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Copy of Of Mice and Men-Loneliness

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Helen Law

on 1 September 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Of Mice and Men-Loneliness

Loneliness
Of Mice and Men
But how does Steinbeck express loneliness in his book?
Loneliness is a basic part of human life.
The Setting
The setting Steinbeck creates represents the time of the 1929 "Wall Street Crash". Many men had to look around for work and left countries very lonely
Steinbeck creates a lonely and blue atmosphere at many times in the book.The way Steinbeck uses symbolism in his writing makes it clear that all the men on the ranch are lonely, with particular people lonelier than others.
"A path beaten by hard boys coming down from the ranches to swim in the deep pool, and beaten hard by tramps who come wearily down from the highway in the evening to jungle-up near water"
"a path beaten by hard boys coming down from the ranches to swim in the deep pool, and beaten hard by tramps who come wearily down from the highway in the evening to jungle-up near water"
Temporary
Isolated
Lonely
"an ash-pile made by many fires"
Many men come and go
Many men have to go through the miserable and lonely life
George Milton
Lennie Small
Two migrant workers that have been on and off ranches trying to find work in a time where there was very scarce chances of opportunity
"Over each bunk there was nailed an apple box with the opening forward so that it made two shelves for personal belongings of the occupant of the bunk"
Lonely
Insecure
Low Standards
Curley's Wife
"Some People think being alone makes you lonely, I think that being surrounded by the wrong people is the loneliest thing in the world"
"Listen nigger, you know what I can do to you if you open your trap? Well you keep your place then nigger. I could get you strung up on a tree so fast it ain't even funny"
"Seems like they ain't none of them cares how i gotta live"
Heavily Made Up Face
"Curley's wife", In the novel Steinbeck chooses not to introduce a name for her, this indicates that she is simply an "object" and "possession" of Curley and nothing more. In the novel we only see Curley's wife through the eys of the men on the ranch and through the entire course of the novel she is only referred to as "Curley's wife". She is also mentioned as "girl" in the first time we are introduced to her
Towards the end of the novel both of the characters die with what they enjoy most, and have so longed for. Curley's wife dies knowing that someone has eventually listened to her and gave her the attention she cries for so deeply, and Lennie dies with the thought of his own American Dream in his mind
Crooks
Loneliness has made Crook's a very bitter and isolated individual. He had been segregated for his race
"Maybe you can see now. You got George. You know he's goin' to come back. S'pose you didn't have nobody. S'pose you couldn't go into the bunk house and play rummy `cuase you was black...A guy needs somebody--to be near him"
Crooks
Left out of nearly all conversation
Left with no one to talk to
This results in a growing loneliness
"Come on in and set a while...'Long as you won't get out and leave me alone, you might as well set down." Crooks has been lonely for so long that he expects people not to talk to him.
Migrant Workers
Who are migrant workers?
Who are migrant workers?
In Relation to "Of Mice and Men"
George and Lennie
-Travel together
-Feels responsible for each other
-Understands friendship
-Shares money
George and Lennie
-Travel together
-Feel responsible for others
-Understand friendship
-Share money
-Put each other first
Typical Migrant Workers
-Travel alone
-Only responsible for themselves
-Don’t understand friendship
-Use all money on personal wants
-Everything done for personal gain
After the Wall Street crash in 1929 many Americans lost their jobs and were thrown into depression. As a result to the scarcity of job vacancies, many Americans were forced to travel vast distances to find work. These migrant workers generally travelled south-west, which was the area in America that was least affected by the crash. They usually found work at ranches, where they bucked barley most of the day.
John Steinbeck makes good use the migrant workers to bring out the theme of loneliness in his novel “Of Mice and Men”. By doing so, Steinbeck also draws emphasis to the difference in character of George and Lennie in relation to the other, typical migrant workers.
The Ranch
Throughout the story the ranch has played a big role in symbolizing loneliness in all the characters
At multiple times in the book, characters have created conversation with one another but most of the time, the people in the conversation hardly even knows each other
This shows that all the workers here are lonely and are in need for someone that will listen to their story
"Well, I ain't told this to nobody before. Maybe I ought'n to. I don't like Curley. He ain't a nice fella" then Lennie says,"Maybe if I took this pup out and throwed him away George wouldn't never know. An' then I could tend the rabbits without no trouble"
Full transcript