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Pan With Us

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by

Elizabeth Dressler

on 8 April 2014

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Transcript of Pan With Us

Poetic Devices
Content
Roots of the Story
Mythology
Pan, the Greek God

Paganism
Before Christianity
Form
Pan with Us
by Robert Frost

Presented by
Elizabeth Dressler
& Callie Jane Vickers
Hindquarters, legs, and
horns of a goat in the
same manner as a faun
or satyr
He is the god of fields,
groves, and wooden glens;
because of this Pan is
connected to fertility and
the season of spring.
Furthermore, Pan is famous for his
sexual powers and is often depicted
with a phallus. He is often associated
with sexuality.
Giggity!


Let's read
the poem!!!
Pan with Us

Pan came out of the woods one day,--
His skin and his hair and his eyes were gray,
The gray of the moss of walls were they,--
And stood in the sun and looked his fill
At wooded valley and wooded hill.

He stood in the zephyr, pipes in his hand,
On a height of naked pasture land;
In all the country he did command
He saw no smoke and he saw no roof.
That was well! and he stamped a hoof.

His heart knew peace, for none came here
To this lean feeding save once a year
Someone to salt the half-wild steer,
Or homespun children with clicking pails
Who see no little they tell no tales.

He tossed his pipes, too hard to teach
A new-world song, far out of reach,
For a sylvan sign that the blue jay's screech
And the whimper of hawks beside the sun
Were music enough for him, for one.

Times were changed from what they were:
Such pipes kept less of power to stir
The fruited bough of the juniper
And the fragile bluets clustered there
Than there merest aimless breath of air.

They were pipes of pagan mirth,
And the world had fond new terms of worth.
He laid him down on the sun-burned earth
And ravelled a flower and looked away--
Play? Play?--What should he play?
5





10





15





20





25





30
Definitions
Zephyr:
A light wind
(line 6)
Juniper, bluets (lines 23, 24)
Sylvan:
of forest; relating to, typical of, or found in a forest (line 18)

The only God in Greek mythology that dies.
His pipes are
always with him
and are symbolic
of him.
pagan mirth:this flower
(line 26)
before
Christianity
amusement, esp.
expressed in laughter
Pun!
Group 1

Group 2
Group 3
Times were changed from what they were:
Such pipes kept less of power to stir
The fruited bough of the juniper
And the fragile bluets clustered there
Than there merest aimless breath of air.

They were pipes of pagan mirth,
And the world had fond new terms of worth.
He laid him down on the sun-burned earth
And ravelled a flower and looked away--
Play? Play?--What should he play?
Rhyming scheme:
AAABB
CCCDD
EEEFF

6 stanzas of 5 lines

Sing-Song Pattern

Pan came out of the woods one day,--
His skin and his hair and his eyes were gray,
The gray of the moss of walls were they,--
And stood in the sun and looked his fill
At wooded valley and wooded hill.

He stood in the zephyr, pipes in his hand,
On a height of naked pasture land;
In all the country he did command
He saw no smoke and he saw no roof.
That was well! and he stamped a hoof.
His heart knew peace, for none came here
To this lean feeding save once a year
Someone to salt the half-wild steer,
Or homespun children with clicking pails
Who see no little they tell no tales.

He tossed his pipes, too hard to teach
A new-world song, far out of reach,
For a sylvan sign that the blue jay's screech
And the whimper of hawks beside the sun
Were music enough for him, for one.
Group 3
Times were changed from what they were:
Such
pipes kept less of power
to stir
The
fruited
bough of the
juniper

And the
fragile

bluets
clustered there
Than there
merest aimless breath of
air
.

They were
pipes of
pagan mirth
,
And the
world
had fond new terms of worth
.
He laid him down on the
sun
-burned
earth
And ravelled a
flower
and
looked away--
Play? Play?--What should he play?
Group 2
His heart knew

peace,
for
none came here
To this lean feeding save
once a year
Someone to salt the half-wild steer,
Or homespun
children
with clicking pails
Who see no little they tell no tales.

He tossed his pipes, too hard to teach
A new-world song,

far out of reach
,
For a sylvan sign that the blue jay's screech
And the
whimper
of hawks beside the sun
Were
music enough for him
,
for one
.
Group 1

Pan came out of the
woods
one day,--
His skin and his hair and his eyes were gray,
The
gray
of the
moss
of walls were they,--
And stood in the
sun
and looked his fill
At
wooded valley
and
wooded hill.

He stood in the
zephyr,

pipes
in his hand,
On a height of
naked

pasture land
;
In all the
country
he did
command
He saw
no smoke
and he saw
no roof
.
That was well! and he
stamped a hoof.
Shows age of Pan: becoming old, dead, irrelevant
The woods is his home, his world, now he is leaving it
A
A
A
B
B

C
C
C
D
D
A
A
A
B
B

C
C
C
D
D
A
A
A
B
B

C
C
C
D
D
Nature images
Signs of people/followers
Pan's influence/power

Isolation

New World/Pan's irrelevance
Giving up/pathetic
Caesura:
A strong pause within a line of verse
Play? Play?--What should he play?
(line 30)

Allusion
References Pan,
Christianity

Mood
Tone
is passive
in the
obvious diminishing of Pan,
giving the reader a sense of
sadness, unsettling
New World/Pan's irrelevance
Fragility
Giving up, pathetic, hopeless

Nature
Depicts Pan's struggle with his loss of power,
individuality, and eventual retirement.

Depicts the change of religion from Greek mythology to new world religions.

Loss of magic in the world.

What does Pan represent in this poem?
In what ways does nature represent society?
How does Frost symbolize the loss of religion in this poem?

Creates intensity and musical interest
Personification/Symbol
Pan is a personification of nature and a symbol of the universe.

His retirement marks the end of magic and respect for the old world and its beliefs.
For you, Mrs. Irwin. Just enjoy it.

Guiding Questions
Full transcript