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Poetry Analysis

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by

Leah Jillson

on 22 March 2013

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Transcript of Poetry Analysis

by Leah Jillson Gerard Manley Hopkins
(1844 – 1889) Analysis Interpretation,
Poetic Form,
Rhyme scheme, POETRY ANALYSIS God's Grandeur Regarded as one of the Victorian era's greatest poets.
Born to a protestant family, but at age 22, Hopkins converted to Catholicism.
Burnt all poetry he had written.
Became a priest himself, and only started writing poems again till age 31.
Introduced what he called "sprung rhythm."
Does not limit the number of unaccented
syllables and allows for more flexibility in his lines and created new acoustic possibilities
~ Resembles the patterns of natural speech in English Author By Gerard Manley Hopkins *Italian sonnet
*it contains fourteen lines divided into an octave and a sestet
* each line has 10 syllables
*not traditional iambic pentameter This poem tells of the
beautiful brilliance of God 's immanence and how it shows itself in our world even though generations have polluted the earth.
It talks about renewal... of the damaged earth, and of the people who live on it. Poetic form Rhyme scheme The world is charged with the grandeur of God. A
It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; B
It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil B
Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod? A
Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; A
And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; B
And wears man's smudge and shares man's smell: the soil B
Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod. A

And for all this, nature is never spent; C
There lives the dearest freshness deep down things; D
And though the last lights off the black West went C
Oh, morning, at the brown brink eastward, springs — D
Because the Holy Ghost over the bent C
World broods with warm breast and with ah! bright wings. D Diction and Tone *The first line is very bold and starts the poem off with vitality
He describes God's grandeur as an electric force "The world is charged with the grandeur of God.
It will flame out like shining from shook foil; *'charged'- uses this word in a new and surprising context
*'flame out'- continues the electric tone Tone: Passionate and reflective *rhetorical question and repeated action words give the poem intensity Sound Alliteration like shining from shook foil

It gathers to a greatness...

There lives the dearest freshness deep down things;

World broods with warm breast and with ah! bright wings. Assonance Why do men then now not reck his rod? Hard and Soft sounds used Imagery The world is charged with the grandeur of God.
It will flame out, like shining from shook foil;
It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil
Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod?
Generations have trod, have trod, have trod;
And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil;
And wears man’s smudge and shares man’s smell: the soil
Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.
And for all this, nature is never spent;
There lives the dearest freshness deep down things;
And though the last lights off the black West went
Oh, morning, at the brown brink eastward, springs—
Because the Holy Ghost over the bent
World broods with warm breast and with ah! bright wings. Figures
of Speech *Simile (like shining from shook foil),

*Repetition (have trod, have trod, have trod)

*Personification (nature, morning)

*Characterization (man, Holy Spirit) Connotations * the last lights off the black west went = the sun setting

*reck his rod= God's handiwork Themes: "Gerard Manley Hopkins." - Poets.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Mar. 2013.
"God's Grandeur : Gerard Manley Hopkins - Summary and Critical Analysis." God's Grandeur : Gerard Manley Hopkins. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Mar. 2013.
"Google Images." Google Images. N.p., 4 Oct. 2010. Web. 21 Mar. 2013.
Houston, John Porter. "The Design of Rimbaud's Poetry." Angel Fire. N.p., n.d. Web.
Ronquillo, Ulysses. "Arthur Rimbaud (Overview & Analysis)." Arthur Rimbaud Overview Analysis. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Mar. 2013. Related to the theme The Immanence and superiority of God

Man's neglect of God's will

The renewal of the earth and mankind The repetition of the word 'have trod' captures the mechanical forces in verse because of their heavy accents. What is sometimes called the ‘daily grind’ is repetitive thump in which the feet of generation march on; and the ‘trod…trod…trod’ sets up the three beat rhythm of the next line: ‘seared…bleared…smeared!

The characterization of the Holy Ghost as protective and always present is done through the word 'broods' in that it is over the world which is characterized as being bent in sleep and forgetfulness. Meanings ‘Seared’ means ‘dried up’ or it can mean ‘rendered incapable of feeling’.

‘Bleared’ means ‘blurred with inflammation of the eyes’ and

‘smeared’ means ‘rubbed over with dirt’. 'Generations have trod, have trod, have trod;
And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; ' 'It will flame out, like shining from shook foil;
It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil... ' Sometimes the glory of God shows itself in sudden brightness like the flashing light of reflections of foil.

At other times, the poet thinks of an olive press, with the oil oozing (flowing out) from the pressed fruit. It oozes from every part of the press in a fine film and then the trickles gathers together to form a jar of oil. In the same way, the grandeur of God is found everywhere, trickling from every simple thing in a created universe and accumulating to form greatness. The poet wonders why people do not care about God’s rod. People pursue their worldly activities without any thought of God’s will and without the fear of god’s anger. Diction- Word Choice * sentinel= vigilent, guarded * sanction= established custom. Eternity by Arthur Rimbaud Translated by Francis Golffing I have recovered it.
What? Eternity.
It is the sea
Matched with the sun.

My sentinel soul,
Let us murmur the vow
Of the night so void
And of the fiery day.

Of human sanctions,
Of common transports,
You free yourself:
Your soar according… From your ardor alone,
Embers of satin,
Duty exhales,
Without anyone saying at last.

Never a hope;
No genesis.
Skill with patience…
Anguish is certain.

I have recovered it.
What? Eternity.
It is the sea
Matched with the sun. Eternity Arthur Rimbaud Theme French poet and adventurer, who stopped writing verse at the age of 21, and became after his early death a myth in French gay life.
Rimbaud's poetry, partially written in free verse, is characterized by dramatic and imaginative vision.
His works are among the most original in the French Symbolist movement Poetic form:
Six quatrains of five-syllable lines reveal a varying rhyme scheme with the sixth quatrain repeating the first. Interpretation:
The persona claims to have discovered Eternity, when the sun's light fades over the ocean. Humanity knows nothing of what night brings because we sleep through it. We don't know what the final darkness brings either into which we will all disappear. However no one escapes from the suns fiery light.
Humanities' life is empty because there is no hope, and he longs for something eternal. As humans we have knowledge and patience and this combination ensures that suffering is inevitable. My sentinel soul,
Let us murmur the vow
Of the night so void
And of the fiery day. Of human sanctions,
Of common transports,
You free yourself:
You soar according... >murmuring gives the feeling of emptiness in society and it's goals and the word vow gives the feeling that it is a dreaded rule that has to be followed.

>from the word void, we understand his idea of the uncertainty and nothingness in darkness

>he wants to be freed from the emptiness of his life and soar to eternity Uncertainty about eternal life Imagery 'From your ardor alone,
Embers of satin,
Duty exhales,
Without anyone saying at last.' '...Eternity.
It is the sea
Matched with the sun.' this phrase depicts the image of a sunset This phrase further develops the imagery of light. This light of the sun is the only truth he finds in the day and he finds comfort in it. Tone- reflective, unsatisfied Rhetorical Question technique:
This starts off and ends the poem with a
involvement that pushes the reader
to consider and empathize with his idea. 'I have recomered it.
What? Eternity.' Repetition of the first and last stanzas creates a meaningful ending to the poem. The point is stated twice deeming it very important. Eternity is the main theme and focus of the person's thoughts. Other techniques God's Grandeur and Eternity Similarities Both poems were talking about spiritual matters.
They both had a reflective tone
Both referenced mankind as a whole in their main points: God's Grandeur described mankind's rejection of God's will and it's pollution of the world/ Eternity spoke of mankind's hopelessness Differences Rhyming was a key factor in the flow of God's Grandeur. Eternity had no rhyme in the translation.

Author Structure:
The poem contains short lines and short complete thoughts that create a feeling of true meaning and gives each word emphasis
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