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Copy of Women and Femininity in TKM

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on 8 January 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Women and Femininity in TKM

By: Amy, Netra, & Deborah To Kill a Mockingbird: WOMEN AND FEMININITY SCOUT -influences her to associate femininity with weakness
-later, he advises her to conform to stereotypes Jem
-supportive throughout her conflicted period
-encourages her to be true to herself Atticus
-supports Jem's claims and excludes her
-assumes that he must treat her as more than a friend due to her gender Dill SCOUT Aunt
Alexandra - Forcefully takes on
the role of Scout's
mother
-Indirectly puts
pressure on Scout to
act like a lady Calpurnia -Scouts accepts her
as a motherly figure
-Encourages Scout to
fulfill the role of a
woman by inviting
her into the kitchen Ms. Maudie -Comforts Scout when
confronted by societal
expectations
-Helps Scout on her
journey to self
acceptance Ms. Caroline -Embodies the stereo-
type of the weak Southern
woman
-Hinders Scout's exploration
of knowledge because women
were discouraged from
high-level education - Her absence causes
Scout to associate less
with women
- This leads Scout to take
on more masculine
attributes Mother ANSWERS Before - Would rather be a boy than a girl -Has not developed sense
of independent thought - Follows society's and Jem's view - Saw women to be
restricted, had less rights
when compared to men After - Accepts her own ideas of femininity - Learns to conform to
society's stereotypes when necessary - Finds female role models to look up to, instead of male
ones - Does not fully understand the ways of women Evolution of Women: ANSWERS 1930s 1950s - Women were expected to be housewives
- Work field was restricted to nurses, waitresses, teachers
- In Great Depression, men felt threatened by women's expanding role
- In southern states, only minority of women were able to work outside of home - Transitional period for women
- Began to take on professions as businesswomen and lawyers
- Were not allowed to be in the Supreme Court
- Still social pressures to stay home and take care of children
- Had no choice but to be obedient to husbands * To Kill a Mockingbird was written in this time period * Harper Lee grew up during this period, novel was set in this time period - More equality in political and societal views
- Women are now allowed to be in juries
- Men and women have similar rights in all areas of law
- It is acceptable for women to pursue their own career
- However, society still discriminates against women's abilities 2000s Father Son(s) Daughter(s) Mother Patriarchal Family Pyramid (1930s) Significant Passages about Femininity: "Scout, I'm tellin' you for the last time, shut your trap or go home- I declare to the Lord you're gettin' more like a girl every day!" (Lee 51-2)
"Aunt Alexandra was fanatical on the subject of my attire. I could not possibly hope to be a lady if I wore breeches; when I said I could do nothing in a dress, she said I wasn't suppose to be doing anything that required pants." (Lee 81)





"'For one thing, Ms Maudie can't serve on a jury because she's a woman-'
'You mean women in Alabama can't-?' I was indignant.
'I do. I guess it's to protect our frail ladies from sordid cases like Tom's. Besides,' Atticus grinned, 'I doubt we'd ever get a complete case tried- the ladies'd be interrupting to ask questions.'" (Lee 221)






"'You know she's not use to girls,' said Jem, 'leastways, not girls like you. She's trying to make you a lady. Can't you take up sewin' or somethin'?'" (Lee 225)
"I wondered at the world of women...There was no doubt about it, I must soon enter this world, where on it's surface, fragrant ladies rocked slowly, fanned gently, and drank cool water." (Lee 233) } } Dominant Inferior Femininity Perception Web:
Scout's Point of View Male Influences Female Influences Characteristics Chart Activity:
Males vs. Females Males Females ANSWERS: Definition of Femininity

Qualities or traits associated with being a woman. - Commonly biased by society through stereotypes (Maycomb)
- Differs with individual perception Femininity: fem·i·nin·i·ty [fem-uh-nin-i-tee] Venn Diagram Activity:
Scout's Views of Femininity Harper Lee
Her Journey to Femininity Timeline Activity:
Evolution of Women To Kill a Mockingbird:
Tea Party Re-enactment Thematic Puzzle Activity: ANSWER: Societal values of femininity restrict a woman’s ability to accept her true self Sculpted Flower and Bird Analogy: - The "ideal woman" stereotype hinders a woman from being free to develop a true identity
- Society (sculpter) molds women (playdough flower) to be the same, perfect, and beautiful
- A bird whose wings are pinned down cannot fly Strong

Aggressive

Brave

Adventurous

Dominant Gentle

Innocent

Weak

Nurturing

Inferior Grew up in Monroeville, Alabama
Her mother was a mental patient
Closest childhood friend was a boy
Father was a lawyer
Was a tomboy, did not care for frivolous things
She did not approve of the stereotypes against women
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