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The Witch of Blackbird Pond

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AKKMM Arts

on 8 May 2013

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Transcript of The Witch of Blackbird Pond

by Elizabeth George Speare The Witch of Blackbird Pond Main Characters The story is written in the perspective of Katherine Taylor, mainly known as Kit. She is an orphaned teenager from an island called Barbados. She travels to her aunt's house in Wethersfield. Kit is stubborn and prideful at times. "'Not England. I was born on Barbados.'" "...he retorted, 'had I any idea you can swim.' Her eyes widened. 'Swim?' she echoed scornfully. 'Why my grandfather taught me to swim as soon as I can walk.'" Nat is a seafaring boy and befriends Kit who later falls in love with her. Nat can be described as sarcastic and loyal "She had noticed him often, his thin wiry figure swinging easily hand over hand up the rigging, his sandy, sun-bleached head bent over a coil of rope." "...his mother called him Nat." Hannah is a Quaker, who is accused of being a witch. She gives Kit advice and becomes a good friend. Hannah is loving and kindhearted. "... a woman was sitting there watching her, a very old woman with short-cropped white hair and faded, almost colorless eyes set deep in an incredibly wrinkled face." Judith and Mercy are sisters and cousins of Kit. Mercy is the oldest and teaches the town kids. She is crippled but very kind. "...Kit realized that she leaned on crutches." "'Just a dame school. For the younger children in the summer months.'"-Mercy. Judith is envious of Kit, likes to be dominant, and she is conceited. "... the long fringe of lashes barely hid the envy and rebellion in her blue eyes." Credits
May 7th, 2013
Period 5
Mrs. Braun
Group Members
Audrey Armienta
Kira Bravo
Kaitlin Howard
Meena Kian
Meghan Hernandez
Song: Burn It Down by Linkin Park Main Events Characterization The author uses indirect characterization throughout the story. Setting The setting of the story is in Wethersfield, Connecticut. Wethersfield is a small town with few small houses. There is a small cottage near a pond called "Blackbird Pond" where a supposed witch lives there. In the story you can find the setting on (pg 29) " Her heart sank. This was Wethersfield! Just a narrow sandy stretch of shoreline.... Out of the mist jutted a row of cavernous wooden structure that must be warehouses and beyond that the dense dripping green fields and woods....No town not a house, only a few men and boys...." The tone of the story is sympathetic. "As Kit watched, her uncle bent slowly and scooped up a handful of brown dirt from the garden patch at his feet, and stood holding it with a curious reverence, as though it were some priceless substance." (pg. 134) The mood of the story is risky. "'Why should take it upon yourself to mend a roof for the Quaker woman?' demanded her uncle. 'She lives all alone-' began Kit. 'You are never to go to the place again, Katherine. I forbid it.'" (pg. 121) Conflict of the Story The conflict of the story, " The Witch of Blackbird Pond," is that all the townspeople have no doubt that Kit and Hannah are witches. They believe the two ladies cursed Wethersfield by spreading a disease to the community so, in rage the people make a mob. The mob of angry men and women burn down Hannah's house and then show up at Kit's door to take her away. That night Kit spends the evening in a cold shed only to go to trial in the morning. At trial Kit is blamed for the most horrific of things and is about to be found guilty when Nat and prudence save the day. Climax The climax of the story is when Nat and Prudence show up at the trial. They have Prudence testify that Kit did not bewitch her. We chose this event because that is when the court realizes that Kit is not a witch. Resolution After Kit is found innocent, and she wants to return home. The characters all realize who they really love. Kit, the main character changes. She was unwilling to adapt to her new home and was stubborn. She changed to be loving and brave. The change shows during her trial and when she gave the dresses to her cousins out of love, not pride. Figures Of Speech 1. Symbolism: On pages 41- 42, the dresses can be thought as symbolizing different meanings to each character. Figuratively to Judith it means to have pride and beauty, to Aunt Rachel it brings back memories of her childhood, to Mercy she is thankful that Kit gave it to her, to Uncle Matthew it symbolizes pride and to pity the poor, and to Kit the dresses symbolizes love. Literally, it is a present to all of them. Theme: "Make your own first impressions" Action Bibliography https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/1/1d/Andrew_Drake.jpg/170px-Andrew_Drake.jpg Recommendation Event 1: In 1687, 16-year-old Katherine Tyler, (also known as Kit) leaves her home in Barbados after her grandfather's death and goes to Wethersfield, Connecticut to live with her aunt and uncle in their small Puritan Community. Event 3: When she arrives in Wethersfield, Kit finds Connecticut very different form Barbados. In her previous home, she had servants but here is expected to work along with the rest of the of the family. At church, Kit meets the rich, 19-year-old William Ashy, who begins to have the interest in Kit. Kit and Mercy begin teaching the 'dame school' for young children. Everything goes well until one day, bored with the normal lessons, Kit decides the children will act out a part from the Bible. Mr. Eleazar Kimberly, the head of the school enters the house just as things get out of hand. He is outraged at Kit for acting out the bible and shuts down the school. Heartbroken, Kit runs to the meadows. Event 4: When she is there, she meets a kind, elderly woman named Hannah Tupper, who was banned from the Massachusetts colony because she is a Quaker. As outcasts, Kit and Hannah develop a deep relationship, and even after her uncle forbids Kit to continue the friend ship, Kit keeps visiting Hannah. During one of her visits, she again meets the handsome Nathaniel "Nat" Eaton, son of the captain of the Dolphin. Without knowing it, she falls in love with him, and though he doesn't say so, Nat loves her as well. Kit also begin secretly teaching Prudence to read and write; Goodwife Cruff claims the child is a 'halfwit' and refuses her to attend the dame school. Event 5: When a deadly illness reaches through Wethersfield, a mob gathers to kill Hannah by burning her house, since everyone believes she is a witch who has cursed the town. Kit warns Hannah, and the two women escape to the river just as a Dolphin appears in the morning mist. Nat takes Hannah aboard the ship, and then invites Kit to come with them. She refuses, explaining her Mercy is ill, even though Nat believes Kit doesn't want to ruin her engagement to William Ashby. Event 6: After the Dolphin sails away, Kit returns home to find that Mercy's fever has passed. She also discovers that John has secretly loved Mercy, and Mercy felt the same towards John. In the middle of the same night, the townspeople and Goodwife Cruff's husband, accuses Kit of being a witch. Event 8: Kit doesn't explain that Prudence wrote her name in the book, as she does not want Prudence to get in trouble with her parents. Then, just as the case seemed to be decided, Nat shows up with Prudence who says that she wrote her name in the hornbook, not Kit. To demonstrate, Prudence reads a Bible passage, convincing her father that she is intelligent and that no witchcraft was involved. Event 10: However, Nat appears back in Wethersfield with his own ship, the Witch, named after Hannah and Kit. Nat and Kit acknowledge their love for one another and Nat asks her to come aboard the "Witch" for keeps. Event 2: On the way to their new home, there is a stop in Saybrook, a small town just down the river from Wethersfield, and four new passengers aboard the Dolphin. A small girl named Prudence accidentally drops her doll in the water and begs her mother to get it back for her. Her mother, Goodwife Cruff, harshly says no and tells her not to be foolish. Impulsively, Kit jumps into the water and retrieves the doll. Goodwife Cruff then believes Kit is a witch saying, "No respectable woman could stay afloat like that." Event 7:The next day, after a night in shivering shed, Kit is asked to explain why her hornbook was in Hannah's house and a copybook with Prudence's name written in it, as the towns people fear that she and Hannah had been casting a spell over Prudence. Event 9: John returns to Wethersfield after serving in the militia as a doctor. Judith ends up being engaged to William Ashby and Mercy is engaged to John Holbrook. Kit becomes homesick and thinks about returning to Barbados. We would recommend this book because it is a good story about friendship. It includes jealousy, love, suspense, and adventure. It has a twist in the plot and things are not as they seem. Also, this book is good for those who can relate to moving to new environments and staying original. Character Effects 1st Example: "'Why, Judith,' Mercy rebuked her gently. 'What would you have her do? You know what the Scriptures tell us about caring for the poor and the widows.' 'There's no Scriptures saying Mother has to be the one to do all the caring,' Judith retorted. 'She wears herself out over people like Widow Brown, and honestly Mercy, if Mother were ill how many of them to you think would lift a finger to help?'" (Pg. 40) This shows that Mercy is understanding and caring because she understands why her mother goes out and cares for the poor. It shows Judith as uncaring and stubborn person because she does not realize that her mother is doing a good deed. This also shows that their mother, Aunt Rachel, is modest and caring, because she goes out of her busy work to help other people. 2nd Example: "At first Prudence had been speechless. In all her short life the child had seldom seen, and certainly never held in her hands, anything so lovely as the exquisite little silver hornbook."(Pg.106) In this example Prudence can be considered thankful and jubilant because she finally has the chance to learn. Hannah Tupper trusted Kit into her home and soon enough they became close friends, despite what everyone said. Hannah Tupper is the character that is looked down on, and Kit is the first (besides Nat) to befriend Hannah. Because Hannah and Kit became good friends, they helped each other to prove the rumors of them being witches were untrue. 2. Personification- On page 11, the narrator uses personification. "America was behaving strangely underfoot." Figuratively, Kit is not used to walking on land because of being on the ship for so long. Literally it means that America was behaving unnatural and was acting strange. 3. Personification- On page 221, the author uses personification again. "'And the Dolphin? Did something happen to her?' 'Just a heavy blow. She's hove down for repairs at the yard.'" Figuratively, they are referring the boat as a girl. Literally, they are talking about a girl that is in need for repairs at the yard. 4. Simile- On page 221, Nat uses a simile. "'Chipper as a sandpiper.'" Figuratively, it means that Hannah is happy and healthy. Literally, it means that she is a happy sandpiper. 5. Symbolism- On page 90, Hannah uses symbolism. "'My friend brought the bulb to me, a little brown thing like an onion. I doubted it would grow here, but it just seemed determined to keep on trying and look what has happened.'" Figuratively, it means a person overcoming obstacles and thriving. Literally, it means that the plant just grew even in a place not suitable for it. 6. Imagery- On page 116, Nat uses imagery. "...and in a marketplace there was a man with some birds for sale. They were sort of yellow-green with bright scarlet patches. I was bent on taking one home to my grandmother in Saybrook. But father explained it wasn't meant to live here, that the birds here would scold and peck at it. ...that morning when we left you here in Wethersfield- all the way back to the ship all I could think of was that bird'"Figuratively it is giving Kit a sense of why the birds remind her. Literally it means that Kit is a bird who is very colorful. http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_U_V7Ze_rLvc/TJqOYP0AHXI/AAAAAAAAAMM/zVqR-2fPyoo/s1600/Kin+Ship.jpg http://www.touretown.com/Portals/0/schoolhouse%202.jpg http://www2.gol.com/users/quakers/Ann_Preston.jpg http://www2.gol.com/users/quakers/Ann_Preston.jpg http://graphicsfairy.blogspot.com/2011/08/vintage-halloween-clip-art-witch-with.html http://www.sonofthesouth.net/revolutionary-war/colonies/salem-witch-trial.jpg http://www2.lhric.org/pocantico/franklin/hornbook1.jpg http://joereynoldsphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/9141808-wedding-bouquet-with-gold-wedding-rings-on-white-background.jpg http://www.hdwallpapersarena.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Ships_Adventure_ship_008187_.jpg
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