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Mythology

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on 16 September 2013

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Transcript of Mythology

Mythology
By Jimmy Du
Saturn Κρονος
Saturn, also known as Cronus was the god of time and the ages.
Saturn's symbol is the scythe.
Saturn is the father of all the Olympian Gods.

Jupiter
Jupiter, also known as Zeus, is the god sky, lightning, and the king of the gods.
Jupiter's symbols include the lightning bolt and the eagle.
Juno
Juno, also known as Hera, is the goddess of marriage, women, and childbirth.
Juno's most notable symbol is the peacock.
Ceres
Ceres, also known as Demeter, is the goddess of the harvest, grain, agriculture, and growth.
Ceres' symbols include the torch and wheat.
Neptune
Neptune, also known as Poseidon, is the god of the sea, rivers, floods, and droughts.
Neptune's symbol is the trident.
Neptune is the creater of horses.

Pluto
Pluto, also known as Hades, is the god of the Underworld and the dead.
Pluto's symbol is the three-headed dog Cerberus that guards Underworld.
Vesta
Vesta, also known Hestia, is the goddess of hearth.
Vesta's symbols include the hearth and flowered branch.
Mars, also known as Ares, is the god of war, bloodshed, and violence.
Mars' symbols include the vulture, snakes, and dogs.

Mars
Minerva
Minerva, also known as Athena, is the goddess of intelligence, skill, warfare, battle strategy, and wisdom.
Minerva's symbol is the olive tree.
Vulcan
Vulcan, also known as Hephaestus, is the god of fire, metalworking, and crafts.
Vulcan's symbols include the hammer and tongs.
Diana
Diana, also known as Artemis, is the goddess of the hunt, wilderness, and animals.
Diana's symbols include the deer and a bow and arrows.
Apollo
Apollo is the god of the sun, prophecy, and oracles.
Apollo's symbol is the lyre.
Mercury, also known as Hermes, is the god travel, roads, heralds, trade, diplomacy, thievery, language, and is the messenger of gods.
Mercury's symbols include winged sandals and the herald 's wand.
Mercury
Bacchus, also Dionysus is the god of wine, parties, madness, and chaos.
Bacchus' symbol 's include the wine cup, and a crown of ivy.
Bacchus
Janus is the god of beginnings and endings.
Janus' symbols include the key and the staff
January is named after Janus, because it is the beginning of a new year.
Janus
Faunus, also known as Pan, is the god of the plains, shepards, and rustic music.
Faunus' symbol is the pan pipes.

Faunus
Cupid, also known as Eros, is the god of love and attraction.
Cupid''s symbol is a bow and arrows.
Cupid
Proserpina, also known as Persephone, is the goddess of Spring Growth.
Proserpina's symbol is a torch and a bundle of grain.
Proserpina is also the Queen of the Underworld.
Proserpina
Philemon and Baucis
One day, Jupiter(Zeus) and Mercury(Hermes), visited a town disguised as ordinary peasants. After wandering around the town without being welcomed at all, they came across Philemon and Baucis's old house. Though not rich, they welcomed the gods and treated them to dinner. The two gods revealed themselves, and thanked the couple for their kindness and in turn saved their lives from a flood that destroyed the whole town.
Overthrow of Saturn (Cronos)
Saturn, the father of many of the Olympian gods, was told from a prophecy that his son would overthrown him. Therefore, he ate all his children, but his wife Rhea hid Zeus, when he was born, and wrapped a blanket around a stone and pretended that it was Zeus. Zeus ended up becoming a powerful god and made Saturn throw up all his other children.
Cupid and Psyche
One day, Aphrodite heard about a beautiful maiden that people were saying was more beautiful than Aphrodite herself, so she sent Cupid, her son, to go make her fall in love with the ugliest man in the world. Cupid though, having seen her for the first time, fell in love with her and took her to his palace. Psyche was never supposed to look at him though, but under her sisters' persuasion she look at Cupid. Aphrodite instructed Psyche to do many quests if she wanted to see Cupid again, and Psyche accomplished them all so Cupid and Psyche married and lived happily every after.
Minerva and Arachne
Arachne, a girl who was really good at weaving, arrogantly challenged the goddess Minerva to a weaving competition. Minerva wove about how great the gods, while Arachne wove about how all the gods chased after human girls. Minerva was raged by her decision and Arachne decided to hang herself. Just before Arachne died, Minerva changed her and the string into a spider.
Ceres and Proserpina
One day, Pluto saw Proserpina playing in a field with nymphs and kidnapped her to be his wife and Queen of the Underworld. Ceres, Proserpina's mom, looked through out the whole Earth to find her daughter. When Ceres could not find Proserpina, she halted all growth of plants. Finally, Zeus convinced Pluto to let Proserpina back, but Proserpina had eaten Pluto's pomegranate seeds so she had to spend part of the year with Pluto each year. When she is with Ceres the plants grow and thrive, but when she is with Pluto, the plants die and become dormant.
Orpheus and Eurydice
On the day Orpheus, a phenomenal musician, wed Eurydice, a satyr chased after Eurydice and she accidentally stepped on a viper. Eurydice died and Orpheus was so heartbroken, he played music so mournful, that all the gods heard it and decided to give him a chance to get his wife back. Orpheus journeyed to the Underworld and had to lead Eurydice out of the Underworld without looking back at her until they were both in the Overworld. Orpheus was starting to doubt Pluto, so as he stepped into the Overworld, he quickly stole a glance at her and saw her once again. Eurydice though, was still in the Underworld a step away from the boundary and therefore disappeared back to the Underworld.
Pyramus and Thisbe

Pyramus and Thisbe, were two lovers that could never see each other due to their parents' rules. They lived right next to each other though and talked the a crack in the wall every single night. One day, they decided to meet each other at the first mulberry bush outside of town. When Thisbe arrived Pyramus hadn't arrived yet. Suddenly, Thisbe saw a lioness who had just eaten a victim. Thisbe was so frightned, she dropped the cloak she was gonna give Pyranus and ran away. Pyramus arrived later and saw the cloak on the ground ripped to shreds with blood on it and lion's footprints. Pyramus was heartbroken and stuck his sword in himself with grief. Thisbe decided to come back and found Pyramus on the ground dying. She was so upset by the misunderstanding, that she too stuck the sword throuhg herself and the couple died together.
Daedalus and Icarus
When Theseus slayed the mighty minotaur with the help of Daedalus's string, King Minos was very angry and forced Daedalus and Icarus to stay trapped in a labyrinth. Daedalus designed wings for him and his song to fly away. He warned his son to pay attention when flying and not fly too close to the sun otherwise his wings would melt away. Icarus ignored his father's instructions, and flew too close to the sun and his wings melted off and he drowned in the sea.
Deucalion, the son of Prometheus, was warned by Prometheus that Zeus would flood the whole world soon. Deucalion built a boat for him and his wife Pyrrha. They survived the nine day flood in the boat and found themselves in Thessaly when the flood subsided. After consulting an oracle, they cast stones to produce men and women that would help repopulate the Earth.
Deucalion and Pyrrha
Apollo made Cupid angry one day, and Cupid shot Apollo with an arrow that made him fall in love with Daphne, and Cupid shot an arrow in Daphne that made her hate Apollo. Apollo chased after Daphne and Daphne was so enraged she pleaded for Gaia for help. Daphne was then turned into a laurel tree.
Apollo and Daphne
Volcano
- a vent in the crust of the earth or another planet or a moon from which usually molten or hot rock and steam issue; also : a hill or mountain composed wholly or in part of the ejected material
Mercurial
- characterized by rapid and unpredictable changeableness of mood
Cyclopean
- Huge, massive
Herculean
- of extraordinary power, extent, intensity, or difficulty
Arachnid
- any of a class (Arachnida) of arthropods comprising chiefly terrestrial invertebrates, including the spiders, scorpions, mites, and ticks, and having a segmented body divided into two regions of which the anterior bears four pairs of legs but no antennae
January
- the first month of the Gregorian calendar
Martial
- of, relating to, or suited for war or a warrior
Cupidity
- a strong desire for money or possessions
Pomegranate
- a round, red fruit that has a thick skin and many large seeds
Olympic
- of or relating to the Olympics
Derivatives
Citations
http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/zeusmyth/ig/Zeus/Jupiter-Tonans.htm
http://www.greek-gods-and-goddesses.com/pictures-of-neptune.html
http://lithinos.deviantart.com/art/Hades-and-Cerberus-334089840
http://www.greek-gods-and-goddesses.com/artemis-pictures.html
http://www.greek-gods-and-goddesses.com/pictures-of-hermes.html
http://www.greek-gods-and-goddesses.com/athena-pictures.html
http://www.greek-gods-and-goddesses.com/pictures-of-ares.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Venus_pudica_Massimo.jpg
http://www.aworldofmyths.com/Greek_Gods/Cronus.html
http://www.aworldofmyths.com/media/Greek_Gods/Zeus/Zeus_4.jpg

http://www.aworldofmyths.com/media/Greek_Gods/Demeter/Demeter_3.jpg

http://www.aworldofmyths.com/media/Greek_Gods/Poseidon/Poseidon_3.jpg

http://www.aworldofmyths.com/media/Greek_Gods/Hades/Hades_1.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c9/Athena_with_owl_Louvre.JPG

http://www.aworldofmyths.com/media/Greek_Gods/Hephaestus/Hephaestus_1.jpg

http://www.aworldofmyths.com/media/Greek_Gods/Artemis/Artemis_1.jpg

http://www.thehistorybluff.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/apollon.jpg

http://www.aworldofmyths.com/media/Greek_Gods/Hermes/Hermes_1.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2d/Michelangelo_Bacchus.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/00/Janus-Vatican.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:PanandDaphnis.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/88/Paelinck_-_Eros.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:AMI_-_Isis-Persephone.jpg

http://www.theoi.com/Gallery/K13.2.html


http://indulgy.com/post/vYZelkXU61/gian-lorenzo-bernini-apollo-and-daphne

http://www.paleothea.com/Gallery/PyrrhaDeucalionFontana.html

http://www.dl.ket.org/humanities/literature/litpacket/images/icarus.jpg

http://www.cgfaonlineartmuseum.com/p/pagani1.jpg

http://www.musesrealm.net/stories/orpheuseurydice.jpg

http://www.art-prints-on-demand.com/kunst/gianlorenzo_bernini/pluto_proserpina_hi.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Adam_Elsheimer_008.jpg

http://www.goddess-athena.org/Museum/Paintings/Arachne/Minerva_Arachne_Bauer_f.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Psyche_et_LAmour.jpg

http://www.theoi.com/Gallery/T6.1.html




http://www.greek-gods-and-goddesses.com/pictures-of-hermes.html
http://www.greek-gods-and-goddesses.com/athena-pictures.html
http://www.greek-gods-and-goddesses.com/pictures-of-ares.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Venus_pudica_Massimo.jpg
http://www.aworldofmyths.com/Greek_Gods/Cronus.html
http://www.aworldofmyths.com/media/Greek_Gods/Zeus/Zeus_4.jpg
http://www.aworldofmyths.com/media/Greek_Gods/Demeter/Demeter_3.jpg
http://www.aworldofmyths.com/media/Greek_Gods/Poseidon/Poseidon_3.jpg
http://www.aworldofmyths.com/media/Greek_Gods/Hades/Hades_1.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c9/Athena_with_owl_Louvre.JPG

Venus
Venus, also known as Aphrodite, is the goddess of love, beauty, desire, and pleasure.
Venus's symbols include roses and a scallop shell.
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