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Allusions in Romeo and Juliet

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Lexie A

on 9 April 2013

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Transcript of Allusions in Romeo and Juliet

Allusions Romeo and Juliet in By Lexie All Romeo and Juliet... from ROMEO
"Well, in that hit you miss. She’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow. She hath Dian’s wit.
And, in strong proof of chastity well armed
From love’s weak childish bow, she lives uncharmed.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms,
Nor bide th' encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold.
Oh, she is rich in beauty, only poor
That when she dies, with beauty dies her store." from Romeo and Juliet... MERCUTIO
"Nay, I’ll conjure too!
Romeo! Humours, madman, passion, lover!
Appear thou in the likeness of a sigh!
Speak but one rhyme, and I am satisfied.
Cry but “Ay me!” Pronounce but “love” and “dove.”
Speak to my gossip Venus one fair word,
One nickname for her purblind son and heir,
Young Abraham Cupid, he that shot so true
When King Cophetua loved the beggar maid.—
He heareth not, he stirreth not, he moveth not.
The ape is dead, and I must conjure him.—
I conjure thee by Rosaline’s bright eyes,
By her high forehead and her scarlet lip,
By her fine foot, straight leg, and quivering thigh,
And the demesnes that there adjacent lie,
That in thy likeness thou appear to us." from Romeo and Juliet... JULIET
"Hist! Romeo, hist!—Oh, for a falconer’s voice,
To lure this tassel-gentle back again!
Bondage is hoarse, and may not speak aloud,
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies,
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine,
With repetition of 'My Romeo!'" from Romeo and Juliet... MERCUTIO
"Without his roe, like a dried herring. O flesh, flesh, how art thou fishified! Now is he for the numbers that Petrarch flowed in. Laura to his lady was but a kitchen-wench— marry, she had a better love to berhyme her—Dido a dowdy, Cleopatra a gypsy, Helen and Hero hildings and harlots, Thisbe a grey eye or so, but not to the purpose.— Signior Romeo, bonjour! There’s a French salutation to your French slop. You gave us the counterfeit fairly last night." from Romeo and Juliet... MERCUTIO
"Without his roe, like a dried herring. O flesh, flesh, how art thou fishified! Now is he for the numbers that Petrarch flowed in. Laura to his lady was but a kitchen-wench— marry, she had a better love to berhyme her—Dido a dowdy, Cleopatra a gypsy, Helen and Hero hildings and harlots, Thisbe a grey eye or so, but not to the purpose.— Signior Romeo, bonjour! There’s a French salutation to your French slop. You gave us the counterfeit fairly last night." from Romeo and Juliet... MERCUTIO
"Without his roe, like a dried herring. O flesh, flesh, how art thou fishified! Now is he for the numbers that Petrarch flowed in. Laura to his lady was but a kitchen-wench— marry, she had a better love to berhyme her—Dido a dowdy, Cleopatra a gypsy, Helen and Hero hildings and harlots, Thisbe a grey eye or so, but not to the purpose.— Signior Romeo, bonjour! There’s a French salutation to your French slop. You gave us the counterfeit fairly last night." from Romeo and Juliet... MERCUTIO
"Without his roe, like a dried herring. O flesh, flesh, how art thou fishified! Now is he for the numbers that Petrarch flowed in. Laura to his lady was but a kitchen-wench— marry, she had a better love to berhyme her—Dido a dowdy, Cleopatra a gypsy, Helen and Hero hildings and harlots, Thisbe a grey eye or so, but not to the purpose.— Signior Romeo, bonjour! There’s a French salutation to your French slop. You gave us the counterfeit fairly last night." from Romeo and Juliet... from Romeo and Juliet... MERCUTIO
Without his roe, like a dried herring. O flesh, flesh, how art thou fishified! Now is he for the numbers that Petrarch flowed in. Laura to his lady was but a kitchen-wench— marry, she had a better love to berhyme her—Dido a dowdy, Cleopatra a gypsy, Helen and Hero hildings and harlots, Thisbe a grey eye or so, but not to the purpose.— Signior Romeo, bonjour! There’s a French salutation to your French slop. You gave us the counterfeit fairly last night. from Romeo and Juliet... JULIET
"Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds,
Toward Phoebus' lodging. Such a wagoner
As Phaeton would whip you to the west
And bring in cloudy night immediately." from Romeo and Juliet... JULIET
"Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds,
Toward Phoebus' lodging. Such a wagoner
As Phaeton would whip you to the west
And bring in cloudy night immediately." http://images.wikia.com/olympians/images/e/e7/Eros_(1).jpg http://www.artmagick.com/images/content/shaw/hi/shaw25.jpg http://owlnet.overlake.org/Academics/Faculty/jrothfels/Latin%20II%20Ovid%202007/Spartacus/images/Echo%20and%20Narcissus%20together.jpg http://www-deadline-com.vimg.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/cleopatra__120811010914.jpg http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_wAzhaGMEHmQ/R0zcxvZuQYI/AAAAAAAAAB4/WI7QAF_EL8c/s400/thisbe.jpg http://elizabethanliteraryculture.wordpress.com/2011/03/16/petrarch-and-laura-an-unreachable-love-and-desire/ http://elizabethanliteraryculture.wordpress.com/2011/03/16/petrarch-and-laura-an-unreachable-love-and-desire/ http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e0/Gu%C3%A9rin_%C3%89n%C3%A9e_racontant_%C3%A0_Didon_les_malheurs_de_la_ville_de_Troie_Louvre_5184.jpg/350px-Gu%C3%A9rin_%C3%89n%C3%A9e_racontant_%C3%A0_Didon_les_malheurs_de_la_ville_de_Troie_Louvre_5184.jpg https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSWVmY6dIdif9JBhOqoZCQ9UncH8xOV4L9QJMuSQlw-2QlV5OjguA http://preraphaelitesisterhood.com/helen-of-troy/ http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e3/Nicolas_Poussin_-_Helios_and_Phaeton_with_Saturn_and_the_Four_Seasons.jpg http://nfs.sparknotes.com/romeojuliet/page_24.html http://nfs.sparknotes.com/romeojuliet/page_74.html http://nfs.sparknotes.com/romeojuliet/page_90.html http://nfs.sparknotes.com/romeojuliet/page_106.html http://nfs.sparknotes.com/romeojuliet/page_106.html http://nfs.sparknotes.com/romeojuliet/page_106.html http://nfs.sparknotes.com/romeojuliet/page_106.html http://nfs.sparknotes.com/romeojuliet/page_106.html http://nfs.sparknotes.com/romeojuliet/page_154.html http://nfs.sparknotes.com/romeojuliet/page_154.html MERCUTIO
"Without his roe, like a dried herring. O flesh, flesh, how art thou fishified! Now is he for the numbers that Petrarch flowed in. Laura to his lady was but a kitchen-wench— marry, she had a better love to berhyme her—Dido a dowdy, Cleopatra a gypsy, Helen and Hero hildings and harlots, Thisbe a grey eye or so, but not to the purpose.— Signior Romeo, bonjour! There’s a French salutation to your French slop. You gave us the counterfeit fairly last night." CUPID...also known as the god, Eros Romeo talks to Benvolio when he is depressed about Rosaline's decision to remain a virgin. The Greeks believed that Eros was one of the first gods before even Zeus came to exist. Before any other form of life survived on Earth, it was just a big sphere of stone. Eros, the god of love and beauty, let his love scatter all over the world. Living things started to develop and grow, and eventually the world took shape as humans know it today. Greeks called him "Eros," but the Romans who later adapted Greece's religion, called Eros "Cupid." EROS' Arrows Eros was always believed to have carried a bow made of gold and a few arrows with him.
When he would shoot a sharp arrow made of the "whitest silver," whoever was struck fell in love with who Eros wanted him/her to fall in love with.
When he shot a dull arrow composed of lead, the person struck disliked whoever Eros wanted him/her to dislike.
Cupid's arrows ALWAYS worked on the person hit with one. Rosaline will not tolerate being struck by one of Cupid's arrows. Cupid's arrows are weak and childish against her armor. She vowed to forever be a virgin, and she would not fall in love.
Romeo knows he has no chance if Rosaline thinks she is invincible against Cupid. This makes him grieve and feel more depressed. INTERPRETATION Allusion- "making a casual or indirect reference to something." Mercutio is calling out for Romeo who has jumped the orchard wall into Capulet territory. Mercutio does not know about Romeo's secret love, Juliet. The story of...
KING COPHETUA AND THE BEGGAR MAID King Cophetua was a rich ruler that owned everything he wanted; he had gold, silver, servants, seamstresses, and more. He only lacked a wife; he was lonely.
He visited the princesses of nearby towns, but never found one that he felt had a genuinely kind heart.
One day, the King was on his way to go hunting when he passed an old, blind man, and his poorly-dressed daughter. They were beggars...trying to survive off of what handouts they were given. The King stopped to give the old man a coin when he glanced at the daughter's face. He had never seen a face so beautiful as the beggar's. He could tell just by looking at her that her soul was beautiful as well. He asked her to marry him, and she said "yes."

The townspeople were all surprised, but Kind Cophetua and the Beggar Maid reigned over a joyous city. Juliet is talking to Romeo, and she must be quiet because Romeo cannot be caught on Capulet ground. Echo and Narcissus Echo was a nymph that loved Narcissus. Many nymphs loved Narcissus, but in Narcissus' eyes, no one was worthy enough for himself.
The goddess Juno had a husband that committed adultery. Echo enabled Juno's husband to escape; Juno cursed Echo due to her fury. Echo's curse was that she could not speak except what was spoken to her. One day Echo found Narcissus in the woods. “Why do you shun me?... Let us join one another,” Narcissus tells her. Echo was ecstatic that he actually noticed her. She desperately wanted to share her love and feelings with him, but could not speak. She ran and flung herself on him in order to display her emotion. “Hands off! I would rather die than you should have me!” Narcissus tells Echo as Echo is pushed to the ground. Echo was so heart-broken that she ran off to live in the mountains where she died of grief. All that exists of her now is her voice; it repeats only what is spoken to her. Cupid King Cophetua and the Beggar Maid http://www.ldodds.com/projects/twinkle/twinkle.jpg Echo and Narcissus http://images.clipart.com/thm/thm11//CL/5433_2005010014/000803_1055_35/000803_1055_3576_v__v.thm.jpg Cleopatra http://us.123rf.com/400wm/400/400/skm2000/skm20001008/skm2000100800002/7531011-a-field-of-brightly-colored-plastic-jewels-which-are-pink-red-blue-and-yellow-in-color.jpg Thisbe Mercutio to Romeo... http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_bR_IU36H5w8/TOdF7zpAQhI/AAAAAAAAJM4/L9M38-zPllc/s1600/63365_ear_lg.gif Cleopatra was the final pharaoh of ancient Egypt before it was taken over by the Romans. She is popular for her beauty and sexual affairs, but she tried her best to keep Egypt out of the Romans' hands. A pharaoh was treated as a god/goddess; he/she could do anything he/she wanted to do. When the pharaoh asked someone to do something for him/her, the person would willingly do the job. Throughout most of the centuries that gypsies have existed, they have been discriminated against and executed for their beliefs. Mercutio calls Cleopatra, a pharaoh (treated as a goddess)....a gypsy, that is discriminated and executed. Laura http://www.koraorganics.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/LOVE16.jpg Petrarch http://www.koraorganics.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/LOVE16.jpg INTERPRETATION Juliet wanted to find the cave where Echo lies, and make Echo repeat "My Romeo" until Echo's voice is more rough-sounding that Juliet's voice already is. Juliet has been desperately wanting to see Romeo. She yearned for him and secretly called "My Romeo" over and over. INTERPRETATION Mercutio believes that when Romeo catches a glimpse of Rosaline, he compares her to Cleopatra (a woman of beauty). Romeo visualizes Rosaline as making Cleopatra look like a gypsy (a hated person throughout history.) Mercutio to Romeo... Thisbe fell in love with a handsome man named Pyramus. Their families were belligerent and did not get along with each other. Their love had to be kept a secret. They decided to meet up one day; Thisbe arrived to the place first. She was wearing a scarf and waiting on Pyramus when a lion came out of the nearby woods. The lion had just made a kill, and its mouth and teeth were covered in blood. Thisbe ran to escape the lion and accidentally dropped her scarf. The story of Thisbe and Pyramus is very similar to the Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet. It adds to the play by being one of multiple foreshadows to what may occur to Romeo and Juliet. The lion picked up the scarf with its bloody jaws and shredded it to pieces. Pyramus arrived and saw the bloody scarf; he assumed Thisbe had been killed. He could not stand living life without her so he immediately stabbed himself with his sword. Thisbe returned back to the meeting place to see her love on the ground bloody and lifeless. She could not live life without him either, so she took his sword and stabbed herself as well. ADDS TO THE PLAY INTERPRETATION Mercutio also mentions that Thisbe had a "grey eye or so,but not to the purpose." Years ago, having a grey eye meant beauty. Mercutio is comparing how Romeo sees Rosaline to Thisbe. Romeo sees that Thisbe's grey eye produced very little beauty compared to Rosaline's beauty. Laura is claimed to have been Francesco Petrarch's true love. However, no one is sure if she actually existed, or if she is just a figment of Petrarch's imagination. Researchers believe they found the "Laura" that Petrarch refers to. He wrote multiple poems about Laura. INTERPRETATION Laura inspired Petrarch to write poetry, and Petrarch went on to become one of the most famous writers. Mercutio says about Laura "marry, she had a better love to berhyme her." He is mocking Petrarch like there could have been someone better to create poetry about Laura. Mercutio to Romeo... Mercutio to Romeo... Petrarch is referred to as the "Father of Humanism." He was a poet, writer, and he loved a girl named Laura. ADDS TO THE PLAY Mercutio is mocking Petrarch's poetry when he is teasing Romeo. Petrarch is one of the best poets there has ever been, and Mercutio says that Laura could have found someone better. Dido Carthage http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/44/CarthageMap.png/250px-CarthageMap.png Dido had to escape from her former place of living and ended up in Carthage. She became the Queen. Aeneas left from Troy and arrived at Carthage. Dido and Aeneas end up falling in love and they get married. The gods ordered Aeneas to leave Carthage so he could achieve his destiny. Dido gave up her power as Queen just to love Aeneas, and now he left. Dido was so angry and distraught that she committed suicide. Another Tragedy INTERPRETATION Mercutio mocks the way Romeo sees Rosaline and uses Dido's attire as an example. Dido, a Queen of Carthage, has many royal dresses and gowns. Romeo thinks that compared to Rosaline, Dido is dressed in shabby clothes. This is yet another instance of foreshadowing what is to come for Romeo and Juliet. Dido's life ends in a suicide due to love as well. Hilding: a mean word for a "player" Helen of Troy Helen of Troy was thought of as one of the most beautiful immortals in ancient Greece. Men could not resist her beauty; she was kidnapped. The reason for her kidnapping was that an aging man, Theseus, wanted to have sexual relations with one of Zeus' daughters before he died. He picked Helen and raped her. When she was finally able to escape, she was still considered a virgin. Hero Hero swore to remain a virgin.
Every night, Leander would swim from Asia to Europe to meet Hero.
They eventually were each other's true loves.
On one of Leander's swims, he drowned.
Hero felt that she could not continue without Leander, so she jumped from a tall tower into the ocean below. INTERPRETATION Mercutio is yet again foreshadowing the deaths of Romeo and Juliet with more tragic love stories. Rosaline was also sworn to celibacy. Mercutio mocks Helen and Hero by making them look like players compared to the strict oath Rosaline is following. http://www.deviantart.com/download/90750216/Fantasy_Ocean_Castle_by_Kira4Kun.png Helen and Hero https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSLls_ICw4_UnhvlDEPef9Y4apGtLctbTG0k8CV1b0-_FHuk9Qbhg Apollo Phoebus Phoebus Greek god of the sun and light.
Every day, he rides his chariot and fiery horses across the sky.
When his journey starts, it means the sun is rising. When his journey across the sky ends, the sun sets. INTERPRETATION Juliet yearns for the sun to set as quick as possible because night time is the only time she can safely see Romeo. http://salspcservices.com/fire-and-ice-by-zeda[1]-000.jpg Helios & Phaethon Phaethon was the son of the god Helios. Helios rode across the sky in his chariot every day to keep Earth at the right temperature needed for survival. Phaethon wished to ride the chariot and control the reigns just one time. Helios could not turn him down. Helios warned Phaethon that if he rode too close, Earth would burn up, and if he rode too far away, Earth would freeze. Phaethon could not control the stallions and set Earth on fire. To get away from Earth, Phaeton pulled tight on the reigns and the chariot went into space. The waters started to freeze over. Zeus had to get Phaethon off of the chariot in order to save mankind. Zeus used his almighty lightning bolt and struck Phaeton. He plummeted down to Earth and died. Juliet was using another reference to someone carrying the sun. She wanted the sun to set so she could finally be with her Romeo. Act I Scene 1 (lines 209- 212) Act II Scene 1 line 14 http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-QhAJIEEcUQs/TxBuXa7HYPI/AAAAAAAAQLo/mgYatCi2pIU/s1600/Cupid+graphicsfairyred.jpg http://www.wisbar.org/SiteCollectionImages/WisconsinLawyer/2006/02/armour.jpg WIFE
GOES
HERE http://us.123rf.com/400wm/400/400/derocz/derocz0709/derocz070900028/1696394-absent-minded-king--cartoon-vector-illustration.jpg Act II Scene 2 lines 161-162 Act II Scene 4 lines 38-44 SHHHHHH! http://image.shutterstock.com/display_pic_with_logo/483673/483673,1292550981,2/stock-vector-winter-scarf-cartoon-67416055.jpg http://www.easyvectors.com/assets/images/vectors/afbig/c708571318374448320e192edd479168-sword-clip-art.jpg Act II Scene 4 lines 38-44 Act II Scene 4 lines 38-44 Act II Scene 4 lines 38-44 Act II Scene 4 lines 38-44 Act III Scene 2 Act III
Scene 2 INTERPRETATION Mercutio does not realize it when he is yelling for Romeo, but he is referencing the love-at-first-sight that King Cophetua and Romeo experienced. Act II
Scene 4 lines 38-44 I N T E R P R E T A T I O N
Aldrich, Blue. "Bardic: The Tale of Helios and Phaethon."examiner.com. N.p., 16 Aug 2009. Web. 1 Mar 2013.

Bell, Robert. "About Helen of Troy." Modern American Poetry. N.p.. Web. 1 Mar 2013.

BULFINCH, Thomas. "Legend." echo.me.uk. echo.me.uk, 30 Apr 2008. Web. 1 Mar 2013.

"Dido." Mortal Women of the Trojan War. Standford. Web. 1 Mar 2013.

Easby, Dr. Rebecca Jeffrey. "Burne-Jones' King Cophetua and the Beggar Maid." Smart History. Khan Academy. Web. 1 Mar 2013.

"Gypsies and the World." . N.p.. Web. 1 Mar 2013. <http://www.sul-online.org/media/content/special_features/Yugos_Gypsies.htm>.

Harding, S. B.. "Eros, the Love-God." Trans. Array Greek Gods and Heroes. New York: Scott Foresman and Company, 1897. 78-82. Web. 1 Mar. 2013.

"Hero." In2Greece. Webmistress. Web. 1 Mar 2013.

"Laura." Francesco Petrarch and Laura deNoves. Peter Sadlon, 10 Sep 2007. Web. 1 Mar 2013.

" The Love Story of Pyramus and Thisbe." . N.p.. Web. 1 Mar 2013. <http://cmes.arizona.edu/sites/cmes.arizona.edu/files/The Love Story of Pyramus and Thisbe.pdf>.

Martin, Roger. "Cupid, aka Eros, has long history." . University Relations, 11 Feb 2000. Web. 1 Mar 2013.

"Mr. Marassa's Greek Mythology Course The Face In The Pool The Story of Echo and Narcissus." . N.p.. Web. 1 Mar 2013.

"Notes on the notes." Shakespeare-Navigators. N.p.. Web. 1 Mar 2013. <http://www.shakespeare-navigators.com/romeo/NotesT24.html>.

"Phaethon." Theoi Greek Mythology Exploring Mythology in Classical Literature and Art. Theoi Project. Web. 1 Mar 2013.

Pina, Stephanie. "Helen of Troy." Pre-Raphaelite Sisterhood. Wordpress, 05 Dec 2007. Web. 1 Mar 2013.

Rayment, Kate. "Phoebus Apollo: God of the Sun."InDepthInfo on Greek Gods. W. J. Rayment. Web. 4 Mar 2013.

Scudder, Horace. "KING COPHETUA AND THE BEGGAR MAID." The Baldwin Project. Yesterda'ys Classics. Web. 1 Mar 2013.

Smith, S.E.. "Who is Cleopatra?." wiseGEEK. Conjecture Corporation, 23 Nov 2012. Web. 1 Mar 2013.
Works Cited
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