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Dystopian Society

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Amber Meares

on 23 March 2014

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Transcript of Dystopian Society

Dystopian Society
design by Dóri Sirály for Prezi
5 Elements of Dystopian Society
Government controlled society
Information and independent thought restricted
Citizens fear outside world
Citizens conform and shun individuality
Propaganda manages society
Government Controlled Society
The US government represents the dystopian trait of the government controlling society through the use of surveillance systems. Everywhere you look, whether it be in schools, businesses, or even street corners, Big Brother is watching through the lenses of security cameras. People have the right to privacy however the government controls people and uses surveillance systems to keep a watchful eye on the people of the US. The government's ability to constantly watch citizens gives them the ability to have more control over society.
Information and Independent Thought Restricted
One way the US government represents the dystopian trait of restricting information and independent thought is through limiting the websites students in the school syste have access to. The blocking of certain sites takes awaym students' right to freedom and learning abilities. This is just one example of many where the government has taken control and restricted the rights of citizens by denying access to certain thoughts and opportunities for education.
After the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 Americans' views of people of middle eastern decent have been different. Ever since the terrorist attack, the media has portrayed the Middle Eastern as being entirely terrorist and altered the views of citizens in the US. most citizens fear people from the Middle East and even fear people of Middle Eastern decent even if they are citizens of the US and have lived in America all their life. The effects of 9/11 include a fear of the outside world and a fear of adventuring out and exploring the rest of the world. The US is becoming a dystopia due to the fear of the outside world within our people.
Propaganda Manages Society
In the past the government of the US has used propaganda to encourage the citizens to follow the path the government had in its sights such as ads to encourage men to enlist in the army. Politicians currently use similar tactics to market themselves to voters and influence their votes which affects politics and the government of the US. The way the government and the country is run is dependent on propaganda and media, representing a dystopian trait.
Citizens Fear Outside World
Citizens Conform and Shun Individuality
An example of the American Government displaying the dystopian characteristic of citizens conforming and shunning individuality is the use of uniforms in the school system. Students do not have the ability to show character or uniqueness due to the lack of individuality in their clothing. Another example of American citizens representing a dystopia through shunning individuality is the Westboro Baptist Church. The Westboro Baptist Church is known for its hateful protests and its shunning of individuality among other people and is a prime example of citizens in the US showing this dystopian trait.
By Addie Franklin & Cade Knebel
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