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Looking for Alaska

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by

Jenna Ellertson

on 22 November 2013

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Transcript of Looking for Alaska

Looking for Alaska
Swearing and Bad Language can be heard anywhere
Teenagers don't just hear bad language in books, but in everything around them. Many teenagers swear in general. They do this to sound like they are older
(NPR)
. Many teens than copy their peers, and even their parents
(NPR)
. Bad language can also rise immensely with exposure to adult programs and music
(NPR)
.
Conclusion
Looking for Alaska
isn't about characters using bad language, consuming alcohol, or having a minor sex scene,
Looking for Alaska
is about a boy named Miles finding out the meaning of life after a tragedy has struck in his school.
Miles Halter is a 16 year-old boy that moves from his family in Florida, to
a co-ed boarding school in Alabama. His roommate, "The Colonel" introduces Miles to a group of friends and an especially beautiful girl, Alaska Young, who asks him the meaning of life. Miles must figure that out after tragedy, and death.
Introduction
In L
ooking for Alaska
, there is offensive language, the consumption of alcohol by characters, and a sex scene within the book that is concerning parents. Parents believe that from it, the book is unfitted for the age group it was written for (young adults 12-18). It was in the top ten for most challenged books in 2012
(ALA)
.
Books can help readers learn the consequences of underage drinking
Underage drinking is a huge topic in America, and a major health problem
(CDC)
. People from the age of 12-20 drink 11% of all the alcohol consumed in America
(CDC)
. Not only will knowledge of underage drinking help, but books could help too. In books, people can see how underage drinking is, and show its effects on people's daily lives. This could show how bad underage drinking is and make the reader not want to do it or not worth it.
Although parents find
Looking for Alaska
concerning, the book has won many awards
Winner, 2006 Michael L. Printz Award
Finalist, 2005 Los Angeles Times Book Prize
2006 Top 10 Best Book for Young Adults
2006 Teens’ Top 10 Award
2006 Quick Pick for Reluctant Young Adult Readers
A New York Public Library Book for the Teen Age
A Booklist Editor’s Choice Pick
Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Selection
Borders Original Voices Selection
Thesis Statement
Although
Looking for Alaska
has explicit language, consumption of alcohol in it, and a minor two-paged sex scene, does not mean that the book should be censored or banned.
Opposing Views
Bibliography
"Porn Pushers - The ALA and Looking For Alaska -."
SafeLibraries.org
. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2013.

Aubrey, Allison. "Why Kids Curse."
NPR
. NPR, n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2013.

"Frequently Challenged Books of the 21st Century." American Library Association. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2013.

"Fact Sheets - Underage Drinking."
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 29 Oct. 2012. Web. 22 Nov. 2013.

"Looking for Alaska."
John Green
RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2013.
About
Parents are concerned that characters drinking in
Looking for Alaska
could influence readers to also drink
(SAFELIBRARIES)
.
The sex scene in the the book would be a little graphic for readers that aren't in high school which brings concern about the 12 and 13 year-olds that read this book
(SAFELIBRARIES)
.
Readers could "Monkey-See, Monkey-Do" due to the bad language, sex scene, and alcohol consumption in
Looking for Alaska

(SAFELIBBRARIES)
.
Full transcript