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iTunes U

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john crossley

on 5 July 2011

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Transcript of iTunes U

iTunes U More than 800 universities have active iTunes U sites. About half of these institutions — including Stanford, Yale, MIT, Oxford, and UC Berkeley — distribute their content publicly on the iTunes Store. Preston College is a good example of a comparable UK institution who have used iTunes U The college website has links to the iTunes content The Open University was the first to reach 20 million downloads since starting to use iTunesU in 2008 – with mobile phones increasingly used to download their tracks. Martin Bean, Vice-Chancellor of the Open University: “The growth of the iTunesU concept reflects the changing ways that people are learning.The way people want to learn is changing. Many now actively seek out content they are interested in and which they can watch, read or listen to when it suits them. New channels are helping people to fit learning in with their lifestyles.” Research at the University of Leeds found that "the overwhelming majority of students rejected the idea that pre-recorded lectures could be used in place of the traditional lecture".Students preferred to use podcasts as a means of reviewing or revising what had already been discussed in lectures. Keep podcasts short and to the point – 15 minutes per week is probably about right for most students unless the podcast is expected as part of the contact time for the course.Use a system such as RSS to push the information out to students; this is likely to result in a higher uptake than if they students have to manually download the files.Be aggressive in overcoming technical problems at the start, such as making sure files are easy to download both on-campus and at home.Include motivating material in the podcasts such as interviews and topical news articles. 8T. Bell, A. Cockburn, A. Wingkvist & R. GreenMaintain a live feel to the podcasts, and inject personality. Recording the podcast with minimal editing dramatically reduces the work for the producer and creates a dynamic mood for the episode. Apart from the initial overhead of setting up the recording system and background music, the time taken to produce a podcast will not be much longer than the podcast itself. Do not be surprised or concerned about low response-rates to requests for feedback in the podcasts. This is a known phenomenon for the podcast medium. Based on our experience, podcasts seem to be an attractive tool to help engage students, build a class “culture”, and disseminate the important and fascinating problems that the discipline addresses Include motivating material in the podcasts such as interviews and topical news articles.

Maintain a live feel to the podcasts, and inject personality.

Recording the podcast with minimal editing dramatically reduces the work for the producer and creates a dynamic mood for the episode. Research at the University of Leeds found that "the overwhelming majority of students rejected the idea that pre-recorded lectures could be used in place of the traditional lecture".Students preferred to use podcasts as a means of reviewing or revising what had already been discussed in lectures. The Open University was the first to reach 20 million downloads since starting to use iTunesU in 2008 – with mobile phones increasingly used to download their tracks.

Martin Bean, Vice-Chancellor of the Open University:

“The growth of the iTunesU concept reflects the changing ways that people are learning.The way people want to learn is changing. Many now actively seek out content they are interested in and which they can watch, read or listen to when it suits them. New channels are helping people to fit learning in with their lifestyles.” Preston College is a good example of a comparable UK institution who have used iTunes U Keep podcasts short and to the point – 15 minutes per week is probably about right for most students unless the podcast is expected as part of the contact time for the course. Use a system such as RSS to push the information out to students; this is likely to result in a higher uptake than if they students have to manually download the files. Be aggressive in overcoming technical problems at the start, such as making sure files are easy to download both on-campus and at home. Apart from the initial overhead of setting up the recording system and background music, the time taken to produce a podcast will not be much longer than the podcast itself.

Do not be surprised or concerned about low response-rates to requests for feedback in the podcasts. This is a known phenomenon for the podcast medium. More than 800 universities have active iTunes U sites. About half of these institutions — including Stanford, Yale, MIT, Oxford, and UC Berkeley — distribute their content publicly on the iTunes Store. iTunes is installed on nearly 30 percent of all computers worldwide, making it the most widely installed music store application in the world.
iTunes Store is No. 1 music vendor in the US since 2008

iTunes U content is access through the iTunes interface.
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