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How to DBQ

The art of writing a DBQ - The New Deal
by

Jacob Gogan

on 14 February 2013

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Transcript of How to DBQ

Step 1 1. Carefully read the directions and historical context Step 1 Step 2 2. Read the essay questions, write it below, and keep it in mind when approaching each document Document Based Question (DBQ) Why do we DBQ? We DBQ because DBQs:
Are based on the CDE Social Studies Learning Standards, themes, and concepts.
Focus on critical thinking skills and ask students to make comparisons, draw analogies, and apply prior knowledge and learning.
Ask students to take positions on an issue or problem and support their conclusions.
Require students to look at issues from multiple perspectives.
Require student to apply skills they will use as adults in the real world. Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 2. Read the essay questions, write it below, and keep it in mind when approaching each document 7. Begin writing your 5 Paragraph Essay answering the question. 6. Before writing your essay you should create an outline or web in order to better organize your thoughts before writing a 5 Paragraph Essay. 5. After examining the documents, identifying Key Themes, and using ROI you should now change, edit, and/or revise your original thesis. 4. Investigate each document. Keep in mind the question, try to see if any Key Themes emerge, and use any Relevant Outside Information (ROI) to expand your thinking. 3. Create a tentative thesis statement that carefully includes the question in it. 1. Carefully read the directions and historical context Follow Directions Write down some notes on the historical context
FDR remembered as one of the greatest US Presidents
Guided nation through Great Depression and WWII
New Deal Program profoundly changed America
Various parts of the New Deal - Social Security, Federal Minimum Wage, Collective Bargaining, TVA, FDCI, etc.
FDR elected four times
Loved and Hated
Understand the critics Step 3 3. Create a tentative thesis statement that carefully includes the question in it. Step 4 4. Investigate each document. Keep in mind the question, try to see if any Key Themes emerge, and use any Relevant Outside Information (ROI) to expand your thinking. Step 5 5. After examining the documents, identifying key themes, and using ROI you should now change, edit, and/or revise your original thesis. Step 6 6. Before writing your essay you should create an outline or web in order to better organize your thoughts before writing a 5 Paragraph Essay. Step 7 7. Begin writing your 5 Paragraph Essay answering the question. Write the essay question down and commit it to memory: Mr. Gogan Examples

Although President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal policies aided many Americans during the Great Depression, many Americans opposed the New Deal for a variety of reasons.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal programs kick started the American economy during the Great Depression; however, many Americans opposed his New Deal programs. Some believed he went to far while others believed he did not do enough.

During the American Great Depression President Roosevelt changed the way government interacts with the economy. He ushered in a New Deal for the American people. Despite the New Deal's progress with putting unemployed Americans back to work and kick starting the stagnant economy, many Americans hated FDR and his New Deal policies. This political cartoon, “Pinched for Reckless Driving,” was published by the Chicago Tribune on June 3, 1935. Document 1 Document 2 Document 3 Document 7 Document 6 Document 5 Document 4 "I can realize that gentlemen in well-warmed and well-stocked clubs will [complain about] the expenses of Government because . . . their Government is spending money for work relief." President Roosevelt made this statement in November of 1935. U.S. Senator Huey Long, from Louisiana, became a vocal critic of FDR and of the New Deal during Roosevelt’s first term, in the depths of the Great Depression. Before being elected to the Senate, Long had served as governor of Louisiana. He had built a nationwide following among the poor for his vocal attacks on the rich and powerful. In 1932 Long formulate a “Share-The-Wealth” program, advocating very high tax rates on rich and on large inheritances to finance social programs to benefit the poor. By 1935, his program and his appeal made Long a political force throughout the nation. He planned to run for president in 1936 against FDR, but in September of 1935 he was assassinated. The following excerpt come from a radio speech Long made in January of 1935 that was later printed in the Congressional Record. We are in our third year of the Roosevelt depression, with the conditions growing worse . . .

We must now become awakened! We must know the truth and speak the truth. There is no use to wait three more years. It is not Roosevelt or ruin; it is Roosevelt’s ruin.

When I saw him [FDR] spending all his time . . . with the business partners of Mr. John D. Rockefeller, Jr. with such men as the Astors, etc., maybe I ought to have had better sense than to have believed he would ever break down their big fortunes to give enough to the masses to end poverty . . .
So there I call upon the men and women of America to immediately join in our work and movement to share the wealth.
1.The fortunes of the multimillionaires and billionaires shall be reduced so that no one person shall own more than a few million dollars . . .
2.We propose to limit the amount any one man can earn in one year or inherit to $1 million . . .
3.We will throw into the government Treasury the money and property from which we will care for millions of people who have nothing . . . we will provide a home and the comforts of home, with such common conveniences as radio and automobile, for every family in America, free of debt.
4.We guarantee food and clothing and employment for everyone who should work by shortening the hours of labor to thirty hours per week, maybe less, and to eleven months per year, maybe less . . .
5.We would provide education . . . for every child . . . through college and vocational education . . .
6.We should give a pension to all persons above sixty years of age . . .
7.We would grant a moratorium on all debts, which people owe that they cannot pay. In December 1935, Fortune magazine ran an article entitle “The Case Against Roosevelt.” Fortune, a magazine that general presented a pro-business viewpoint, was read by well-educated professionals and business managers. The following excerpt comes from this article. What the business grievance comes down to in the last analysis is that government of Mr. Roosevelt is a government of men and not of laws . . . the menace of dictatorship and the essence of dictatorship is government by personal will. What happens when a dictator, either fascist or communist, takes over is that a man or group of men undertake to make a direct attack on social and economic problems. The appeal of the dictator is: “Let us save ourselves! Let us act!” . . . the Roosevelt theory of federal administration in a menacing and dangerous thing. The following cartoon was printed in the June 1936 issue of Current History. Former president Herbert Hoover, who had been defeated by FDR in the 1932 presidential election, said the following in a speech given in October of 1936, in the closing days of that year’s presidential election. Through four years of experience this New Deal attack upon free institutions has emerged as the [most significant] issue in America. [This attack includes] . . . coercion and compulsory organization of men . . . great trade monopolies and price-fixing through codes . . . “economic planning” to regiment and coerce the farmer . . . national plans to put the government into business in competition with its citizens . . . current inflation . . . attempts to centralize relief in Washington for politics and social experimentation . . . In 1937, soon after his second inaugural, FDR proposed a law that aimed to change the makeup of the Supreme Court. During his first term, the court had ruled a number of New Deal programs to be unconstitutional. FDR, in an effort to reshape the court to make it more favorable to New Deal legislation, now proposed that he be allowed to appoint a number of new justices, expanding the size of the court. He presented it to the public as a reform, designed to reduce the workload of those justices over the age of 70. But Congress, and much of the public, opposed the “reform,’ and it never became law. The following is an excerpt from a public statement written in February 1937 by Frank Gannet, owner and publisher of a chain of newspapers. (This letter is filed in the records of the U.S. Justice Dept. See Teaching With Documents: Using Primary Sources From the National Archives.) President Roosevelt has cleverly camouflaged a most amazing and startling proposal for packing the Supreme Court. . . Increasing the number of judges from nine to fifteen would not make this high tribunal [court] act any more promptly that is does now, but it would give the President control of the Judiciary Department.

This proposal should give every American grave concern for it is a step toward absolutism and complete dictatorial power. Key Themes Relevant Outside Information (ROI) Work on your DBQ until there is 25 minutes left in class
P3 - 10:20
P6 - 12:50
P7 - 2:25 If you have any questions feel free to ask but you should be working diligently and quietly on your DBQ
Write Your 5 Paragraph Essay Question: Identify those groups that most strongly opposed the New Deal FDR Disrespect the Constitution
Private $ for Public Work Relief
FDR as a Dictator
"Economic Planning" Huey Long "Share-the-Wealth"
1937 Court Packing Bill
Liberty League
Hoover vs. FDR Ideologies
Hoover vs. FDR Quotes
Alphabet Agencies Intro (Paragraph 1)
Hook/Setting
Thesis - What is the essay going to cover?
Body
A. Topic Sentence (Paragraph 2)
Main Idea
Documents
ROI
Conclusion/Transition
B. Topic Sentence (Paragraph 3)
Main Idea
Documents
ROI
Conclusion/Transition
C. Topic Sentence (Paragraph 4)
Main Idea
Documents
ROI
Conclusion/Transition
Conclusion (Paragraph 5)
Restate Thesis -
Go Beyond/Look Forward/Cliffhanger #TodayinHistory #WordoftheDay - February 14, 2013

#TodayinHistory - 1962 First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy takes television viewers on a tour of the White House.
#TodayinHistory - 1929 Saint Valentine's Day Massacre: Seven people, six of them gangster rivals of Al Capone's gang, are murdered in Chicago, Illinois.
#TodayinHistory - 1849 In New York City, James Knox Polk (11th Pres) becomes the first serving President of the United States to have his photograph taken.
#WordoftheDay - mainor [MEY-ner] (noun) a stolen article found on the person of or near the thief
Example - Sacco and Vanzetti were killed because of who they were (anarchists). Neither men were ever found with a mainor, dollar, or gun. Learning Target -

a. Understand FDR's New Deal Policies
b. Identify those groups that most strongly opposed the New Deal
c. Feel confident for your test and essay this FRIDAY Agenda Agenda
I. WarmUp
II. #TodayinHistory/#WordoftheDay
III. DBQ Assignment
IV. Test Review
V. Last 5 Announcments Whatever you don't get done in class will be homework DUE FRIDAY Warm-Up How did the New Deal affect minority groups (women, African-Americans, and the elderly) and was everyone in agreement with the New Deal? If not, why not?
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