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Unit 3-Narrative

Unit 3 Narrative Text
by

Eric Russo

on 14 February 2014

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Transcript of Unit 3-Narrative

Lemon
Brown

UNIT 3
Plot
Characterization
Universal
Themes

Conflict
Monitor your Inner Voice
Objective:
Reader's
Response:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 1
POV
Setting
and
Mood

Plot and Conflict
Objective:
Reader's Response
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 2
Characterization
Objective:
Reader's
Response:
Lesson:
Work Period:
SRs:
Closing:
DAY 1
Point of View
Objective:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Exit Ticket:
DAY 1
POV
Objective:
Reader's
Response
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 2
Determining Importance
Objective:
Warm-Up:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 3
Setting & Mood
Objective:
Reader's Response
Lesson:
Work Period:
Closing:
DAY 1
Universal Themes
Objective:
SSR
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 2
Identifying Theme
Objective:
Reader's Response:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
DAY 1
Scholars will be able to apply reading strategies in order to summarize and synthesize a narrative.
Inner
Conversation =
Thoughts in
your head
I'm getting this!
I need some help.
Record your thoughts on a post-it or in your notebook as when we stop
Complete your summary of the story
Put all of the sections together into one summary paragraph.
Don't forget this story tonight!

Break up a story in chunks to remember
PLOT:
Record any reactions or connections you are having to your reading
Entering/Leaving
Turn
and Talk=
Pull-Up=
Group Teams=
Cold Calling=
Stations=
Literature Circle=
Great Job/Off Task
Classroom Jobs
Absences
Raise Your Hand
Bathroom
Getting Up
5 Minute Drills=
INSTRUCTION
PROCEDURES
Ms. SNOWDON & Mr. RUSSO
HUMANITIES Grade 8
Have your Student Notebook and your agenda books
Get your FOLDER
Librarian gets Team Books
Everyone Begins Warm-Up
Finish Warm-up and begin Independent Reading
Entering
Leaving
Clean up your area (garbage, belongings)
Put all work in your FOLDERS
We will line you up once you are ready
Turn your Folder as you come up to line
We will escort you to the next class
Raise your Hand!
To ask a question ...
To answer a question ...
To make a comment ...
When you need help ...
+
A+
SUCCESS
LEARNING
ideas
100%
Great Job!
Off Task
When you are absent . . .
G
E
T
Up!
CLASS JOBS:
L
E
T
'S
Practice!
HW=
Quick Write=
You want to be HERE
Come in and get working
Work with your best effort
You want to be HERE
DON'T
Not taking learning seriously
talking
not working up to potential
•Falcon Bucks
•Positive Phone Call
•Note to Parent
•Prize Box
•Homework Pass
•Verbal Reminder
•Student Conference
•Parent Contact
•Guidance Notification
•Behavior Plan
GREAT JOB
OFF TASK
Everyone say the SMARTEST thing you can think of . . .
We will determine who says something in the smartest way.
Don't Do it
When the one of the teachers is instructing the class

During SSR

In the middle of a worktime or a station.
IT's OK
When it is for class

During transitions between stations

When you're working in groups

When you're feeling tired.
Class Time is IMPORTANT
School policy is two bathroom passes per clas, per quarter

No passes the first or last 15 minutes of the mod

We will be keeping track.
When You need to go
Raise your hand like this
Wait for one of us to come over
SSR=
Explicit Instruction = I do, We do, You do
When we are learning something new, or have to show you how to do something, everyone will come up to the front of the classroom
Why?
It is easier to stay focused.

We will be practicing together and talking with different people.

It gives us a chance to move around
This is Important!
Station Expectations:
We will be writing all year.
Sometimes we will work to write formal essays, and other times we will have a shorter "Quick Write" questions That will require three things:
Text Evidence
An opinion about the answer

An argument to support your opinion
and why your text evidence is relevant
We cover elements of grammar we will to make us all better writers
Sometimes Groups will be assigned
There will be group roles each time
Sometimes groups
will be moving between stations
You are your group
We need your attention -
You need to:
One Hand Up
Stop Talking
Raise your hand
Focus your attention on us
L
E
T
'S
Practice!
Everyone talk to the person to their right . . .
When the signal goes up, follow the appropriate steps for refocusing.
Find your work in your folder
(There will be work in there)
Speak to one of us on the way in
Complete the daily warm-up
Ask someone at your table for notes from the days missed
Copy notes into your notebook/binder
If there is still time, begin reading, or conference with a teacher
This is important
You can do it!
We won't give up on you
After you finish your warm up, begin reading
Read quietly until the timer goes off
We will play light instrumental music in the background
Jot down inner conversation on your reading log
You may only abondon a book once per quarter
Choose a book that's "Just Right"
Silent Sustained Reading/Self Selected Reaidng
Warm Up=
Once you take you seat
A Warm Up is on the board - Complete it in your notebook
“I already explained it to you twice!” she cried out in exasperation.

What do you think exasperation means? Explain or highlight key words.
Vocabulary, Grammar, or Open Response
Turn and Talk is a great way to share what we're thinking . . .
We will give you a topic or question to talk about

Your will to someone next to you

Then about the topic or questions

Then they will respond with their thoughts
TURN
TALK
Active Listening
Accountable Talk
We will have written homework 2 times per week
Tuesday and Thursdays
Every Night . . .
This is due the NEXT DAY
HW
Assigned
Placed in
FOLDER
(completed)
D
O

Y
O
U
R

B
E
S
T
D
O

Y
O
U
R

B
E
S
T
DO YOUR BEST
Read for 30 Minutes
Read what you like to read
Fill out the Home Reading Log
Get it signed by your parents every week
Grading=
Librarian: hands out & collects SSR books

Timekeeper: makes sure group can finish in time

Note-taker: takes great class notes for absent students

Materials Manager: in charge of supplies & group cleanliness

Group Leader: keeps everyone on task and involved
We Need YOU
Listening
Processing
Responding
On Topic
Everyone Contributes
+
Fill in an application!
Practice =
How did you feel about the First day of School?
Facilitator Writer Timekeeper Presenters(2) Illustrator
Hold each other
ACCOUNTABLE
sometimes not
use you rubric
Mr. Russo
Writer
5 (awesome)
5 (this guy is great!)
(sometimes)
Fill in each column for every member of your group
I think that it is very important for the teacher to have rules, since we have rules as students. Teachers should be prepared and ready for class. I don't like a teacher that yells or makes fun of me either. I think it is important for a teacher to be fair above all, adn to be helpful when I have a problem or don't understand something Teachers should be responsible to show their Falcon PRIDE.
Example:
Only when you are told to move, Stay at your station, or Raise your hand, Move between stations QUIETLY
Movement:
On Task:
Focus on the work (independent or group), Good Effort
Monitor:
Your Own Behavior,
Get your work Done
Stations:
Vocabulary
Computers
READING
Research
Smart Board
Quick Write
Independent
Work Station
Turn & Talk
What do we gain from reading a lot?
What are some ways to decide if a book is a good fit for you?
Turn & Talk
Our Class Library
Treat the books with respect & care - they need to last
If returning books to a shelf, place back neatly
1)
2)
Books organized by reading level (Lexile)
Your selected book will go in group's ziploc bag

Focus on
MAKING
CONNECTIONS
Text
Self
World
Text
Scholars will be able to analyze the events the plot.
"You do"
Big Idea:
How does the action or problems move the story along?
Scholars will be able analyze a character’s actions, words, and descriptions, to determine personality traits
Big Idea:
What clues do author’s give to help us understand characters in a story?
p 178-180
Lines 1-36
p. 181
Lines 85 – 109
p. 185
Lines 214 – 235
Take out paper and make this chart
T. E.
What that says about the character
Exit Ticket:
How do Greg’s feelings towards Lemon Brown change by the end of the story? Use specific details from the text to support your answer.
Scholars will be able to analyze point of view in a narrative.
Big Idea: Who is telling the story, and why does it matter?
1 Person Get SSR Books
Begin Reading Silently
Text
Self
World
Text
Work on
MAKING CONNECTIONS
3rd person limited
1st person
3rd person omniscient
Before
Reading:
Scholars will be able analyze the point of view in a narrative
Big Idea:
How would the story be different if someone else told it?
Record your thoughts and your reactions
Quick write:
How is the story different
from the wolf's point of
view? Use text evidence
and the guiding questions
to support your answer.
HW:
Fact = a piece of information that is unarguably true.
Lincoln was a good president = opinion / arguable
Lincoln was the 16th president of the U.S. = FACT
Should Wildlife Stay Wild?
1 Person Get SSR Books - begin reading silently!
Reading Focus: QUESTIONS

Try to come up with a question while reading - maybe about what will happen, your character's action, etc.
We will analyze information from the text in order to determine what the author thinks is important and compare that to our own opinions.
Big Idea: How does the author feel about zoos?
Close your eyes and picture a tiger.
Turn & Talk
Did you picture a wild tiger, or one in captivity?
Do you think its a good thing to have animals in captivity (zoos, circuses, etc)? Why or why not?
The Author Thinks
I Think
We Do 1
Page 991, Lines 17-35
Listen to teacher read, fill in your chart
What does the author think?
What do YOU think? Do you agree / disagree / somewhat agree with the author? Explain.
We Do 2
Page 991& 992, Lines 36-67
Work with a partner
What does the author think?
What do YOU think? Do you agree / disagree / somewhat agree with the author? Explain.
You Do
Page 992-3, Lines 95 - end
Work on your own
What does the author think?
What do YOU think? Do you agree / disagree / somewhat agree with the author? Explain.
Quick Write:


What does the author think of zoos? Do you agree or disagree with the author? Use evidence from the text to support your response.
THICK
Important
vs.
Interesting
I Do:
Lines 1-16

As we read, we will be looking for information that the
Author Thinks is Important
The Author Thinks
I Think
On a piece of Paper
Make this Chart
HW:
Record your inner conversation while reading for 30 minutes (a book, magazine, news article, etc.) Record questions, reactions, and facts/information you've learned.
Technique
Language / Sentence Starters
Questioning
"I wonder..." "Who...?" "What...?" "Why...?"
Reacting
"I agree that..." "I like..."
"I disagree about..."
"That's interesting..."
Making Connections
"This reminds me of..."
"That's a lot like..."
"I learned..."
Monitoring Inner Conversation
Other Reading Strategies
using text clues to figure out what the author means when he or she does not say it directly
Infer -
Text Clues + Background Knowledge =
INFERENCE
briefly re-stating the most important ideas in your own words
Summarize -


Ms. Snowdon was born in Rota, Spain, on a military base because her dad was a Captain in the Navy. Military families move around a lot because they get assigned to jobs in different places around the world. She moved back and forth from Spain and Colorado three times before moving to Maryland when she was in middle school.
See if you can SUMMARIZE this in just one short sentence.
Let's practice SUMMARIZING
REACT to what you read:

"I can't believe..."

"Reading about _____ made me feel ______"
Scholars will be able
analyze
how the
setting
of a story contributes to its
mood
Big Idea: How does the author use the setting to create a feeling for readers?
Share Outs
Code your BCR with 1-2-3
Record something new that you learned:

about your characters
or

a new fact or piece of information.
Scholars will be able to identify and analyze theme in a narrative text
Big Idea:
What can we learn from text that we can apply to the world around us?
Putting the text in our own words;

Making a long story short
Summarizing
(On Your Own)
Work on your own to complete your individual stories

If you finish, ask for another story or write down the theme of your narrative
Closing
Quick Write - What is the GIST of the story?
(use your chart to bring it together)
Reader's
Response:

SUMMARIZE
Big Idea: How can we determine the theme of a story?
Scholars will be able to
identify
and
analyze

theme
in a narrative text
We Do - Partners
(BACK of the handout)
Describe an important theme in "The Treasure of Lemon Brown." Use details from the story to support your answer.
BCR
Share Out
What is the theme (lesson) from "The Treasure of Lemon Brown?"
Narrative
Texts

THINK about a time when you wanted something so badly, you’d do anything to achieve it.

When you felt this, you felt
MOTIVATION
. Motivation is the drive that causes people to strive
toward a goal.

WRITE down a list of things you have been willing to work for.

*
Bring up your
TWS
,
Notes
, and
Lit Book
Think-Write-Share
Big idea:
How do we keep our focus to remember what we are reading?
Point to your partner
What do you put on your
Motivation List?
Raymond's Run
Vocab:
draw a T-chart
Word
My Guess
relay

prodigy

sidekick

liable

crouch

clutch
a team race where people take turns running
a person with an exceptional talent
a close friend
lijely tog
to stoop with bent knees
to grasp or hold tightly
Questions

Connections

Inferences
Keeping Track of a Story:
Work in Parts
and Summarize
as you go
pg 38: Follow Along
Notice how we record our thoughts to keep the story straight

The focus is
always
on the text
Questions
Connections
Inferences
Write your thoughts, page # and line #'s
"not quite right" - Raymond must have some sort of disability

Squeaky sticks up for him, so famiily is probably important to her

Lines-8-16

Pg 38
Example:
The story, "Two Were Left," talks about Noni, and eskimo boy stranded on an iceberg with his dog Nimuk. Noni is food, and they are out of food and water. In order to survive, Noni thinks he is going to have to kill and eat his dog. Although he does not like the idea, he believes that it is a sign of his manhood to do what it is necessary. As he is about to commit the act, he looks into Nimuk's eyes, and cannot go through with it. He gives up, convinced that Nimuk will instead eat him. He passes out, and the dog takes care of him. In the end a helicopter flies over and sees both of them together. Although it does not say so, the reader is lead to believe that they are rescued by the helicopter pilot.
Keep your notes in order!
Let's Focus on
PLOT
1. Exposition
2. Rising Action
3. Climax
4. Falling Action
5. Resolution
Plot Diagram or Story Map
the series of events that make up a story
Background, Setting and Character Introduction to the conlflict
(main problem)
Characters react to a problem (conflict) in the story
The problem reaches a critical point. The tension that has been building reaches a peak.
Tension decreases as the conflict is settled.
The outcome of the problem and the story.
PLOT
The action or sequence of events in a story
Working through the PLOT
Plot ?'s:
BCR:
Explain how the climax of the story leads to the resolution. Use details from the text to support your response.

SR:
Which of these details in the story is part of the _____? (exposition, climax, or resolution, rising action)

SR:
Which event has the greatest impact on the outcome of the story?
For each section work with a partener
to determine the elements of the Plot
Guiding Questions:
Exposition:
What background information do we get about Squeaky?

What is the setting?

What is the main problem she faces?
Rising Action:
What motivates Squeaky, or makes her act the way she does?

How do her responsibilities to Raymond cause her to act?

Why does she act so harshly to the other girls?
Climax:
What happens at the race?
Falling Action:
How does Squeaky feel differently after the race?

What happened that cause her change of heart?
Resolution:
What decisions does Squeaky make about Raymond? about Gretchen?

What do you think will happen next?
1.
What part of the plot’s rising action increases tension between Squeaky and Gretchen?

A. the May Pole dance
B. the argument on the street
C. Raymond’s running in the race
D. Squeaky’s running against her father
2.
Which event has the greatest impact on the outcome of the story?

A. Squeaky seeing Raymond running.
B. The argument on the street.
C. Squeaky’s running against her father.
D. Squeaky winning the May Day race.
BCR: Explain how the climax of the story leads to the resolution. Use details from the text to support your response.
Take out a Half Sheet of Paper
Answer the final question at the bottom of your Plot Chart:
Which event
has the greatest
impact on the
outcome of the
story?
Title the Page:
"Raymond's Run" Notes
Somebody
Wanted
But
So
Squeaky -
-Looks after Raymond
-Loves to Run (the best)

Raymond has a disability
She wants
to win the
May-pole
Race
(50 yard dash)
Gretchen is a new girly that is also fast

and

She has to take care of Raymond
She runs the race and wins,
wants to coach Raymond,
and respects Gretchen for caring about running tlike she does.
Think - Write -Share
What part of the plot seems like it is the most important to a story? Why do you think so?
- Exposition - Rising Action -
- Climax - Falling Action - Resolution -
Somebody
Wanted
But
So
Warm Up:
Fill out the Chart for Raymond's Run:
PLOT
&
CONFLICT
CONFLICT = problem
CONFLICT is part of the Rising Action
CONFLICT motivates the characters to act a certain way
CONFLICT
Intro to Narrative
Objective:
Reader's
Response:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Share Out:
Closing:
DAY 1
Make a prediction
(what do you think will happen next?)
Scholars will be able to preview the narrative unit and begin writing their own story
Big Question: What is a narrative?
11/29 Notes: Narrative
I do:
We do:
The article The Spider-Man behind Spider-Man, tells the story of Steven Kutcher. He is a man who studies bugs for a living and works with bugs on all different types of movies, including the spiders for the movie Spider-Man.
The article The Spider-Man behind Spider-Man, tells the story of Steven Kutcher. He is a man who studies bugs for a living and works with bugs on all different types of movies, including the spiders for the movie Spider-Man.
The article The Spider-Man behind Spider-Man, tells the story of Steven Kutcher. He is a man who studies bugs for a living and works with bugs on all different types of movies, including the spiders for the movie Spider-Man. The title directly relates to Kutcher’s story and helps the reader think about the different people that work behind the scenes to make different movies successful.
Even more than that, the article helps us see that there are all sorts unique jobs in the world. Most people would never think that an entomologist could ever have such a cool job working in the movies.
The title directly relates to Kutcher’s story and helps the reader think about the different people that work behind the scenes to make different movies successful.
I want to openly address the question:
I want to talk about the title:
I want to add a "THICK" response:
1.
2.
3.
The article The Spider-Man behind Spider-Man, tells the story of Steven Kutcher. He is a man who studies bugs for a living and works with bugs on all different types of movies, including the spiders for the movie Spider-Man. The title directly relates to Kutcher’s story and helps the reader think about the different people that work behind the scenes to make different movies successful. Even more than that, the article helps us see that there are all sorts unique jobs in the world. Most people would never think that an entomologist could ever have such a cool job working in the movies.
I want to CHECK my answer:
4.
Team Challenge:
BEST RESPONSE CONTEST
Explain how the title, Zoos: Myth and Reality, helps the reader understand the most important idea in this article. In your response use information from the article that supports your answer.
Think-Write-Share: (10 minutes)
Everyone take ten minutes to write a response to this question.
(Hint: Use your Author Thinks/I Think charts from last week to help).
THEN
Create a Poster:
Share your responses with your group in order to come up with the best answer.

Mix and match answers and sentences to make the best response.

Write the question

Show how to “Break it Down” by coding the question

Write out your group response
Present your Response to the class:
How did you Break Down the Question?

How did you Answer?

Why is Your answer the BEST?
Vote on the Best Response
You Just Answered
a
BCR!
XTRA Credit:
Take down the Steps to Answering a BCR question

Create a Rap or a Song or a Picture that will help us remember how to follow the steps to answering a great BCR.
Summary Recap
+'s
-Most people had basic details about Squeaky
-Her attitude towards Raymond
-Understood the race
-Understood her character
-'s
Important details were missed:
-about Raymond's particpation in the race
-about Raymond's influence on Squeaky
-about Her chnge in attitude at the end of the race
-about Her problem with Gretchen

Narrative Stories:
tell something interesting about one of the characters

Informational:
Summarize some new information
Think - Write - Share
Describe a time when a friend did something that surprised you. How did it make you feel? How did your opinion about your friend change?
Characterization:
Objective:
Reader's
Response:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Closing:
Scholars will be able to apply reading strategies in order to summarize and synthesize "The Treasure of Lemon Brown"
Big Idea:
What clues do author’s give to help us understand characters in a story?
Tomorrow:
Talking about
PLOT

and

CHARACTERS

Inner Conversation:
Focus on ?'s you have about what you are reading
Inner Conversation =
Questions, Connections, and Inferences
Record your thoughts on a post-it or in your notebook as when we stop
Connections
Inferences
Write your thoughts, page # and line #'s
"not quite right" - Raymond must have some sort of disability

Squeaky sticks up for him, so famiily is probably important to her

Lines-8-16

Pg 38
Keep your notes in order!
Title the Page:
"The Treasure of Lemon Brown" Notes
Questions
PAGE 178
Vocab in context:
The silence was
ominous
and scary
He would
commence
his trip when the rain stopped.
The hallway was dark, so he moved
tentatively
.
adj. - threatening
v. - to begin
adv. - uncertainly or hesistantly
Independent Work:
Complete your summary of the story
1. A topic sentence introducing the story.

2. A description of the main characters.

3. A description of the main conflict.

4. A description of the outcome of the story.

5. Proper grammar and spelling
Narrative texts tell a story to:
make a point
express an opinion
OR
provide an enjoyable experience
A successful
summary includes . . .
CHARACTERS
a character is a person, animal, or imaginary creature in a narrative
are most involved in the conflict and are central to the story action.
MAJOR CHARACTERS
MINOR CHARACTERS
become known through their interaction with major characters.
Dynamic
= Character changes
- character shows growth
- usually related to the conflict
STATIC CHARACTERS
DYNAMIC CHARACTERS
Static
= Character stays the same
-The author expects you to notice the change
-Ask yourself what the author is suggesting by those changes
-Understanding character development helps us understand the theme
CHARACTERIZATION
An author develops a character's personality with

-descriptons about the character
-what the character thinks, says or does
Characters may reveal their attitudes and innermost thoughts through their speech and their behavior.
As usual, we'll have to look for clues in the text

-What passages describe the character?
(and Who is describing the character?)

-What behaviors and actions do the characters have?

-How does the character react to other characters?

-Was the character changed by the events of the story?
Let's Look At
our Characters
Lemon Brown and Greg
Actions
Conversations
Descriptions
Find an example from the book for each category
Greg Helps Lemon Brown scare away the thugs. Why?
Do people get closer when they face difficult times together?
Lemon Brown Tells Greg about his son
What does that tell us about Lemon Brown?
How is Lemon Brown Described?
Does the name Lemon Brown have any meaning?
Greg's interactions with Lemon Brown show him to be ________.
a. spoiled
b. judgmental
c. compassionate
d. mean
Lemon Brown can best be described as ______.
a. dirty
b. sentimental
c. worthless
d. a know it all
Quick Quiz
Greg's interactions with Lemon Brown show him to be ________.
a. spoiled
b. judgmental
c. compassionate
d. mean
Lemon Brown can best be described as ______.
a. dirty
b. sentimental
c. worthless
d. a know it all
Re-Quiz
Character Actions
Thoughts/Dialogue
Descriptions
As you read through
each section look for
Text Evidence:
SHARE you story about your friend . . .
POINT
to
your

PARTNER
What words would you use to describe PERRY?
Sneaky
cool
quiet
smooth
DARING
brave
honorable
Intelligent
liar
TNT
p. 186
Lines 252 – 271
Point to your partner
How would you describe the fight? How might the person who was fighting describe it differently?
Think - Write - Share
Think about a time you saw a fight.
How might the person IN the fight describe it differently than you would?
Narrator is involved in the story - uses "I"
Narrator is an outside observer that follows the thoughts & feelings of just ONE character
Narrator is an outside observer that sees all characters' thoughts and feelings
Point of View
The perspective from which a story is told:

Who is telling the story?
Who is the narrator?
Through whose eyes are we looking?
Description
What the character Says, does, or thinks
I walked to school with my friend Cheryl. I was feeling down about my bad grades, and Cheryl asked what was wrong.
Diamond and Cheryl walked to school together. Diamond was distracted, lost in her thoughts about bad grades until Cheryl asked, "What's wrong?"
Diamond and Cheryl walked to school together. Diamond was distracted, lost in her thoughts about bad grades, and Cheryl was wondering why her friend was so quiet, so she asked her what was wrong.
Characters - Conflict - Plot
Objective:
Reader's Response:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Closing:
DAY 1
Scholars will be able to analyze the actions of the characters in order to explain how they advance the plot.
Big Idea: Character actions move a story along
Questioning
Who...?
What...?
Where...?
Why...?
When...?
How...?
Answer the SR and the Quick Write on the back of the handout
What are Russell's actions that result in him getting trapped again and again?
How would this story be different if the old man wasn't there with him?
Advances the plot =
moves the story along
Raymond runs alongside Squeaky during the race
Squeaky realizes how fast he is and decides to coach him
as a result...
Look for the action, then figure out how it advances the plot (what happens
as a result
that
moves the story along
)
p. 180
Lines
33-36
p. 184
Lines
189-195
Partners
p. 184
Lines 196-200
p. 185
Lines 230-239
Independent
p. 184
Lines 242-251
p. 185
Lines 267-293
Turn & Talk
about your day so far using the third person perspective
Bring:
Think-Write-Share
Textbook
Paper for notes
Point of
View
How do you know?
(text evidence)
Why is it important that it’s told in this point of view?
Open book to "Raymond's Run" p. 38
Re-read the first paragraph
Use the chart to determine the point of view

1. You can tell Raymond’s Run is told from the first person point of view because the narrator:

A) is a minor character in the story who reveals
some information
B) is an outside observer, not a character in the story
C) reveals Raymond’s and Gretchen’s thoughts
D) uses the pronouns I and we to refer to
herself



2. Because of the first person narration the reader is mostly aware of

A) Squeaky's thoughts and feelings
B) All the characters' thoughts and feelings
C) Raymond's mental disability
D) Gretchen's life story



3. You can tell Lemon Brown is told from third person limited point of view because the narrator —

A) is a main character in the story
B) tells about the thoughts and feelings of all of the
characters
C) is outside the story and tells what one character
sees, thinks, and feels
D) describes his or her own thoughts
If Lemon Brown was the narrator
3rd person limited -
Greg
-Write the three little pigs story from the point of view of one of the pigs.

or

-Re-write another children's story from the P.O.V. of the bad guy
Sad that his girlfriend had left him, Ben wasn’t paying attention as he walked down the street. His sister Jessica felt sorry for him and didn't know how to cheer him up.
1st person
3rd Limited
3rd Omniscient
Sad that his girlfriend had left him, Ben wasn’t paying attention as he walked down the street. His sister Jessica asked how she could help him cheer up.
1st person
3rd Limited
3rd Omniscient
It was times like these when I thought my father, who hated guns and had never been to any wars, was the bravest man who ever lived.
1st person
3rd Limited
3rd Omniscient
Okay, we were mutant freaks, we were on the lam, but we were FLYING. Something people can only dream about.
1st person
3rd Limited
3rd Omniscient
Don't go into the park after sunset. The warning rolled around Gaia Moore's head as she crossed the street to Washington Square park. She savored the words as she would a forkful of chocolate cheesecake.
1st person
3rd Limited
3rd Omniscient
He covered his chest with his bag so that they couldn't hear his heart whacking wildly against his ribs. He felt sick, his stomach twisting into knots.
1st person
3rd Limited
3rd Omniscient
Work in partners / groups to fill in the venn diagram for both versions of "Three Little Pigs" story
"The Tell-Tale Heart"
Objective:
Reader's
Response:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Closing:
Scholars will be able to
summarize
and
synthesize
events
in

"The Tell-Tale Heart,"
by
Edgar Allen Poe.
Big Idea:
How does the setting and the mood influence my understanding of a story?
Tomorrow:
Talking about

SETTING

and

MOOD

Inner Conversation:
Focus on ?'s you have about what you are reading
Inner Conversation =
Questions, Connections, and Inferences
Record your thoughts on a post-it or in your notebook as when we stop
Connections
Inferences
Write your thoughts, page # and line #'s
"not quite right" - Raymond must have some sort of disability

Squeaky sticks up for him, so famiily is probably important to her

Lines-8-16

Pg 38
Keep your notes in order!
Title the Page:
"The Tell-Tale Heart" Notes
Questions
PAGE 82
Vocab in context:
His noisy neighbors often
vexed
him.
He
stifled
a yawn, so he did not seem bored.
The accused man
vehemently
denied that he was ever near the scene of the crime.
v. - irritated,
annoyed
v. - to supress, to curb, or withhold
adv. - with intense
emotion
Independent Work:
Complete your summary of the story
1. A topic sentence introducing the story.

2. A description of the main characters.

3. A description of the main conflict.

4. A description of the outcome of the story.

5. Proper grammar and spelling
A successful
summary includes . . .
synonyms
anger, irk, trouble
synonyms
prevent, check
synonyms
enthusiastically, fervently
Meet the Author
Edgar Allen Poe
P. 81
Bring your book
and
a sheet of paper for sticky notes
Pull-up
Pull Up with:

Your folder
Paper & pen or pencil
and Mood
Setting
Turn & Talk: how does this image make you feel?
WHERE & WHEN a story takes place
time of day
year
city / state / country
any location details (farm, city, house)
weather, scene setup
Mood is the feeling the author creates for readers.

word choice
character actions
setting

...all contribute to the MOOD of a story
It was a dark and stormy night. Tyreik was home alone, waiting for the telephone to ring. All he could hear was the sound of his heart pounding in his ears.
It was a beautiful sunny day. Tyreik had the house all to himself, and was excitedly waiting for his friend to call. He could hear birds chirping and kids laughing down the street.
vs.
Green Station
Pink Station
Blue Station
Yellow Station
@ Smartboard with teacher
Describe a story you imagine happening in each of these settings.
1)
2)
3)
T.E.
Mood
How does the setting
contribute to the mood?
Setting
p. 82 Line 18
"Every night, about midnight, I turned the latch of his door - oh so gently!"
Last paragraph
p. 83 Lines 26 - 34
"hinges creaked"
"thick darkness"
"he could not see"
Exit Slip:
1) Which of the following is NOT a setting detail from the story?

A) And every night, about midnight, I turned the latch of
his door
B) I opened his door... the shutters were close fastened.
C) The disease had sharpened my senses--not dulled them.
D) I was inside the room, and undid the lantern cautiously.
2. The feeling created by the quiet, midnight setting is:

A) Ominious and creepy
B) Exciting and joyful
C) Anxious and worrisome
D) Sad and depressing
3. On the last page, the author develops a feeling of anxiety by using the phrase:

A) "I swung the chair... but the noise arose over arose over all and continually increased. It grew louder--louder--louder!"
B) "The officers were satisfied. My manner had convinced them."
C) "But, ere long, I felt myself getting pale."
D) "I smiled - for what had I to fear? I bade the gentlemen welcome. The shriek, I said, was my own in a dream."
The June roses over the porch were awake bright and early on that morning, rejoicing with all their hearts in the cloudless sunshine, like friendly little neighbors, as they were. Quite flushed with excitement were their ruddy faces, as they swung in the wind, whispering to one another what they had seen, for some peeped in at the dining room windows where the feast was spread
-from "Little Women" by Louisa May Alcott
It seemed as if the war would never end. Day after day of too much hard work, not enough food and no chance to make or do anything beautiful. If a war lasts long enough, is it possible that people would completely forget the idea of beauty?
-from "When My Name Was Keoko" by
Linda Sue Park
The dull light blinked quickly above Garrett's head. Small-town rural life had taken its toll on him. He was sick of being around people who had no intention of finishing school or exploring the world.
In the April afternoon, Shayla watched as the blossoms from the orchard trees fell quietly on the still lake. The sun was lightly shaded by kind, fluffly clouds, and the air was crisp but not cold.
The inside of the building was dark except for the dim light that filtered through the dirty windows from the streetlamps. There was a room a few feet from the door, and from where he stood in the entrance, Greg could see a squarish patch of light on the floor. He entered the room, frowning at the musty smell. It was a large room that might have been someone’s parlor at one time. Squinting, Greg could see an old table on its side against one wall, what looked like a pile of rags or a torn mattress in the corner, and a couch, with one side broken, in front of the window...

For a moment Greg thought he heard something like a scraping against the wall. He listened carefully, but it was gone.
Lemon Brown
- Think - Write - Share -
THINK
about a time you learned an important life lesson.
WRITE
about the lesson. What happened?
What did you learn?
Who taught you the lesson?
How did learning the lesson change you as a person?
Pull-Up: Notes, Pen/Pencil
Share out your Lesson with a partner
Practice active Listening?

Can you explain what your
partner is saying?
THEME:
What do you remember about THEME from poetry?
NOTES:
12/19 -Theme:

-The moral or life lesson that the reader learns.

-The theme is the author’s thoughts about the topic.

-Theme is revealed through Plot and Characters
 Step 1: Consider the Title

 Step 2: Examine the Plot and Conflict

 Step 3: Analyze the Characters

 Step 4: Make Connections
Steps to Finding Theme
THEME
Plot
Characters
1. Exposition
2. Rising Action
3. Climax
4. Falling Action
5. Resolution
Background, Setting and Character Introduction to the conlflict
(main problem)
Characters react to a problem (conflict) in the story
The problem reaches a critical point. The tension that has been building reaches a peak.
Tension decreases as the conflict is settled.
The outcome of the problem and the story.
 Step 1: Consider the Title

 Step 2: Examine the Plot and Conflict

 Step 3: Analyze the Characters

 Step 4: Make Connections
Steps to Finding Theme
A boy who watched over a flock of sheep outside the village played a trick on the villagers one day, crying, “Wolf! Wolf!” when there really wasn’t one. When all the villagers came running, he laughed and laughed.

The next day he did it again: “Wolf! There really is a wolf this time!” Again they came; again he laughed at them. He did this two or three more times. Each time to the villagers went to help him, and he laughed and laughed.

One day, a wolf did show up. The boy shouted, “Wolf! Help! There really is a wolf!” but no one came. The wolf killed the boy and all the sheep.
"The Boy Who Cried Wolf"
 Step 1: Consider the Title

 Step 2: Examine the Plot and Conflict

 Step 3: Analyze the Characters

 Step 4: Make Connections
Steps to Finding Theme
A. No one believes a liar, even when he tells the truth.

B. Never try to trick a group of villages about dangerous wolves.

C. Playing tricks on people is very immature, and only young boys would do it.

D. Wolves wait until you’re least prepared for them.



Provide 2 details from the text to support your answer.

1.

2.
What is the Theme?
Complain about the liquor store but what you drinking liquor for?
Complain about the gloom but when’d you pick a broom up?
Just listening to Pac ain't gone make it stop
A rebel in your thoughts, ain't gon make it halt
If you don’t become an actor you’ll never be a factor
What is the THEME of this song? How do you know?
Think - Write - Share
Complain about the liquor store but what you drinking liquor for?
Complain about the gloom but when’d you pick a broom up?
Just listening to Pac ain't gone make it stop
A rebel in your thoughts, ain't gon make it halt
If you don’t become an actor you’ll never be a factor
What is the THEME of this song? How do you know?
SHARE
Theme in
 Step 1: Consider the
Title


Step 2: Examine
the Plot and Conflict


 Step 3: Analyze the
Characters


 Step 4: Make
Connections


Step 5: Determine
Theme
Describe an important theme "Raymond's Run." Use details from the story to support your answer.
Theme BCR
An important theme in "Raymond's Run" is that the end result is not as important as what you learn along the way. At the beginning of the story, competitive Squeaky wants to show that she's best runner in her neighborhood, especially to her nemisis Gretchen. But even when Squeaky wins the race at the end, she seems to care more about how well Gretchen and her brother Raymond both run. This change shows the reader that what was learned along the way mattered more than winning. This isn't just about running a race: the reader can apply this lesson to type of journey or event they might go through.
Use your notes and
p. 178
Fill in the steps chart on your handout
Determine the theme
Theme in "The Treasure of Lemon Brown"
Inner Voice & Plot
Objective:
Reader's
Response:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 3
Scholars will be able to apply reading strategies in order to analyze the plot of "No Guitar Blues."
Inner
Conversation =
Thoughts in
your head
Make connections to what your reading -

"This reminds me of..."
Big idea:
What was the sequence of events in the story?
Point to your partner
With your partner, see what you remember about the following narrative terms:
No Guitar Blues
Questions

Connections

Inferences
Keeping Track of a Story:
Get ready to TURN N' TALK...
plot
characterization
theme
genre
point of view
conflict
by Gary Soto
Vocab in context:
You need to scrub that
grimy
shower.
He had a bad reputation as being a
deceitful
car salesman.
She was always a nervous person and lived in a
perpetual
state of fear.
adj. - covered with dirt
adj. - never ending or occuring repeatedly
synonyms
dirty, grubby, filthy
synonyms
everlasting, constant
adj. - lying to or misleading others
synonyms
dishonest, untruthful
p. 27
Plot Mapping "No Guitar Blues"
Characterization & Review
Objective:
SSR /
Reader's Response:
Lesson:
Work Period:
SRs:
Closing:
DAY 2
Scholars will be able to analyze characterization and other narrative elements in a short story.
Big Idea:
What inferences can I make about a character in a narrative?

REACT

"I can't believe..."
"This makes me
feel..."
Think - Write - Share
How do you think other people would describe your personality? What are some things that you say or do that make them think that about you?
Characterization
By the end of the story, Fausto's words and actions show him to be:
1 - spoiled
2 - untrustworthy
3 - peaceful
4 - honorable
Fausto probably gives the reward money to his church because:
1 - knows how hard it is to be poor
2 - he feels guilty for being deceitful
3 - he didn't want a guitar anymore
Re-Quiz
How do you think other people would describe your personality? What are some things you say or do that make them describe you that way?
POINT
to
your

PARTNER
Fausto
can be described as ____________
SAYS
THINKS
DOES
"That afternoon Fausto knew his mission in life: to play guitar..."

"What the heck, he'd give it a try."
"I want a guitar for Christmas"
Tried to mow lawns, rode a broken bike to try and find a job
Fausto
can be described as ____________
SAYS
THINKS
DOES
Fausto
can be described as __honest__
SAYS
THINKS
DOES
We Do p. 30
You Do p. 33 - 35
"This dog looked like he beloned to rich people... it just might work."
PULL - UP
You Need:
A BRIDGES Book
(green)

Paper

a Pen or Pencil
On one side of you Index Card:

Write your name
Title it "PRE"
Number 1-5
Fausto’s main conflict is that:

A. He wanted a guitar his family didn’t have the money.
B. He found a lost dog, and wanted to keep it.
C. He felt bad about lying to get a reward for returning the dog.
D. He ripped his “good pants” playing football.

What is the climax of the story?

A. Fausto returns the dog to the family and gets food and a reward.
B. Fausto decides to donate the twenty dollars to the church.
C. Fausto decides to lie about the dog.
D. Fausto’s grandfather gives him a guitarron.
The rising action of the story begins when:

A. Fausto leaves the house to earn money by raking leaves
B. Fausto finds the lost dog.
C. Fausto decides he wants to be on “American Bandstand.”
D. Fausto’s mom makes him breakfast.

Which conflict causes Fausto to lie about where he finds the dog?

A. Nobody was hiring Fausto to rake leaves.
B. Fausto knows his family does not have the money to but him a guitar.
C. Fausto wants to trick people with more money than him.
D. Fausto needed the money to buy new “good pants”
In the falling action of the story:

A. Fausto gets a new guitarron from his Grandfather.
B. Fausto gets a reward from the dog’s owners.
C. Faust gets up early to go to church.
D. Fausto plays soccer and feels better about donating the money.
On the back side of your Index Card:

Write your name
Title it "POST"
Number 1-5
Fausto’s main conflict is that:

A. He wanted a guitar his family didn’t have the money.
B. He found a lost dog, and wanted to keep it.
C. He felt bad about lying to get a reward for returning the dog.
D. He ripped his “good pants” playing football.

What is the climax of the story?

A. Fausto returns the dog to the family and gets food and a reward.
B. Fausto decides to donate the twenty dollars to the church.
C. Fausto decides to lie about the dog.
D. Fausto’s grandfather gives him a guitarron.
The rising action of the story begins when:

A. Fausto leaves the house to earn money by raking leaves
B. Fausto finds the lost dog.
C. Fausto decides he wants to be on “American Bandstand.”
D. Fausto’s mom makes him breakfast.

Which conflict causes Fausto to lie about where he finds the dog?

A. Nobody was hiring Fausto to rake leaves.
B. Fausto knows his family does not have the money to but him a guitar.
C. Fausto wants to trick people with more money than him.
D. Fausto needed the money to buy new “good pants”
In the falling action of the story:

A. Fausto gets a new guitarron from his Grandfather.
B. Fausto gets a reward from the dog’s owners.
C. Faust gets up early to go to church.
D. Fausto plays soccer and feels better about donating the money.
REVIEW:
Fausto’s main conflict is that:

A. He wanted a guitar his family didn’t have the money.
B. He found a lost dog, and wanted to keep it.
C. He felt bad about lying to get a reward for returning the dog.
D. He ripped his “good pants” playing football.

What is the climax of the story?

A. Fausto returns the dog to the family and gets food and a reward.
B. Fausto decides to donate the twenty dollars to the church.
C. Fausto decides to lie about the dog.
D. Fausto’s grandfather gives him a guitarron.
The rising action of the story begins when:

A. Fausto leaves the house to earn money by raking leaves
B. Fausto finds the lost dog.
C. Fausto decides he wants to be on “American Bandstand.”
D. Fausto’s mom makes him breakfast.

Which conflict causes Fausto to lie about where he finds the dog?

A. Nobody was hiring Fausto to rake leaves.
B. Fausto knows his family does not have the money to but him a guitar.
C. Fausto wants to trick people with more money than him.
D. Fausto needed the money to buy new “good pants”
In the falling action of the story:

A. Fausto gets a new guitarron from his Grandfather.
B. Fausto gets a reward from the dog’s owners.
C. Faust gets up early to go to church.
D. Fausto plays soccer and feels better about donating the money.
Scoring:
4-5 right = Advanced
3 right = Proficient
2 or less = Basic
Raise Your Hand . . .
If you improved from "PRE" to "POST."
tomorrow
Characterization
Theme
Review
1. List three details learned in the
EXPOSITION
of the story.

Bonus:
What is the line where the exposition ends and the rising action begins? Defend your choice.




2. List three key events in the
RISING ACTION
of the story.

Bonus:
Who is Fausto’s main conflict with? What type of conflict is it?



3. List the
CLIMAX
of the story.




4. List 2 events from the
FALLING ACTION

of the story.



5. List the
RESOLUTION
of the story.


Bonus:
What does the resolution say about
the theme of the story?
Title your paper
"No Guitar Blues"
Let's Focus on
PLOT
1. Exposition
2. Rising Action
3. Climax
4. Falling Action
5. Resolution
Plot Diagram or Story Map
the series of events that make up a story
Background, Setting and Character Introduction to the conlflict
(main problem)
Characters react to a problem (conflict) in the story
The problem reaches a critical point. The tension that has been building reaches a peak.
Tension decreases as the conflict is settled.
The outcome of the problem and the story.
He sees Los Lobos on "American Bandstand"

Fausto wants to play guitar

Fuasto's family is poor

Fuasto has a Latino heritage

The story takes place in the 1980's
Exposition
Fuasto goes out to make his own money

Fausto can't get any work

He finds a lost dog of people with money
Rising Action
Fausto returns the dog, but lies about how he found it.

The owners feed him and give him $20

Fausto feels bad about lying to get the money
Rising Action
Fuasto goes to church

Fuasto decides to donate the $20 to the church
Climax
Fuasto feels better

He plays a good game of soccer

He rips his good pants, and wishes for the $20.
Falling Action
Fuasto gets a guitar from his grandfather.

Fuasto begins to learn how to play guitar
Resolution
Use p. 28
Use p. 29 - 34
Use p. 35 - 36
Use p. 36
Use p. 36 - 37
Full transcript