seeds) and avocados(Veggie Global, N.d.).
Vitamins In Vegetarian Foods
Carbohydrates


They:
help cause the colour change of bread, toast and bakery products;
contribute to the chewiness, colour and sweet flavour of caramel;
thicken products such as sauces and custards.

Preprepared foods contain the bad carbohydrates
Carbohydrates such as starch are added to packaged foods to enhance colour and shelf life

Sugars are added to enhance flavour and appeal of packaged foods

These carbohydrates have a short lifespan in the body and are converted into simple sugars and fats

They create an instant energy boost that is short lived
http://kidshealth.org/teen/food_fitness/nutrition/vitamins_minerals.html
http://www.veggieglobal.com/nutrition/vitamins.htm
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/195878.php
http://www.vegansociety.com/lifestyle/nutrition/b12.aspx
http://www.organicconsumers.org/organlink.cfm
http://advances.nutrition.org/content/4/4/453.abstract
http://nutritiondata.self.com/foods-000104000000000000000-1.html
http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/carbohydrates
www.heartfoundation.org.au
www.extension.iastate.edu/humansciences/content/
Describing the thought process of ones experience during 'hunger' times, is best described as challenging!
'To eat, or not to eat' and the mental challenges faced as a result of this phrase will be discussed. Food psychology pertaining to emotions, hunger, physical feelings and facts based on nutrition information are the core sub topics of this area.
To eat, or not to eat?
Without food one cannot function in the greater scheme of life. Supplements, nutrients and overall intake which drive molecular cells to drive the larger organism work from a depletion flow. This requirement is derived from what one’s body needs on a deficiency tank scale.
To simplify this understanding, one can look at the nutritional scale labelling food and accept for example; higher sugar counts provide greater short term bursts of energy and higher protein counts provide fuller hunger satisfactions. This list greatly expands with both positives and negatives for both short term and long term intake including the addition of quantity.
The point is: food ultimately determines how a human body will feel. .....
Physical feelings tied in with nutritional facts
Prior to engulfing oneself into looking at elements counts for carbohydrates, proteins, fats, sodium, sugar, calories and so on... One must respect their relationship with food on a separate type of scale; a scale that pertains to psychological food association which also doubles in ones physical reaction to that of their psychological inhabitancies (David, 2013).
This scale is one that is normally ignored on a conscious level and passed through on the subconscious.....
‘It is the relationship between mind and food’ ... that food psychology begins....
Emotions
In contrast to the opening remark ‘food ultimately determines how a human body will feel’, one’s preconception of food will determine how ‘food to the human body will feel’.
Highlighting Drs James Meschino and Barry Simon’s interview on Allan Gregg (2011) the main theory presented describes “solution substitution”. Substituting bad or comfort foods for a healthier alternative balance leading to ones necessary healthy eating habit change is vital.
Healthy eating requires one to approach food and accept “solution substitution” with a positive and emotional mental habit change.
Those that would like to further explore this theory can visit:
Feelings associated with pleasure and pain form the largest perception one will have toward food.
Hence, each individual designs a specific food intake system unique to them, from both a sub conscious and conscious perspective.
Supermarkets particularly rely on consumers buying with emotions as oppose to mind. Supermarket stores are probably one of the oldest and most frequent investors of food psychology (Calorie Count, 2013).
This emotional relationship directly affects stimuli within the body which heightens or decreases the feelings of pleasure and pain though, also pertains to how one metabolises and digests what went in as well, including psychological issues such as depression (Burley, 2014).
Hunger
Hunger may then be seen as either;
• A depletion of certain elements the body physically needs, or
• An emotional state of mind in which mental factors play the primary role.

Hence, determining hunger from that of starvation, to that of cravings becomes a complicated issue (Menon, 2010).
Lack of water consumption is one of the major leading factors to ones binge eating episode or frequent snacking problem. This sense of hunger chemically imbalances the body’s required intake and confuses the mind (Heart Foundation, 2013). Comfort foods tend to be at the forefront of hunger responses causing diet imbalances and poor food choices (Science Daily, 2013).
Healthy eating is therefore not only a combination of vitamins and carbohydrates, but something that incorporates the mind and body as one (Foster, Makris and Bailer, 2005).
Healthy eating is crucial to holistic wellbeing and a longer, richer and more fulfilling life.
Allan Gregg 2011, The psychology of eating and why diets fail, 23 August, viewed 15 January 2014. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jYWv5beWWY
Burley, Nicole (2014)’Is comfort food causing your depression?’ Psych Central [Online] Available at: http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2012/05/15/is-comfort-food-causing-your-depression/ (Accessed: 25 January 2014)
Calorie Count (2013) Supermarket Psychology Available at: http://caloriecount.about.com/article/supermarket_psychology (Accessed 28 November 2013)
David, Marc (2013) ‘Mind over food’ Institute for the Psychology of Eating [Online] Available at: http://psychologyofeating.com/mind-over-food/ (Accessed: 25 January 2014)
Foster, G, D., Makris, A, P. and Bailer, B, A (2005) ‘Behavioural treatment of Obesity’ the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition [Online] Available at: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/82/1/230S.full (Accessed 19 December 2013)
Heart Foundation (2013) Water Available at: http://www.heartfoundation.org.au/healthy-eating/food-and-nutrition-facts/Pages/water.aspx (Accessed 18 December 2013)
Menon, Divya (2010) ‘The psychology of food cravings’ Association for Psychological Science [Online] Available at: http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/the-psychology-of-food-cravings.html (Accessed 18 December 2013)
Metzger, M (2007) ‘Making sense of credibility on the Web: Models for evaluating online information and recommendations for future research.’ Journal of the American Society for Information Science & Technology Vol. 58 Issue 13, p2078-2091. 14p. 1 Diagram, 2 Charts.
Science Daily (2013) Food Psychology Available at: http://www.sciencedaily.com/search/?keyword=food+psychology (Accessed 18 December 2013)

References (Food Psychology)

Allan Gregg 2011, The psychology of eating and why diets fail, 23 August, viewed 15 January 2014.
Burley, Nicole (2014)’Is comfort food causing your depression?’ Psych Central [Online] Available at: http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2012/05/15/is-comfort-food-causing-your-depression/ (Accessed: 25 January 2014)
Calorie Count (2013) Supermarket Psychology Available at: http://caloriecount.about.com/article/supermarket_psychology (Accessed 28 November 2013)
David, Marc (2013) ‘Mind over food’ Institute for the Psychology of Eating [Online] Available at: http://psychologyofeating.com/mind-over-food/ (Accessed: 25 January 2014)
Foster, G, D., Makris, A, P. and Bailer, B, A (2005) ‘Behavioural treatment of Obesity’ the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition [Online] Available at: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/82/1/230S.full (Accessed 19 December 2013)
Heart Foundation (2013) Water Available at: http://www.heartfoundation.org.au/healthy-eating/food-and-nutrition-facts/Pages/water.aspx (Accessed 18 December 2013)
Menon, Divya (2010) ‘The psychology of food cravings’ Association for Psychological Science [Online] Available at: http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/the-psychology-of-food-cravings.html (Accessed 18 December 2013)
Metzger, M (2007) ‘Making sense of credibility on the Web: Models for evaluating online information and recommendations for future research.’ Journal of the American Society for Information Science & Technology Vol. 58 Issue 13, p2078-2091. 14p. 1 Diagram, 2 Charts.
Science Daily (2013) Food Psychology Available at: http://www.sciencedaily.com/search/?keyword=food+psychology (Accessed 18 December 2013)
HEALTHY EATING
Carbohydrates perform different functions in food products.
(Image: Retrieved from Google images, 2014)
Full transcript