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Antebellum Slavery

Created by - Kurt, Leslie, Emily, Patrick, Sindre, Jade, Jonah
by

Kurt Watters

on 10 December 2010

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Transcript of Antebellum Slavery

Click anywhere & add an idea In 1790, there were a total of 59,000 free blacks combined in both North and South, then in 1830 the total number had risen to 219,000. 1. Who created this document?

Harriet Jacobs


2. When was this document created, and on what occasion?

1858, after she escaped to the North in 1842.


3. Who was the audience for this document? Who would have heard or seen it?

Any who would come across it, mostly whites in the North.


4. What is the main idea of this document? What does it want its audience to know, and what does it want its audience to do?


Sexual abuse of slave women, and as quoted she says, “This peculiar phase of Slavery has generally been kept veiled; but the public ought to be made acquainted with its monstrous features, and I willingly take the responsibility of presenting them with the veil withdrawn.” She wants the audience to know what is going on in slave life.

5. What does this document tell us about the time period in which it was produced?

It was a corrupt time of great segregation in the south of backs and whites. While the blacks were slaves, beaten and tortured all the time.



6. What most surprised, offended, or inspired you about this document?

That she could get it into public eyes.



7. What questions do you have about this document?

Did any whites support her? Was anyone even considering stopping her?
This map was made in 1830 that helped to show the census of free blacks and slaves in America. This map and census would have been for the general population... but mostly the white population, so they could see the amount of Blacks in America. From 1781 to 1830 the slave population increased from 575,000 to 2 million. It also shows that brutality and violence from Masters decreased after the slave trade was outlawed because the masters wanted to keep their slaves healthy because they couldn't replace the slaves as easily. This document was written by James Horton Benjemin Banneker Professor of American Studies and History at George Washington University. This is a modern document, talking about why we study the people with dark skin colour during those times. It is written for an audience who would be students or researchers, and other people who are in a quest for knowledge and information about people with dark skin color during this time period, and how that has shaped the American society of today. The main idea of this document is to further educate the reader and give them an appetite for the study of sociology. Harriet Jacobs wrote this document in 1858 (after she escaped to the North in 1842) highlighting the issue of sexual abuse of female slaves. She wrote this document for anyone who would come across it, but mostly whites in the North. Her main focus was the sexual abuse of slave women, and as quoted she says, “This peculiar phase of Slavery has generally been kept veiled; but the public ought to be made acquainted with its monstrous features, and I willingly take the responsibility of presenting them with the veil withdrawn.” She wants the audience to know what is going on in slave life. It was a corrupt time of great segregation in the south of backs and whites. While the blacks were slaves, beaten and tortured all the time. She wanted to get this particular issue into the public eyes. Cotton Gin creator Eli Whitney was a pioneer in the mass production of cotton. He was born in Westboro, Massachusetts on February 1794. He wanted to create a machine that made life as a slave easier The cotton gin is a machine that automated the separation of cottonseed from the short-staple cotton fiber. For the first time there was a faster, easier, and less painful way to separate the cotton seed. It quadrupled the amount of cotton being processed every day. People were in need of faster ways to separate the bad cotton seeds from the good. This picture of the cotton gin shows that farming was very popular in America, but it was becoming more industrialized. This picture is created by the lead’s anti-slavery series. It was published while slavery is still going on. It was more focused to show the cruelty of slavery.
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