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6.03 Calorimetry Lab Report

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Erichelle Goitia

on 9 September 2014

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Transcript of 6.03 Calorimetry Lab Report

Erichelle Goitia
6.03 Calorimetry Lab Report
Data Table P1
Measured mass of metal(aluminum): 27.776 g
Distilled water measurement: 26 mL
Distilled water temperature: 25.2 degrees C
Temperature of metal: 100.3 degrees C
Temperature of mixture: 38.9 degrees C
Calculations P1
q(water)= m x c x deltaT
m = 26g c= 4.18 x deltaT
deltaT= final temp - initial temp
delta T= 38.9-25.2= 13.7
26 x 4.18 x 13.7= 1488 Joules
Conclusion
0.222-0.210/0.210x100= 77% error
Calculations P2
qwater= m x c x deltaT
m = 24.2g c= 4.18 deltaT= 29.1-25.1= 4
24.2 x 4.18 x 4 = 404.62J
Data Table P2
Measured mass of metal(A): 25.605g
Distilled water measurement: 24.2 mL
Distilled water temperature: 25.1 degrees C
Temperature of metal: 100.2 degrees C
Temperature of mixture: 29.1 degrees C
Observations
The unknown metal with the highest temperature of mixture was metal B standing at 32.2 degrees C. Metal B had the same temperature of the metal as metal A which came in 2nd place for highest temp of mixture.
Experimental Error
When doing the experiment, there's a capacity in the lab of how much metal you can use. Using an excessive amount of metal can over throw your experiment. There's a capacity for a reason. You must also know how to read a thermometer. Not knowing the difference between Fahrenheit and Celsius can mess up your calculations. Another example could be if you use the wrong calculation for the specific heat capacity. You must know what every variable means in the calculation in order to get the right answer.
Measured mass of metal(copper): 27.776g
Distilled water measurement: 26 mL
Distilled water temperature: 25.1 degrees C
Temperature of metal: 100.4 degrees C
Temperature of mixture: 31.6 degrees C
Measured mass of metal(zinc): 27.776g
Distilled water measurement: 26 mL
Distilled water temperature: 25.1 degrees C
Temperature of metal: 100.3 degrees C
Temperature of mixture: 32.6 degrees C
Measured mass of metal(iron): 27.776g
Distilled water measurement: 26 mL
Distilled water temperature: 26 degrees C
Temperature of metal: 100.3 degrees C
Temperature of mixture: 32.6
Observations
I noticed that the metal with the highest temperature of the mixture was aluminum with a temp of 38.9 degrees C. Even though copper had the highest temp of the metal at 100.4 degrees C, it had the lowest temperature of the mixture.
Measured mass of metal(B): 25.605g
Distilled water measurement: 24.2 mL
Distilled water temperature: 25.1 degrees C
Temperature of metal: 100.2 degrees C
Temperature of mixture: 32.2 degrees C
Measured mass of metal(C): 25.605g
Distilled water measurement: 24.2 mL
Distilled water temperature: 25.1 degrees C
Temperature of metal: 100.3 degrees C
Temperature of mixture: 28.7 degrees C
Unknown Metals
-1488 J = 27.776g (38.9-100.3)
-1488J = 27.776(-61.4)
-1488J= -1705.44
0.872J/g*C = C
-404.62 = 25.605(29.1-100.2)
-404.62 = 25.605(-71.1)
-404.2 = -1820.51
C = -0.222J/g*C
The most probable identity of the unknown metal is tin with a heat capacity of 0.210. 0.210 is the number closest to the specific heat capacity of the unknown metal standing at 0.222.
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