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AAD 565, Unit 1: Ethical Behavior

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UK Arts Administration

on 2 May 2018

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Transcript of AAD 565, Unit 1: Ethical Behavior

Unit 1:
Ethical Behavior
1. Types of Ethical Behavior
2. Use of ethical behavior
A. Overview Of Consultancy Reports
A. Overview Of Consultancy Reports
Consultancy Report Template:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1FG4177brequODatmLHTGDAA5TYRqGrIJ5nrKHiiv2sY/edit
B. Overview Of Consultancy Arts Group Project
B. Overview Of Consultancy Arts Group Project
Definition: The argument itself, reasoning/rationale, logical evidence
LOGOS
Definition: The argument itself, reasoning/rationale, logical evidence
Types:
Theories/scientific facts
Indicated meanings (because…)
Literal or historical analogies
Definitions
Factual data & statistics
Quotations
Citations from experts & authorities
Informed opinions
Personal anecdotes
Types:
Theories/scientific facts
Indicated meanings (because…)
Literal or historical analogies
Definitions
Factual data & statistics
Quotations
Citations from experts & authorities
Informed opinions
Personal anecdotes
Definition: Words or passages author uses to activate emotions
PATHOS
PATHOS
Definition: Words or passages author uses to activate emotions
Types:
Emotionally loaded language
Vivid description
Anecdotes
Testimonies or narratives using feelings
Figurative language
Emotional tones
Types:
Author’s profession/background
Author’s publication
Appearing sincere, fair-minded, knowledgeable
Conceding to opposition where appropriate
Morally/ethically likeable
Appropriate language
Professional format
Types:
Author’s profession/background
Author’s publication
Appearing sincere, fair-minded, knowledgeable
Conceding to opposition where appropriate
Morally/ethically likeable
Appropriate language
Professional format
Michael J. Fox is a spokesperson on behalf of the Parkinson Foundation. The Foundation uses a well-respected actor who suffers from Parkinson’s Disease and continues in his profession despite his challenges.
Michael J. Fox is a spokesperson on behalf of the Parkinson Foundation. The Foundation uses a well-respected actor who suffers from Parkinson’s Disease and continues in his profession despite his challenges.
Sandy Hook Tragedy: A Case Study
READ: Sandy Hook Tragedy from course eReserves folder titled ‘Unit 1 - Connecticut governor orders review of gun laws’.
READ: Sandy Hook Tragedy from course eReserves folder titled ‘Unit 1 - Connecticut governor orders review of gun laws’.
POST EVENT
POST EVENT
READ: Sandy Hook Tragedy from course eReserves folder titled: ‘Unit 1 - Annotated Constitution Prototype.pdf’
READ: Sandy Hook Tragedy from course eReserves folder titled: ‘Unit 1 - Annotated Constitution Prototype.pdf’
POST EVENT
“A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.”
From State Constitution amendments
1998: “The people have the right to keep and bear arms for security, defense, hunting, recreation or any other lawful purpose.
1998: “The people have the right to keep and bear arms for security, defense, hunting, recreation or any other lawful purpose.
1986: “A person has the right to keep and bear arms for the defense of self, family, home and state, and for lawful hunting and recreational use.”
1986: “A person has the right to keep and bear arms for the defense of self, family, home and state, and for lawful hunting and recreational use.”
1891: “All men are, by nature, free and equal, and have certain inherent and inalienable rights, among which may be reckoned . . . [t]he right to bear arms in defense of themselves and of the State, subject to the power of the General Assembly to enact laws to prevent persons from carrying concealed weapons.”

1850: “That the rights of the citizens to bear arms in defence of themselves and the State shall not be questioned; but the general assembly may pass laws to prevent persons from carrying concealed arms.”

1799: “That the rights of the citizens to bear arms in defence of themselves and the State shall not be questioned.”
1891: “All men are, by nature, free and equal, and have certain inherent and inalienable rights, among which may be reckoned . . . [t]he right to bear arms in defense of themselves and of the State, subject to the power of the General Assembly to enact laws to prevent persons from carrying concealed weapons.”

1850: “That the rights of the citizens to bear arms in defence of themselves and the State shall not be questioned; but the general assembly may pass laws to prevent persons from carrying concealed arms.”

1799: “That the rights of the citizens to bear arms in defence of themselves and the State shall not be questioned.”
1868: “The citizens of this State shall have the right to keep and bear arms, for their common defense.”

1864: “That the free white men of this State shall have a right to keep and to bear arms for their common defence.”

1861: “That the free white men and Indians of this State have the right to keep and bear arms for their individual or common defense.”

1836: “That the free white men of this State shall have a right to keep and to bear arms for their common defence.”
1868: “The citizens of this State shall have the right to keep and bear arms, for their common defense.”

1864: “That the free white men of this State shall have a right to keep and to bear arms for their common defence.”

1861: “That the free white men and Indians of this State have the right to keep and bear arms for their individual or common defense.”

1836: “That the free white men of this State shall have a right to keep and to bear arms for their common defence.”
Using all of this information, applying the three types of persuasive appeal can help support or debunk arguments on both sides of an issue:
Using all of this information, applying the three types of persuasive appeal can help support or debunk arguments on both sides of an issue:
SCENARIO 1:
LOGOS: The US Constitution - how is it interpreted in support of a change in gun reform?
PATHOS: 20 innocent children - “If not now, when” urgency appeal
ETHOS: President of the United States speaking out in favor of gun reform
SCENARIO 1:
LOGOS: The US Constitution - how is it interpreted in support of a change in gun reform?
PATHOS: 20 innocent children - “If not now, when” urgency appeal
ETHOS: President of the United States speaking out in favor of gun reform
SCENARIO 2:
SCENARIO 2:
LOGOS: Assault weapons - are they included in the constitutional amendments?
PATHOS: Testimonies from family members of gun crime victims
ETHOS: National Rifle Association speaking out in opposition of gun reform
LOGOS: Assault weapons - are they included in the constitutional amendments?
PATHOS: Testimonies from family members of gun crime victims
ETHOS: National Rifle Association speaking out in opposition of gun reform
SCENARIO 3:
LOGOS: Canada and other countries that have strict gun policies
PATHOS: Facebook posts on all sides of the discussion
ETHOS: States vs. Federal decisions
SCENARIO 3:
LOGOS: Canada and other countries that have strict gun policies
PATHOS: Facebook posts on all sides of the discussion
ETHOS: States vs. Federal decisions
Definition: How the author builds character, credibility and trustworthiness; ethics
Definition: How the author builds character, credibility and trustworthiness; ethics
Definition: How the author builds character, credibility and trustworthiness; ethics
Full transcript