Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

One Flesh

No description
by

Camila A

on 27 March 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of One Flesh

Separation in elderly marriage
How old age weakens human emotion
Time gently wears away human lives and leads to death.
The slow decline of a family unit due to time
Final Stanza
One Flesh
First Stanza
In the first stanza, Elizabeth Jennings explores the physical separation of her parents in two single beds. The father intends to read, but doesn’t concentrate. He keeps the light on, as if busy. The mother dreams of childhood and contemplates on men in general. He in the light and she in the dark make huge contrast, this maybe explaining how distant they grew from each other. The poet, imagines that they are expectant: awaiting some event or excitement to stir their lives into action. Both are just staring emptily: he at the book, she at the shadows. They seem physically, mentally and emotionally worlds apart.
Second Stanza
The Voice
In this stanza, it is a surprise for their daughter, Elizabeth Jennings, to see them apart. She sees a contrast between the distant companionship and the passionate lives they once lived,as they shared memories, experience, relationship and mutual isolation. Their silence unites them,as they have their isolation in common. Elizabeth Jennings seems to think they are not aware of the fire they have lost as their lives have cooled into side-by-side isolation.
Elizabeth Jennings
Lying apart now, each in a separate bed,
He with a book, keeping the light on late,
She like a girl dreaming of childhood,
All men elsewhere - it is as if they wait
Some new event: the book he holds unread,
Her eyes fixed on the shadows overhead.

Tossed up like flotsam from a former passion,
How cool they lie. They hardly ever touch,
Or if they do it is like a confession
Of having little feeling - or too much.
Chastity faces them, a destination
For which their whole lives were a preparation.

Strangely apart, yet strangely close together,
Silence between them like a thread to hold
And not wind in. And time it self's a feather
Touching them gently. Do they know they're old,
These two who are my father and my mother
Whose fire from which I came, has now grown cold?

We think that the voice in this poem is the daughter of a marriage.
In this poem the voice could be the author, Elizabeth Jennings as her relationship and dealing with her parents is something personal.

Delfina Collazo, Camila Alegri, Francisco Cagnoli and Juan Cruz Passanante.
Mood
The mood is one of regret as they look back to better times, times when they were happy and together as one same person. Now they are distant, apart. There is a sad, empty atmosphere. The is an air of restraint and formality.
Point of view:
First person - the pronouns "my" and "I".

"These two who are my father and my mother
Whose fire from which I came, has now grown cold".
Tone
At first the author writes in despair as she describes her parents relationship now, broken, separate and lost. But she finally finds peace in the final stanza. She speaks with kindness and tenderness of her parents who once loved each other dearly and their daughter.
Language
Themes
Lying apart now, each in a separate bed,
He with a book, keeping the light on late,
She like a girl dreaming of childhood,
All men elsewhere - it is as if they wait
Some new event: the book he holds unread,
Her eyes fixed on the shadows overhead.

Tossed up like flotsam from a former passion,
How cool they lie. They hardly ever touch,
Or if they do it is like a confession
Of having little feeling - or too much.
Chastity faces them, a destination
For which their whole lives were a preparation.

Strangely apart, yet strangely close together,
Silence between them like a thread to hold
And not wind in. And time it self's a feather
Touching them gently. Do they know they're old,
These two who are my father and my mother
Whose fire from which I came, has now grown cold?
Structure
- 3 Stanzas
-Caesura: enforces the idea before the stop(punctuation mark ". ,").
Elizabeth compares two very different stages in human life. She compares a passionate marriage in youth to "one flesh’,” to a cold separate state in old age "Silence between them”.
Comparison:
Metaphor
The effect of time is compared to the touch of a feather.
Similie
Metaphor
Her parent´s love and passion at youth is compared to a "fire".
Repetition:
There is a steady rhyme throughout the poem that may represent the bond that existed all their lives between her parents. We can also guess they had a traditional marriage.
Sibilance:
There is a repetition of the "s" sound. This is clearly shown on the third stanza:
Strangely apart, yet strangely close together,
Silence between them like a thread to hold
And not wind in. And time it self's a feather

This emphasizes the idea of silence in the house, which may indicate that its members may not maintain even a conversation anymore.
Elizabeth Jennings
Situation
In this poem we can find a man and a woman who used to be married. They are separated now, they lie apart, pretending they don't acknowledge each other, however we have an idea they do.
Later on, we find that the narrator is the daughter of this marriage, who describes their parents love life now and then.
In the second stanza, we can follow the couple's past and future of their relationship. The author mentions how the couple's old bodies are like the waste (flotsam) from their years of love. Now that their passion is gone, the have grown physically apart, without any affection or physical contact. Any slight touch is a reminder of how unemotional they are or how they are unable to express themselves. This thought is accompanied by private pain they will never share with each other over what they both have lost.
Full transcript