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The 12 Labors of Hercules Presentation

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Olivia Berglund

on 23 October 2012

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Transcript of The 12 Labors of Hercules Presentation

Olivia Berglund
10/21/2012
Western Civ. Pd. 4 The Twelve Labors of Hercules Apples of the Hesperides - Hercules had to bring Eurytheus the golden apples that belonged to Zeus
- Hera had given these apples to Zeus as a wedding gift, so surely this task was impossible (Perseus Project)
- Apples were guarded by a hundred-headed dragon named Ladon and the Hesperides, nymphs who were the daughters of Atlas
- On the way to the apples, Hercules met Prometheus, who stole fire from the gods and was to be forever tortured by Zeus
- Hercules ended Prometheus's torture, and in return Prometheus told Hercules where to find the apples and how to get them
- Hercules had to trick Atlas into getting the apples for him, while he held the wight of the world on his shoulders
- Hercules tricked Atlas into holding the sky again, and ran off with the apples
- Because the apples were sacred to the gods, they could not stay with Eurytheus
- Hercules had to return them to the goddess Athena Belt of Hippolyte - Hippolyte was queen of the Amazons (tribe of woman warriors)
- Hippolyte's belt was leather, given to her by Ares, god of war, because she was the best woman warrior
- Eurytheus wanted the belt for his daughter
Hippolyte asked Hercules why he had come, and she promised to give him the belt
- Hippolyta, queen of the Amazons, was willing to help Hercules but the goddess Hera interfered making the Amazons believe that he was going to abduct their queen (Roman Colosseum)
- Hercules killed Hippolyte during the battle and took the belt. Stymphalian Birds - The Stymphalian birds were a huge flock of man-eating birds with bronze beaks, claws, and wings that lived near Lake Stymphalus and were the pets of the god of war (Roman Colosseum)
- Hercules had to drive a large flock of them away from the townspeople
- The goddess Athena came to his aid and gave him a pair of noisemakers made by Hephaestus, god of the forge
- Hercules scared the birds out of the trees with the noisemakers, shot them with his arrows as they flew away Augean Stables - Hercules was required to clean out King Augae's stables, which held thousands of animals
- King Augeas owned more cattle than anyone in Greece (Perseus Project)
- Hercules agreed to clean out stables in one day if he could have a tenth of Augae's cattle
- Augae agreed
Hercules dug two trenches from nearby rivers through the stables, and the water flushed out the stables
- Augeas learned that Eurytheus was behind this, so he didn't keep his deal with Hercules The Nemean Lion - Hercules came to a town called Cleonae
- When his host offered to sacrifice an animal to pray for a safe lion hunt, Hercules asked him to wait 30 days (Perseus Project)
- Hercules set out to kill the Nemean Lion
- He couldn't use his arrows againt the lion- its fur was impenetrable
- He followed the lion to its cave and choked it to death
- Brought the carcass back to Cleonae
- King Eurystheus became scared of Hercules after he saw what he was capable of Horses of Diomedes - These were man-eating horses
- Hercules sailed to Bistonia with an army
- Overpowered the grooms
- Hercules killed Diomedes and founded the city of Abdera in honor of Abderos, a youth who died during the battle
- Hercules took the mares back to Eurytheus, who set them free
- The mares wandered around until eventually they came to Mount Olympos, the home of the gods, where they were eaten by wild beasts (Perseus Project) Cerynian Hind - Hind: female red deer that had golden horns and bronze hoofs, this deer was sacred to the moon goddess, Diana (Artemis in Greek form)
- Ceryneia is a town in Greece, about fifty miles from Eurystheus' palace in Mycenae (Perseus Project)
- Hercules pursued the deer for one year before he finally shot it with his arrows
- On his way back to Tiryns, he was met by Diana and Apollo
- Diana was angry, but took pity on Hercules when he told her about his situation
- Diana healed the deer, and Hercules brought it back to Eurystheus alive Lernaen Hydra - The Lernean hydra was a serpent-like sea monster that possessed numerous heads which when cut off two heads would grow in its place (Roman Colosseum)
- Hercules and his nephew, Iolaus, went to kill the nine-headed hydra in Lerna
- Hercules lured the hydra from its den by shooting at it with flaming arrows
- When one hydra head was destroyed, two more would grow back in its place
- When Hercules destroyed one head, Iolaus would burn the stump to prevent the growth of more heads
- Defeated the hydra and buried the heads Cattle of Geryon - Hercules journeyed to the end of the world, where Geryon kept a herd of red cattle
- Geryon was a three-headed monster with three bodies and a total of six arms (Roman Colosseum)
- Geryon fought Hercules just as he was escaping with the cattle
- Hercules killed Geryon
- On the way back, Hercules lost one of the cows and went searching for it
- King Eryx found it and kept it
- Eryx would only return the cow if Hercules beat him in a wrestling match
- Hercules beat the king three times and killed him
- Took back the cow
- Hera sent a gadfly to attack the cattle, and the herd scattered
- Hercules regrouped the cattle and brought them back to Eurytheus Erymanthian Boar - Erymanthian boar would terrorize the townspeople and destroy their land
-The Erymanthian boar was a great beast that had its lair on Mount Erímanthos (Roman Colosseum)
- Hercules chased the boar around a mountain
- The boar was frightened, and hid in a thicket
- Hercules drove the boar into deep snow with his spear
- Trapped the boar in a net and carried it back to Eurystheus Cretan Bull - The Cretan bull was sent to King Minos of Crete by Poseidon, god of the sea
- Bull ran wild and terrorized the people of Crete
- Hercules wrestled the bull to the ground and forced it back to Eurytheus
- It wandered around Greece, terrorizing the people, and ended up in Marathon, a city near Athens Cerberus - Hercules had to go to the Underworld to capture Cerberus, the guardian of the Underworld
- Cerberus was the three headed savage dog with a snake for a tail and snakes down his back like a mane (Roman Colosseum)
- Before going to the Underworld, Hercules went to the priest Eumolpus, who initiated Hercules into religious rites so he could be saved by having happiness while he was in the Underworld
- Hercules then went to the Underworld to find Pluto (Hades in Greek form), and ask him for Cerberus
- Pluto told Hercules he could take Cerberus if Hercules could overpower the beast with nothing but his strength
- Hercules wrestled Cerberus into submission
- Hercules brought Cerberus to Eurytheus, and was later returned safely and unharmed to Pluto 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 - The goddess Hera cursed Hercules and drove him insane
- Insanity caused Hercules to kill his own wife and six sons
- After his curse was lifted, Hercules prayed to the god Apollo for guidance
- Apollo told Hercules that he would have to serve Eurystheus, king of Tiryns, for twelve years as punishment
- Hercules had to perform twelve superhuman tasks for Eurystheus
- This myth demonstrates the idea of pathos- an appeal to the audience's emotion through Hercules's suffering, but eventually gaining reward (immortality) -After these twelve labors were completed and his twelve years of service were over, Zeus rewarded Hercules with immorality Daniels, Maria. Hercules Wrestling the Nemean Lion. 1977. Mississippi. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Hercules Slaying the Lernean Hydra. J. Paul Gerry Museum, Malibu. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Daniels, Maria. Hercules With the Hind of Ceryneia and the Goddess Athena. 1958. Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Daniels, Maria. Hercules Grabs the Boar’s Head and Raises His Club to Strike It. 1960. Harvard University Art Museums. Perseus. Web. October 2012. People Leading Cows. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Hercules and the Stymphalian Birds. Trustees of the British Museum, London. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Daniels, Maria. Hercules Ropes the Creran Bull. 1997. University Museums, Mississippi. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Daniels, Maria. Fallen Archer Trampled by Horses. Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Daniels, Maria. Amazon. 1997. University Museums, Mississippi. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Hercules, Geryon, the Dog Orthros. Antikensammlungen und Glyptothek, Munich. Perseus. Web. October 2012. The Hesperides in the Garden. Trustees of the British Museum, London. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Maria Daniels. Hercules and Cerberus. Musée de Louvre, Paris. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Citations: Information Photos: “The Labors of Hercules.” Perseus Project. Tufts University, September 2008. Web. October 2012. “The Twelve Labors of Hercules.” InfoPlease. Pearson Education, 2012. Web. October 2012. “12 Labors of Hercules.” Roman-Colosseum. Roman Colosseum, 2008. Web. October 2012. Daniels, Maria. Hercules Wrestling the Nemean Lion. 1977. Mississippi. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Hercules Slaying the Lernean Hydra. J. Paul Gerry Museum, Malibu. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Daniels, Maria. Hercules With the Hind of Ceryneia and the Goddess Athena. 1958. Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Daniels, Maria. Hercules Grabs the Boar’s Head and Raises His Club to Strike It. 1960. Harvard University Art Museums. Perseus. Web. October 2012. People Leading Cows. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Hercules and the Stymphalian Birds. Trustees of the British Museum, London. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Daniels, Maria. Hercules Ropes the Creran Bull. 1997. University Museums, Mississippi. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Daniels, Maria. Fallen Archer Trampled by Horses. Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Daniels, Maria. Amazon. 1997. University Museums, Mississippi. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Hercules, Geryon, the Dog Orthros. Antikensammlungen und Glyptothek, Munich. Perseus. Web. October 2012. The Hesperides in the Garden. Trustees of the British Museum, London. Perseus. Web. October 2012. Maria Daniels. Hercules and Cerberus. Musée de Louvre, Paris. Perseus. Web. October 2012.
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