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Speak Unit Plan- Laurie Halse Anderson

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Krystal VanDuysen

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Transcript of Speak Unit Plan- Laurie Halse Anderson

Theme
Speak
By: Laurie Halse Anderson
July 8, 2015
On the back cover of Speak, Melinda introduces herself.

“I wasted the last weeks of August watching bad cartoons. I didn’t go to the mall, the lake or the pool, or answer the phone. I have entered high school with the wrong hair, the wrong clothes, and the wrong attitude. And I don’t have anyone to sit with.

I am an outcast”

Melinda is very stressed, and, in Speak, we will learn why and what she does about it.

When stressed or overwhelmed, some students exercise, read, write, draw or take on other extracurricular activities.
Free write on some ways in which you deal with stress, hurt feelings, or other negative experiences. Which activities do you feel are the most effective? How do they help?

Do Now: Journal Entry
Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 3-12 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
Standards:
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Text Dependent Questions
pgs. 3-12
Grammar & Language

Spotlight

1. What happens in the cafeteria that makes Melinda run out of the lunchroom? Cite your text evidence.

Claim:

Evidence:

Sanctuary

2. How is Melinda’s attitude in her art class different from her attitude towards her other classes? Give at least three details from the text to support your answer.

Claim:

Evidence:

3. Describe the globe Mr. Freeman uses in his class, and explain how he uses it.

Claim:

Evidence:






Exit Ticket
What are your first impressions of Melinda? What types of characterization has the author used to make you come to this conclusion?
In your journals...
July 9, 2015
Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 13-20 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
Standards:
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Grammar & Language
Text Dependent Questions
Home. Work.

4) How does Melinda’s family communicate? Give a specific example from the text. Cite your text evidence.

Claim:

Evidence:








Exit Slip
In your journals...
Power Vocabulary
What were some of the signs that show Melinda may be depressed?
July 7, 2015
Do Now: Interest Inventory
Objectives:
Students will be able to review the major literary elements of the novel (characters, plot, theme, setting, conflict) by taking notes and watching a trailer for the novel. In addition, students will be able to complete an Identity Project at the end of the period.
Standards:
W.9-10.9- Write routinely
SL.9-10.1- Participate in discussions
July 6, 2015
Do Now: Note Card
Objectives:
Students will be able to read and understand the syllabus for English 9/10 Summer School session as well as complete introduction activities (journal entry, anticipation guide, questionnaire) for Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson.
Standards:
July 10, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
In the last section we read about Melinda’s room.

Describe your own room using sensory details in a one paragraph entry.

Is it anything at all like Melinda’s room? How is it different?
Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 20-30 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
Standards:
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Grammar & Language
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Slip
Burrow

5) Describe Melinda's new hiding place at school. Cite your text evidence.

Claim:

Evidence:



Devils Destroy

6) What did Melinda do that has caused everyone in school to hate her?

Claim:

Evidence:




Compare Melinda and Heather at this point in the novel. How are the similar? different?
In your journals...
Syllabus
Classroom Procedures
Journal #1
Anticipation Guide/ Questionnaire
Characters
Setting
Conflict
Major Themes
July 13, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 39-53 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
Standards:
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Grammar & Language
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Slip
W.9-10.9 - Write routinely
Agenda
• Introductions
• Hand out materials (journals, folders)
• Syllabus Overview
• Classroom Procedures
• Speak Background
Journal
Anticipation Guide
Questionnaire

Exit Slip
The story
Speak
takes place during the main character’s freshman year of high school. List some challenges that you believe all students face when they begin a new year of school.
Name
Address
Parent Contact
Name
Phone Number
http://prezi.com/ps8ctibdo-il/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy
List one goal you have for this summer. (This doesn't have to be school related).
Identity Project
Please complete the Interest Inventory handout. This will help you during a later project.
Agenda

Do-Now: Journal/Discuss
Introduction to Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson Notes
Identity Tree Project

Melinda Sordino

High school freshman
Protagonist
In the beginning, we know something happened to Melinda during a party in the summer
Due to her trauma and inability to tell anyone about what happened, Melinda spirals into a dark depression; loses her ability to speak with ease; and can express her pain only through physical acts, such as biting her lips and nails.
Melinda's introspection and dedication to her art allow her to grow and eventually see herself as a survivor rather than a victim.
She learns that the only way to counter evil is to speak out against it.
M
E
L
I
N
D
A
H
E
A
T
H
E
R
A new girl from out of town
Opposite of Melinda in many ways.
Unlike Melinda, Heather does not accept her role as outcast and does her best to win popularity by ingratiating herself with various groups at school.
She is self-centered and unable to see that she uses Melinda (the same way Melinda uses Heather) to avoid facing the fact that they're both friendless.
Heather fails to grow, however, and while Melinda is able to reconnect and create genuine friendships, Heather continues to try to win people's favor through superficial means.
M
R.

F
R
E
E
M
A
N
Melinda's art teacher
Serves as a role model for her on how to use art to express and deal with difficult emotions.
Minor Characters
Rachelle
Mr. Neck
David Petraikas
Merryweather High School

Syracuse, New York

This location is most significant because of the weather, which Melinda Sordino is very tuned in to.
(Initial Situation)
Melinda's old friends want talk to her, and she has some kind of secret.

When we meet Melinda on the first day of her freshman year, we know that all her ex-friends and a bunch of other kids are really mad at her. She also hints that something awful has happened to her, and she wants to tell somebody about it but can't.
Language & Communication
Isolation
Violence
Education
Friendship
Sadness
Transformation
Guilt & Blame
Major Symbol
Tree
Identity Tree Assignment


In Speak, Mr. Freeman assigns Melinda’s art class a year long project to construct a random object in whatever means they choose. Melinda is assigned a tree. As the novel progresses, the tree will come to symbolize Melinda’s growth as a person and become a symbol for her identity.

Your assignment is to construct a tree that represents your identity.

• Use clippings from magazines, newspapers, or any other print ads to create your tree.
• Examples of possible clippings include pictures, words, or small 3D items.
• Select items that represent who you are; what constitutes your identity.
• Please be creative in this assignment and use it to help discover what makes you who you are.

**You must also include a 5 paragraph Autobiographical Essay using the outline provided.

This will be counted as a summative assessment!

Do Now: Journal Entry
Mr. Neck, Melinda’s social studies teacher, doesn’t appear to like her and he even tells her, “I knew you were trouble the first time I saw you.”

He doesn’t give her the chance to prove that she is a good student.

Have you ever experienced this sort of treatment from a stranger? How did it make you feel and how did you handle the situation? How can first impressions be misleading? Why should you not judge people before you know them?
Action Verbs
Agenda

Do-Now: Journal/Discuss
Grammar & Language- Nouns/Pronouns
Power Vocabulary- Using Context Clues
Reading Strategy- Elements of Fiction
Read pgs. 13-20 with post-its
Text Dependent Questions
Graphic Organizer
Exit Slip

Agenda

Do-Now: Journal/Discuss
Grammar & Language- Action Verbs/Linking Verbs
Power Vocabulary- The prefix -im
Reading Strategy- Point of View 1
Read pgs. 13-20 with post-its
Text Dependent Questions
Graphic Organizer
Exit Slip

Agenda

Do Now: Journal 4/Discuss
Grammar & Language- Adjectives & Adverbs
Power Vocabulary- Word Families
Reading Strategy- Point of View 2
Read pgs. 20-30 with post-its
Text Dependent Questions
Graphic Organizer
Exit Slip

Elements of Fiction
Graphic Organizer
Let's Practice!
Point of View
Graphic Organizer
Graphic Organizer
Theme Development
At the pep rally, Melinda describes students pulling her hair and kneeing her in the back after they find out that she is the student who called the police at the summer party. She even says that she is “accidentally knocked down three bleachers” at the end of the pep rally.

Have you ever witnessed an act of bullying? If not, can you think of a story or movie where someone was bullied? Describe the situation and how it was handled.

Prepositions
Agenda

Do Now- Journal Entry 5
Grammar & Language- Prepositions/Conjunctions (L.9-10.2)
Power Vocabulary- Using Reference Skills
Reading Strategy- Dialogue
Read pgs. 30-39
Text Dependent Questions
Graphic Organizer
Exit Slip
Graphic Organizer
Theme Development
Cheerleaders

How does Melinda feel about the cheerleaders? (not in your handout)

Claim:

Evidence:


Choose one adjective to describe Melinda. Explain why you chose this adjective by using examples from the text.
July 14, 2015
Do Now: Journal # 6
At the end of the “First Marking Period” section of Speak, (which we will read today) Melinda writes that she sees IT in the hallway and tells the reader that IT is her nightmare and she can’t wake up.

Freewrite on what you think IT is and why Melinda calls IT her nightmare.

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 39-46 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Agenda

Do Now- Journal Entry
Grammar & Language: Compound Subjects & Predicates/ Indirect Objects
Power Vocabulary- Unit 1 Exam
Flashback (R.L.9-10.3)
Read pgs. 39-46 (end of MP 1)
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Slip
Grammar & Language
Grammar & Language
Reading Strategy
Text Dependent Questions
7) What book does Melinda read on Halloween instead of going trick-or treating?

Claim:


Evidence:
Review questions so far.
July 15, 2015
Do Now:Journal Entry
Melinda creates a “secret place” in an old janitor’s closet which she begins to decorate with older posters.

• Compare and contrast her “secret place” to another character’s in any book/movie you’re familiar with.

• You may even compare it to a real-life “secret place” you, a friend, or a sibling once had.

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 49-57 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Agenda

• Do-Now: Journal/ Discuss
• Grammar & Language- Object & Subject Complements
• Power Vocabulary- Using Synonyms
• Reading Strategy- Foreshadowing
• Kahoot Quiz/ Read pgs. 49-57 of Speak
• Text Dependent Questions
• Exit Slip

Grammar & Language
Object Complements
Let's Practice!
Grammar & Language
Subject Complements
Text Dependent Questions
8) The school has decided to change the school mascot four times. List all three of the previous mascots that have been used and explain why the school felt they had to change each one.

Claim:

Evidence:

9) What author has the school district banned from the school library?

Claim:

Evidence:

10) Explain why David Petrakis walks out of Mr. Neck’s class. Give enough details in your answer to fully explain why he is upset.

Claim:

Evidence:

Graphic Organizer
Character Analysis
Exit Slip
July 16, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
During Job Day, Melinda and her friends take tests to determine their future careers. Heather’s results tell her that she is suited to be a nurse, while Melinda’s results state that she could pursue a career in forestry, firefighting, communications, or mortuary science.

• How much thought have you given to your future?
• What are your plans after you graduate high school, and where do you see yourself in ten years?

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 57-65 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Agenda

Do Now: Journal #8/ Discussion
Grammar & Language-Prepositional Phrases/Appositives
Power Vocabulary (R.L.9-10.4) (L.9-10.4) (L.9-10.6)- Prefixes Meaning Not
Kahoot
Exit Slip
Nouns
Lesson 1- Using Context Clues
Reading Strategy
Elements of Fiction
Grammar & Language
Pronouns
Pronouns
can take the place of nouns, groups of words acting as nouns, or other pronouns.

Interrogative
pronouns are used to form questions.
Who
is the best athlete on the team?
Whatever
do you mean?

Relative
pronouns introduce subordinate clauses
Rene,
who
is from Paris, drives a Porsche.
The house,
that
we spoke about has been sold.
Give the trophy to
whomever
you choose.
Let's Practice!
Unit 1:
How you react when faced with physical or emotional damage can often mean the difference between life and death. The words in this lesson relate to matters of life and death.
Word List:
- commemorate - eulogy - predator - sustenance
- dire - immortality - quarry - vital
- epitaph - longevity
When you come across an unfamiliar word when reading, you can often use clues from the "context," the sentence or paragraph in which it appears, to figure out the word's meaning.
Let's Practice!
5 Elements of Fiction
Setting
- time and place in which the events of a literary work occur
Characters
- the people, animals or beings in the work
Theme
- main idea or message a literary work conveys
Point of View
- relationship of the narrator or storyteller to the story
Conflict
- the struggle between opposing forces in the plot of the story
Let's Practice!
Complete the Elements of Fiction Graphic Organizer for
Speak
.
Setting
Characters
Point of View
Theme
Conflict
Action verbs
describe physical or mental action.
jog
smile
point
think
worry
Transitive verbs
are action verbs followed by words that answer what? or whom?
Jack
made
his own wedding cake. (The words
wedding cake
follow the transitive verb
made
and answer the question
made what?
)
Intransitive verbs
are also action verbs, but they are not followed by words that answer
what?
or
whom?
Condors l
ive
in the Andes. (The intransitive verb
live
is followed by the words
in the Andes
, which tell
where
, not
what
or
whom.
)
Power Vocabulary
The prefix im-
A prefix is a syllable placed before a root or base word to change or add to it's meaning.
Some prefixes have more than one meaning.
For example, the prefix im- can mean "not," or it can mean "in," "within," or "into."
The vocabulary words in this lesson have the prefix im- and are related to the theme of justice.
Word List:
- immaterial - imperceptible - impervious - imprint
- impartial - impersonate - implausible - imprison
- impenitent - imperturbable

Synonyms are words with similar meanings.
Let's Practice!
Reading Strategy
Point of View 1
Point of View refers to the
narrator's perspective.
When a story is written from
first-person
point of view, the narrator is a character in the story who tells the story using the pronoun,
I
.
With
second-person
point of view, the narrator uses the pronoun
you
to address the reader directly.
With
third-person
point of view, the narrator is an outsider to the story who reports the events of the story to the reader. The narrator refers to the characters by name or by the pronouns he and she.
Let's Practice!

Adjectives
Let's Practice!
Power Vocabulary
Word Families
A word family is made up of words that have a common origin or root.
Many words in the English language trace their roots to Greek or Latin.
The vocabulary words in this lesson belong to two Latin word-families -claudere, meaning "to close," and strictus meaning to "bind."
All of the vocabulary words are related to the theme facing limitations.
Word List:
- cloister - enclosure - preclude - strain
- close - exclude - restrict - stricture
- constricting - exclusion
Reading Strategy
Point of View 2
In a story with third-person omniscient, or all knowing, point of view, the narrator stands outside the story and comments on the action.
Nouns
name people, places, or things or ideas
grandfather
kitchen
peacock
vegetarianism
Proper Nouns
name particular people, places, things or ideas. Proper Nouns are always capitalized.
William Loman
Zaire
Islam
Machu Picchu
Concrete Nouns
identify objects that are tangible or can be identified through the senses.
hoof
fog
yawn
melodies
Collective Nouns
name groups of people. The singular form is sometimes considered singular and sometimes considered plural.
committee
choir
(a) pride (of lions)
Abstract Nouns
name ideas, qualities, or characteristics
fear
love
spirit
kindness
Let's Practice!
Grammar & Language
Linking Verbs
Linking verbs
connect the subject of a sentence with words or groups of words that identify or describe it
All forms of the verb
be
can function as linking verbs.
Tomorrow
will be
bright and sunny.
Oro
is
the Spanish word for gold.

Below are some other commons linking verbs.

- seem - remain - feel
- appear - smell - look
- become - taste - sound

Let's Practice!
* Review Elements of Fiction Practice
Adjectives
modify nouns and pronouns
eerie
room
some
people
latest
fad
Many adjectives have comparative and superlative forms.
hot, hotter, hottest
sharp, sharper, sharpest
psychic, more psychic, most psychic
The adjectives a, and, and the are called articles
Proper adjectives are formed from proper nouns and are always capitalized
Italian
opera
Dutch
tulips
Buddhist
thought
Grammar & Language
Adverbs
Adverbs
modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs
run
quickly
quite
nicely
deeply
embarrassed
Adverbs answer the questions when? where? how? and to what degree?
when?
soon
where?
there
how?
carefully
to what degree?
completely
Adverbs always precede the adjectives and other adverbs they modify.
rather
handsome
just
barely
Their position in relation to verbs can vary.
I disagree with you
completely
.
I
completely
disagree with you.
I disagree
completely
with you.
Let's Practice!
Prepositions
show relationships of nouns and pronouns to other words in the sentence. These relationships often indicate space or time.
in
the closet
after
lunch
during
the dance
outside
the perimeter
since
yesterday
from
the government
Compound prepositions consist of more than one word
according to
the law
on top
of Old Smokey
out of
the ordinary
Prepositions begin phrases that conclude with a noun or pronoun, called the
object of the preposition
.
A wounded deer stood
in front of the car
A box
of antique jewelery
sat
on the trunk.
Let's Practice!
Grammar & Language
Conjunctions
Subordinating conjunctions
join two clauses so that one clause depends grammatically upon the other.
The clause introduced by the subordinating conjunction is called a
dependent clause
. It cannot stand alone as a sentence.
As far as I'm concerned, you have the job. (
As far as
is the subordinating conjunction.
As far as I'm concerned
is a dependent clause.
Reading Strategy
Dialogue
Dialogue is the exact words spoken between characters.
It reveals characters' personalities and brings them to life by showing the reader what they are thinking and feeling.
Dialogue can also give the reader information about what is happening in the plot.
Compound Subjects & Predicates
Two or more simple subjects connected by a conjunction make up a compound subject.
Compound subjects
share the same verb.
Bali
,
Malta
, and
Grenada
are islands.
Neither
Bali
nor
Malta
is located in the Caribbean Sea.
Two or more verbs or verb phrases connected by a conjunction make up a
compound predicate.
Compound predicates share the same subject.
The wind
howled
and
cried
as if it were human.
Karla simultaneously
juggled rolling pins
,
danced the jitterbug
, and
sang an aria
from Madama Butterfly.
Indirect Objects
Complements
are groups of words that make the meaning of a verb complete.
Indirect objects
are complements that answer the question for what? for whom? or to whom? after an action verb.
Bill baked
Maria
a birthday cake. (for whom did Bill bake?)
Porter gave
the homeless man
his last dollar. (To whom did Porter give his last dollar?)
Juditha mailed
the recruiting office
her completed application. (To whom did Juditha mail the application?)
Only sentences with direct objects can have indirect objects.
Flashback
In a fictional passage, when a character pauses to remember something that happened prior to the current action, this is called a
flashback.
The purpose of a flashback is to make a comparison between the present action and something that happened in the past, or to provide additional background information about the characters.
This technique may also add suspense to the narrative.
Halloween
Reading Strategy
Flashback
Find an example in the text where Melinda has a flashback. How does this add meaning to the story?
Exit Slip
Make a prediction for Second Marking Period.
An object complement follows a direct object and describes or identifies it by answering the question what? Object complements can be adjectives, nouns, or pronouns.
He thought the trial
useless
. (adjective)
They named her
Queen for a day
. (noun)
Consider the job
yours
. (pronoun)

Object complements often are used with the following verbs:

- think - call - find - appoint
- elect - make - name - choose

Subject complements describe or identify subjects.
Predicate nominatives are subject complements that identify the subject.
Predicate nominatives are usually found after forms of the verb be, but they can also follow certain other linking verbs such as
remain
and
become
.
Kiri Te Kanawa is a Maori.
She has become a diva.
Predicate adjectives are another kind of subject complement. Predicate adjectives describe the subject and can follow any linking verb.

Power Vocabulary
Using Synonyms
Void, abyss, chasm- all these words suggest a hole, nothingness, something missing. Filling a void in one's life often leads to a fulfillment of one's dreams. The words in this list relate to voids.

Word List
- avocation - fortuitous - privation - renaissance
- bereft - introspection - provisional - solace
- epiphany - melancholy
Reading Strategy
Foreshadowing
Foreshadowing is a device in which the writer places clues in a story to prepare the reader for events that are going to happen later.
Foreshadowing may clearly foretell an event or merely hint at it.
Foreshadowing can create a feeling of suspense, help draw a reader into the story, or add layers of meaning that are only fully revealed at the conclusion of a tale.
Grammar & Language
Prepositional Phrases
A group of words that begins with a preposition and ends with a noun or pronoun is called a prepositional phrase.
The noun or pronoun that follows the preposition is called the object of the preposition.
They began their project
with good intentions
. (
Intentions
is the object of the preposition
with.
)
Prepositional phrases can act as adjectives.
Have you ever had a room
with a view
? (With a view modifies the noun room.)
They can also act as adverbs.
At noon they met in secret. (
At noon
and
in secret
modify the verb met.)
Grammar & Language
Appositives
Appositives are placed next to other nouns and pronouns and give extra or identifying information about them.
My dog,
Ariel
, is an Australian shepherd.
Appositives of more than one word are called
appositive phrases
.
His fiance, a civil engineer, was transferred.
An appositive should be set off with commas unless it is necessary to the meaning of the sentence.
Toni Morrison's novel
The Bluest Eye
has been the topic of such serious discussion. (Since Morrison wrote more than one novel, the appositive is necessary to the meaning of the sentence.
Kahoot
First Marking Period
In partners/groups, go to Kahoot.it and enter the game pin from the board.
Choose an appropriate nickname.
Answer the questions to the best of your ability!
Exit Slip
July 17, 2014
Do Now: Journal Entry
In your journals, choose five out of the twenty words from the vocabulary handouts and create original sentences. Try to include context clues in each sentence.

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 57-65 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Agenda:

Do Now: Journal/ Discussion
Grammar & Language- Participles & Participial Phrases/Gerunds & Gerund Phrases
Power Vocabulary- Words formed from the root -videre
Reading Strategy- Irony
Read pgs. 57-65 of
Speak
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Slip
Grammar & Language
Participles & Participial Phrases
A
participle
is a verb form that can function as an adjective
The
dripping
faucet kept us awake all night. (dripping modifies the noun faucet)
Present participles always end in -ing. past participles often end in -ed but can take other forms as well.
The motorcycle's
roaring
engine shook the windows.
The
muted
notes came from a
hidden
speaker.
A
participial phrase
contains a participle plus any complements and modifiers.
Running at great speed
, the deer escaped the wolf. (phrase modifies noun deer)
Chris,
smelling smoke from the basement
, called the fire department. (phrase modifies noun Chris)
The photographer,
determined to get a picture of the comet
, stayed awake all night. (phrase modifies noun photographer)
Grammar & Language
Gerunds and Gerund Phrases
A gerund is a verb form that ends in -ing and is used in the same way a noun is used.
Walking is an effective and safe exercise. (gerund as subject)
My wife hates my singing. (gerund as direct object)
She has not thought about running. (gerund as preposition)
A gerund phrase is a gerund plus any complements and modifiers.
Bill's secret for good pies was putting the dough in the freezer for an hour. (gerund phrase as predicate nominative)
Power Vocabulary
Words Formed from the Root videre
A large family of words in English is derived from the Latin root -videre, which means to see. Study the list of vocabulary words to find those you already know. How do the meanings of these words relate to seeing?
- evident - video - vision - vista
- provident - visage - visitation - visualize
- supervise - visible
Reading Strategy
Irony
Irony is a contrast between appearance and reality.
Situational irony exists when the actual outcome of the situation is the opposite of what is expected.
Dramatic irony exists when readers are aware of circumstances in a story of which the characters have no knowledge.
Many authors use irony to heighten the drama of unfolding events.
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Slip
Wishbone

11) Describe the art project Melinda makes with the turkey bones.

Claim:

Evidence:


pgs. 57-65
July 20, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
In Speak, Melinda describes different instances of stereotyping: she mentions the cheerleaders and their reputation for being promiscuous and partying, Mr. Neck’s attitude towards immigrants, and the different ‘clans’ which exist at the school and whose members are assumed to share the same characteristics.

• Why do you think some people stereotype others by making assumptions about what a particular group is like?

• What are some common stereotypes that are made about your age group?

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 65-72 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Agenda:

Do Now: Journal/ Discussion
Grammar & Language- Infinitives/Simple & Compound Sentences
Power Vocabulary- Unit 2 Review
Reading Strategy- Style
Read pgs. 65-72 of
Speak
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Slip
Grammar & Language
Infinitives & Infinitive Phrases
Infinitives
are base forms of verbs preceded by the word to.
Infinitives can be used as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs.
To smoke
is prohibited. (
The infinitive to smoke is used as the subject.
)
Raphael loves
to cook
. (
The infinitive to cook is used as a direct object.
)
He had a longing
to escape
.(
The infinitive to escape is used an adjective.
)
He was too angry
to talk
. (
the infinitive to talk is used as an adverb.
)
Infinitive phrases include an infinitive plus all modifiers and complements.
It is easiest
to get there by plane
.
Grammar & Language
Simple & Compound Sentences
A simple sentence has one main clause.
The dog bit the trainer.
The dog and the cat
bit the trainer. (
simple sentence with compound subject.
)
The dog
bit and scratched the trainer
. (
simple sentence with a compound predicate
.)
The mangy dog and scruffy, yowling cat viciously bit and scratched the cruel, underpaid trainer.
(expanded simple sentence with compound subject, compound predicate, and modifiers.)
A compound sentence has two or more clauses joined by a coordinating conjunction or a semicolon.
The dog bit, and the cat scratched.
The dog bit; the cat scratched.
Power Vocabulary
Unit 2 Review
Complete the Review Handout
Create a Study Guide or note cards for yourself with the vocabulary words.
Reading Strategy
Style
The choices that a writer makes about words and sentences in a work determine style.
A writer may choose to use long or short sentences, formal or informal words, common or poetic descriptions, or any combination of these elements.
All these contribute to the style of the work and help reveal the writer's purpose and attitude.
Text Dependent Questions
pgs. 65-72
Exit Slip
July 21, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
During Christmas, Melinda becomes emotional when her parents give her art supplies. She is impressed that they noticed her new interest in drawing. She tries to tell her parents about her traumatic experience, but she is unable to. She asks herself, “How can I talk to them about that night? How can I start?”

• If you could talk to Melinda what different reasons would you give her for why you think she should talk to her parents?

• Provide suggestions that will encourage her to do so.

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 73-82 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Agenda:

Do Now: Journal/ Discussion
Grammar & Language- Adjective Clauses
Power Vocabulary- Unit 2 Exam
Reading Strategy- Tone
Complete Questions from Yesterday
Read pgs. 73-82 of
Speak
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Slip
First Amendment, Second Verse

12) Why does David Petrakis video his social studies class?

Claim:

Evidence:


Winter Break

13) Why is Melinda so overwhelmed by the Christmas gift her parents gave her?

Claim:

Evidence:


Why do you think it is so hard for Melinda to open up to her parents?
Grammar & Language
Adjective Clauses
An
adjective clause
modifies a noun or a pronoun and normally follows the word it modifies.
An
essential
, or
restrictive
clause is one that is necessary for the meaning of the sentence.
The person
who parked in the driveway
should move the car immediately.
A
nonessential
, or
nonrestrictive
clause contains information that is not necessary, for the meaning of the sentence and is set off by commas.
Katmandu,
which is the capital of Nepal
, is the home of many famous temples.
Power Vocabulary
Unit 2 Exam
Take 5 minutes to study your notes and prepare for the unit exam.
Do your best!!!
Reading Strategy
Tone
Tone is the writer's or speaker's attitude toward the subject of the passage.
Tone may be communicated through words and details that express particular emotions and that evoke and emotional response in the reader.
Text Dependent Questions
pgs. 73-82
Work on the questions from the last reading.
Don't forget to be using proper MLA.
".................................."(pg #).
July 22, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
Melinda’s friend Heather tells the Martha clan that Melinda will make posters for their activities. Melinda says to the reader, “How could I say no?” and makes the posters even though she doesn’t really want to.

• Write a journal entry that explains why you think she makes the posters anyway.

• Explain what you would do in this situation if you were Melinda.

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 82-92 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Agenda:

Do Now: Journal/ Discussion
Grammar & Language- Adverb Clauses/Nouns Clauses
Power Vocabulary- Using Synonyms
Reading Strategy- Hyperbole
Read pgs. 82-92 of
Speak
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Slip
Grammar & Language
Adverb Clauses
Grammar & Language
Noun Clauses
Power Vocabulary
Using Synonyms
Reading Strategy
Hyperbole
Exit Ticket
An
adverb clause
is a subordinate clause tha modifies a verb, an adjective, or an adverb and are introduced by one of the following or similar
subordinating conjunctions.

since
although
because
when
whenever
after
before
while
wherever
An adverb clause with some words left out is called
elliptical
. The ommitted words can easily be filled in because they are implied.
I have never heard a better pianist
than she (is).
Noun clauses
can perform any function that nouns can perform.
Whoever can sing well
may try out for the part. (subject)
She couldn't decide
which she liked best
. (direct object)
The argument caused a misunderstanding about
when the lights should have been turned off.
(object of a preposition)
Sometimes the
relative pronoun
used to introduce a noun clause is omitted.
I believe
that
the wallet belongs to you.
I believe the wallet belongs to you.
Reflection on past experiences helps to shape your present life.
For example, getting through a tough situation might have taught you a lesson that still helps you today.
Emotions you've experienced might help you to understand the feelings other people have.
You might have memories that occasionally make you feel confident, secure, angry, confused, or sad.
The words in the following list relate to looking back on life events.
Hyperbole is a device in which an author uses extreme exaggeration in order to emphasize a point or to create a humorous effect.
Text Dependent Questions
pgs. 82-92
Can It

14) Who is the “IT” Melinda refers to?

Claim:

Evidence:


July 23, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry

Melinda and Heather’s friendship becomes increasingly strained as Heather gets more involved with the Marthas. Furthermore, Heather doesn’t defend Melinda’s artwork when they insult her posters.


• Do you think Heather is being a true friend?

• Explain how you define friendship, what similarities you and your closest friend share, or how your friendship began.

• You can also choose to write an entry about a specific moment in your friendship which is special to you.

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 95-107 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Agenda

Do Now: Journal/ Discussion
Grammar & Language- Four Kinds of Sentences
Power Vocabulary-The Latin root -mille
Reading Strategy- Archetype
Kahoot- Second Marking Period
Read pgs. 95-107 of
Speak
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Slip
Grammar & Language
Four Kinds of Sentences
A
declarative
sentence makes a statement and ends with a period.
The sun rises in the east.
An i
mperative
sentence also ends with a period, but it gives a command.
Tell me what you see.
An
interrogative
sentence asks a question and ends with a question mark.
Why on earth did he do that?
An
exclamatory sentence
expresses strong emotion. It ends with an exclamation point.
Bring me the eggs now!
Power Vocabulary
The Latin Root mille
Many words have mille as their root.
The Latin root mille means "thousand."
Since the root part a word carries the word's main meaning, recognizing mille will help you understand the meanings of these words.
mile
milestone
milefleurs
millenium
milligram
milliliter
millimeter
millionaire
millipede
millisecond
Reading Strategy
Archetypes
An archetype is the basic pattern or model of a widespread idea or thing.
An archetype in a story can be a type of character or a type of plot that is universal.
This character or plot can appear in literature in many cultures.
For example, a story with a hero who goes quest, faces danger and obstacles, and prevails victoriously in the end contains both story and character archetypes.
Text Dependent Questions
pgs. 95-107
Cold Weather and Buses

15) What animal does Melinda compare herself to whenever she sees Andy?

Claim:

Evidence:


Lunch Doom

16) What reason does Heather give Melinda for no longer sitting with her at lunch?

Claim:

Evidence:


Exit Slip
July 24, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
The name of the football team in Speak is constantly being changed because someone is offended by it. When the football team’s name is changed from “Wombats” to “Hornets,” Melinda states, “I’m allergic to hornets.”

• What hidden meaning might this statement have? List some reasons why she may have said this.

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 107-118 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Agenda

Do Now: Journal/ Discussion
Grammar & Language- Sentence Fragments
Power Vocabulary- the Suffix -ous
Reading Strategy- Allusion
Read pgs. 107-118 of
Speak
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Slip
Grammar & Language
Sentence Fragments
Sentence fragments
are incomplete sentences that have been punctuated as complete sentences.
Fragments are sometimes caused by a missing subject.
Ran quickly to the store.
Will be dancing beautifully later today.
Fragments are also caused by missing verbs.
Bob and Luis in the ballpark at noon.
Often a fragment is formed by punctuating a subordinate clause as if it were a sentence.
Since I have been thirteen years old.
Although professional writers occasionally use them for effect, fragments should be avoided in writing.
Power Vocabulary
The Suffix -ous
Suffixes have their own meaning and can be added to the ends of word roots to create new words with new meanings.
The Latin suffix -ous is used to form adjectives that mean "having," "full of," or "identified by."
For example, -ous added to the word beauty forms the word beauteous, which means "having beauty."
The list below shows words that contain the -ous suffix.
analogous
audacious
capricious
harmonious
illustrious
malicious
suspicious
tempestuous
tenacious
vigorous
Reading Strategy
Allusion
An allusion is a reference in a work of literature to something from another piece of literature, art, music, or history.
The reference could be to a character, place, or situation.
Text Dependent Questions
pgs. 107-118

Cutting out Hearts

17) Who gives Melinda a Valentine card on Valentine’s Day?

Claim:

Evidence:


Exit Ticket
July 27, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
Throughout the story, Melinda describes the fear she experiences, which often results in paralysis, whenever she has an opportunity to discuss her experience with anyone.

• Why do you think Melinda has such a hard time speaking to her parents, guidance counselor, and principal when they confront her about her silence and poor school performance?
• What would motivate her to open up?
• Present at least two suggestions for how Melinda could feel more comfortable talking to people.

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 107-118 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Agenda

Do Now: Journal/ Discussion
Grammar & Language- Run-On Sentences
Power Vocabulary- Review for Unit 3 Exam
Reading Strategy- Symbolism
Read pgs. 107-118/ 116-126 of
Speak
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Slip
Grammar & Language
Run-on Sentences
Run-on sentences
are two or more sentences that have been written as one sentence.
Comma splices
, resulting when two main clauses are separated by a comma instead of by a period or semicolon, are the most common kind of run-on.
It's been such a long time, I can't tell you how happy I am to see you.
Two main clauses joined with no punctuation at all results in a run-on.
The reminder had been posted on the wall he didn't see it, though.
Run-ons also result when the comma before a coordinating conjunction that connects two main clauses is omitted.
Burkina Faso is its new name but many books still list it by its old name of Upper Volta.
Power Vocabulary
Complete the review for the Unit 3 exam.
Create note cards or a study guide for the vocabulary words in Unit 3.
Unit 3 Review
Reading Strategy
Symbolism
An author uses a symbol, such as an object, a person, a place, or an experience, to represent something else.
The thing represented is often abstract, but it can be concrete as well.
A symbol may have more than one meaning, and its meaning may change during the story.
Text Dependent Questions
Picasso

18) Melinda takes inspiration from Picasso in her tree drawing. What unique artistic method does she take from him and apply to her tree?

Claim:

Evidence:


Riding Shotgun

19) Who is the one person that Melinda speaks to?

Claim:

Evidence:


20) What is Melinda’s reward for going to all her classes for an entire week?

Claim:

Evidence:


July 28, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
Shopping for new clothes with her mother, Melinda critiques her body in the mirror and tells the reader about a movie where a woman is burned very badly and needs skin grafts – new skin which doctors use to replace old skin. Melinda asks, “What does it feel like to walk in a new skin,” and tells the reader, “I just need to hang on long enough for my new skin to graft.” This is an example of figurative speech, words which have a symbolic meaning instead of a literal one.

• Free write on what you think Melinda is really trying to say

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 116-126/ 127-137 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Agenda

Do Now: Journal/ Discussion
Grammar & Language- Regular/Irregular Verbs/Perfect Tenses
Power Vocabulary- Unit 3 Exam
Reading Strategy- Figurative Language
Read pgs. 116-126/ 126-137 of
Speak
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Slip
Grammar & Language
Perfect Tenses
The
present perfect tense
expresses either action that took place at an unspecified time or a condition that began in the past but continues into the present.
They
have performed
the experiment twice
Lillian Ogg
has lived
in the same house since she was born.
The
past perfect tense
expresses an action that was completed before another activity or time in the past.
They
had finished
by the time he arrived.
The
future perfect tense
indicates activity that will be completed before another activity or time int he future.
By the time she realizes it, I
will
already
have disappeared
.
Power Vocabulary
Unit 3 Exam
Take 5 minutes to study your words from Unit 3.
Do your best- this is a summative grade!
Reading Strategy
Figurative Language
Figurative Language
is used to describe and imply ideas indirectly
The expressions used are not literally true, but express truth beyond the literal level.
Figurative language appears most often in
poetry.
The two main types of figurative language are
simile
and
metaphor
.
A simile is a comparison using the words like, than, or as.
Example: hair smooth as silk.
A metaphor is a direct comparison.
Example: thoughts swimming lazily.
Text Dependent Questions
pgs. 127-137
Stupid, Stupid

21) Describe Melinda’s conflict over the party David Petrakis is throwing at his house to celebrate the basketball victory.

Claim:

Evidence:


A Night to Remember

22) What was Melinda’s initial reaction to Andy when he approached her at the party?

Claim:

Evidence:


Exit Slip
July 29, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
Look back into the book. Find at least four examples (total) of similes and metaphors and explain what is being compared.
Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 127-137 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1 W.9-10.10
R.L.9-10.2 S.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.3
Agenda

Do Now: Journal/ Discussion
Grammar & Language- Voice of Verbs
Power Vocabulary- Unit 4: Usage
Reading Strategy- Imagery & Motif
Read pgs. 126-137 of Speak
Text Dependent Questions- Hand in!
Exit Slip
Grammar & Language
Voice of Verbs
When the subject of the sentence is the performer of the action, the verb is in active voice.
In 1581, Sieur Juvigny invented the flageolot.
When the subject of the sentence is the receiver of the action, the verb is in passive voice.
The flageolet was invented by Sieur Juvigny.

Each verb tense has an active and passive form.
Power Vocabulary
Unit 4- Usage
What does the word adversity mean to you? People of all ages, in all parts of the world and in all walks of life experience hardships that test their physical and emotional strength.
The words in this lesson illustrate adversity in different ways.
afflicted
debilitate
disparage
falter
fugitive
jeopardy
mortality
refugee
turbulent
volatile
Reading Strategy
Imagery and Motif
Imagery
refers to words and phrases that create a picture that appeals to one or more of the reader's five senses.
A
motif
is a recurring idea, image, or group of images that unifies a work of literature.
Text Dependent Questions
Make sure all questions for "Third Marking Period" are answered using details for each claim and MLA to cite the evidence.
Exit Ticket
July 30, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
When Melinda tells the reader about part of her experience, she gets so upset that she bites her lip very hard. In a way, she reopens wounds that the incident gave her. This new injury and the symbolic link between the mouth and communication also illustrate Melinda’s difficulty talking about the incident and recovering from its effects. She can’t confront her attacker or ask for help from her friends or family.

• Write a letter to Melinda and tell her why she needs to talk about what happened. Give her some advice on how to overcome her fear and gain the courage to confront Andy or get help.

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 141-150 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.2
R.L.9-10.3
W.9-10.10
S.L.9-10.1
Agenda

1) Do Now-Journal Entry
2) Finish 3rd MP TDQ's
3) Vocabulary- Using Context Clues
4) Reading Strategy- Mood
5) Speak pgs. 141-150
6) Text Dependent Questions
7) Exit Ticket
Power Vocabulary
Using Context Clues
Adversity can make people stronger. Those forced to face hardships often find within themselves strengths and survival instincts they never knew they had.
Overcoming adversity can give people a sense of their own power and a greater understanding of human nature.
Words in the following list relate to the positive ways in which people deal with adversity.
console
conviction
fortitude
gall
infallible
mobilize
optimist
persevere
resilient
zealous
Reading Strategy
Mood
The mood of a passage is its emotional quality or atmosphere.
In poetry, the choice of words, the length of lines, the rhythm, and other elements all contribute to creating a certain mood.
In fiction, the setting often helps create the mood of a story.
Text Dependent Questions
pgs. 141-150
Spring Break

23) How does Ivy offer Melinda help?

Claim:

Evidence:


Genetics

24) Why does Melinda’s dad always take a taxi to the airport?

Claim:

Evidence:


My Life as Spy

25) Using details from the text, describe Melinda’s conflict over whether or not to warn Rachel about Andy.

Claim:

Evidence:


July 31, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
Melinda’s ex-best friend, Rachel, has started to date Andy, and Melinda worries that Andy will hurt Rachel as well. Melinda has to decide whether or not to warn Rachel about what Andy did to her at the party. She has difficulty making this decision because of the way Rachel mistreated her in the past, and she is also worried that Rachel will not believe her.

• Do you think Melinda should talk to Rachel and tell her what happened?
• What would you do in this situation?
• Explain your reasons for your decision.
Or
• Write about a character in a novel or movie who makes a difficult decision.
o What did the character decide?
o How was this decision reached?
o What were the consequences of the decision?
o Do you agree with the decision? Why or why not?

Objectives:
Exit Ticket
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 148-158 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.2
R.L.9-10.3
W.9-10.10
S.L.9-10.1
Agenda

Do Now- Journal Entry
Grammar & Language- Agreement with Linking Verbs
Power Vocabulary- The Latin root -crux
Reading Strategy- Sound Devices
Speak pgs. 148-158
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Ticket
Grammar & Language
Agreement with Linking Verbs
Power Vocabulary
The Latin Root -crux
Sometimes a predicate nominative (noun following a linking verb that restates or stands for the subject) is different in number from the subject.
In this situation the linking verb always agrees in number with the subject, not with the predicate nominative.


The topic of the lecture was whales.



Fireworks are his idea of entertainment.
Subject
Linking verb
Pred. Nom.
singular
singular
plural
The root crux means "cross." This Latin roote refers to the upright beam and crossbar used by ancient Romans for executions.
The cross also became the central religious symbol to Christians throughout the world.
This root influences the meaning of a variety of words, including the words in this lesson.
Because a root carries the main meaning of a word, you can figure out how words with the root crux are related to one another.
crucial
crucifix
crucifixion
cruciform
crucify
cruise
cruiser
crusade
crux
excruciating
Reading Strategy
Sound Devices
Sometimes writers use the sound of words for effect. Such techniques are called
sound devices.
There are four different types of sound devices.
alliteration
- the repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words (such as
the soft sound of slippers
)
assonance
- the repetition of vowel sounds (such as
the fingers knitted swiftly
)
consonance
- the repetition of consonant sounds within words or at the end of words (such as
the stamp of the damp campers
)
onomatopoeia
- the use of a word or phrase that imitates or suggests the sound of what it describes (such as
buzz, fizzle, and whisper
)
Text Dependent Questions
pgs. 148-158
My Life as Spy

25) Using details from the text, describe Melinda’s conflict over whether or not to warn Rachel about Andy.

Claim:

Evidence:


Thin Atmosphere

26) How does Melinda warn Rachel about Andy?

Claim:

Evidence:


No Justice, No Peace

27) What does Melinda do to get put in in-school suspension?

Claim:

Evidence:


August 3, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
Melinda ends up writing Rachel an anonymous note to warn her about Andy.

• Rewrite the note (reprinted below) in a way which you feel would have been more effective. You can also choose to make it anonymous.

Andy Evans will use you. He is not what he pretends to be. I heard he attacked a ninth grader. Be very, very careful.

A Friend

P.S. Tell Greta-Ingrid, too

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 158-168 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.2
R.L.9-10.3
W.9-10.10
S.L.9-10.1
Agenda

Do Now- Journal Entry
Grammar & Language- Case of Personal Pronouns
Power Vocabulary- Unit 4 Review
Reading Strategy- Personification
Speak pgs. 158-168
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Ticket
August 4, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
Melinda fakes being sick so that she can skip school and recuperate from all of the anxiety she has been suffering from. While watching TV, she imagines appearing on different talk shows and telling her story.

• How do you think a talk show host would respond?

• What would he or she advise Melinda to do?

• Write a short dialogue between the talk show host and Melinda.

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 168-176 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
Agenda

Do Now- Journal Entry
Grammar & Language- Capitalization of Sentences
Power Vocabulary- Unit 4 Exam
Reading Strategy- Exercise 1
Speak pgs. 168-176
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Slip
August 5, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
Happy that spring is coming and that it’s stopped raining, Melinda spends a whole morning cleaning up the yard and clearing leaves. Her father comes outside to thank her for her hard work, but Melinda still finds herself unable to speak to him. Right before he gets back in his car, she finally “rakes the leaves out of her throat,” breaks the silence, and asks him to buy flower seeds.

• Write a paragraph imagining that you are Melinda’s father, and record your response to and feelings about your daughter’s request.

• Would you be happy? Confused? Understanding? What could be the greater significance of the flower seeds?

Objectives:
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 176-186 by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
Agenda

Do Now/Journal Entry
Grammar & Language- Capitalization
Reading Strategy- Exercise 2
Speak pgs. 176-186
Text Dependent Questions
Exit Slip
August 6, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
After Andy asks Rachel to the prom, Melinda finds the courage to warn Rachel about Andy in person. Rachel is sympathetic toward Melinda until she finds out that Melinda is referring to Andy. She accuses Melinda of making things up out of jealousy.

• Free write your reaction to Rachel’s behavior.
• Explain what you think her reasons are for dismissing Melinda’s cry for help.
• Have you or someone you know ever refused to believe something in order to avoid a confrontation?

August 7, 2015
Do Now: Journal Entry
Melinda watches as the tree outside her room is cut, and she thinks that the tree is being killed. However, Melinda’s dad states that “By cutting off the damage, you make it possible for the tree to grow again.”

• Write a paragraph or two about how this statement also applies to Melinda.

Objectives:
R.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.2
R.L.9-10.3
W.9-10.10
S.L.9-10.1
Students will be able to perform a close reading of Speak, pgs. 186-end by completing a series of text dependent questions in order to analyze the characters, themes, conflicts, plot, and author's purpose.
R.L.9-10.1
R.L.9-10.2
R.L.9-10.3
W.9-10.10
S.L.9-10.1
Agenda

Do Now- Journal Entry
Read
Speak
pgs. 186-end
Finish Text Dependent Questions
Constructed Response Mini-Lesson
Constructed Response Independent Practice
Exit Slip
Text Dependent Questions
pgs. 186-end
Prowling

33) Where does Melinda go on her first bike ride?

Claim:

Evidence:


Post Prom

34) What happened between Rachel and Andy at the prom?

Claim:

Evidence:


Prey

35) The first time Melinda was raped she couldn’t find her voice and she couldn’t find the inner strength to fight back. How does she react when Andy attempts to rape her again?

Claim:

Evidence:





August 10, 2015
Do Now:
Study for the Final Exam!
Congratulations! You made it to the last week!
Full transcript