Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Conforming to the Norm & The Chameleon Effect

Social Psychology small group project (C Block)
by

Alice Rain

on 11 January 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Conforming to the Norm & The Chameleon Effect

Conforming to the Norm
&
The Chameleon Effect by Alice, Lauren, and Sophie Chameleon Effect Background Findings/Summary Relevance Key Info Relevance Today Solomon Asch
&
Conforming to the Norm original research conducted by Solomon Asch (1951), Swarthmore College, U.S.
Asch was born in Poland and heavily influenced to explore socially-oriented approaches to perception, learning, thinking, etc.
Asch worked and taught at Swarthmore for 19 years, focusing on the balance between social and natural science
led to his famous experiment in conformity, which tested the differences between physical and social reality participants were shown cards with different-sized lines on them and asked to judge which one was closest in size to a given line
answer was clear, but when all the previous "participants" (actually confederates of the researcher) gave the wrong answer, 32% of participants conformed to it
over 12 trials, 75% of participants conformed at least once studies performed by Chartrand and Bargh, New York University, 1999
Bargh influenced by PhD adviser, Robert Zajonc, when studying processes underlying behavior, including affect and cognition People automatically copy others
Mimicry increases liking
Empathy people mirror the actions of others more often
People with high perspective-taking (the degree to which people naturally take others' perspectives) were more likely to mimic The chameleon effect functions as a social cohesive and facilitates social interactions. It is a subconscious reaction to social interaction that increases likeability and helps society to function smoothly. One Interesting Thing Chartrand is a Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. Her research interests focus on the nonconscious processes influencing emotion, cognition, and behavior. The Chameleon Effect is a kind of weak hypnosis because hypnosis is an extreme version of mimicry Findings/Brief Summary participants were shown cards with different-sized lines on them and asked to judge which one was closest in size to a given line
answer was clear, but when all the previous "participants" (actually confederates of the researcher) gave the wrong answer, 32% of participants conformed to it
over 12 trials, 75% of participants conformed at least once showed that the majority of people will conform to the larger group, either because they really believe the group is correct or because they're afraid to be different
collaboration is really important in school and work today
important to be aware of the effects that conformity may have on coming to a group agreement
ex. even if it seems like the whole group agrees, members might have better ideas that they just aren't sharing because they're afraid/think they're wrong
Full transcript