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Korean Memorial

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by

Chris Gayon

on 23 October 2011

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Transcript of Korean Memorial

Korean Memorial The Memorial was build to honor members of the United States Armed Forces who served in the Korean War. President Bill Clinton and South Korean President Kim Young Sam dedicated the memorial on July 27, 1995. Cooper Lecky Architects designed the Korean Memorial. The Memorial was authorized by the U.S. Congress (Public Law 99-572) on October 28, 1986. Juniper bushes represent the rugged terrain in Korea. There are 19 life like stainless steel statues that are all a little over 7 feet tall and weigh nearly 1,000 pounds. They represent an American squad on patrol in Korea. Korean War
Memorial The memorial was dedicated on July 27, 1995, by President Bill Clinton and Kim Young Sam, President of the Republic of Korea. The memorial was built to honor members of the United States Armed Forces who served in the Korean War.


The original idea for a Korean War Memorial came from a Korean woman who was saved by American troops during the Korean War. It was designed by Cooper-Lecky Architects The Korean War Veterans Memorial was authorized by the U.S. Congress (Public Law 99-572) on October 28, 1986.
Today the Korean War memorial is being used for the same purpose it did ten years ago and that is to honor members of the United States Armed Forces who served in the Korean War. There are 19 life like stainless steel statues that are all a little over 7 feet tall and weight nearly 1,000 pounds. They represent an American squad on patrol in Korea. Juniper bushes and strips of granite represent the rugged terrain in Korea.

There is a 164 foot long, 8 inch thick highly polished "Academy Black" granite wall that weights more than 100 tons. More than 2,500 photographic, images are sandblasted onto the wall representing the land, sea and air troops who supported those who fought in the war. There is a Pool of Remembrance to honor the dead and missing, in the pool area there is a peninsula it symbolizes the Republic of Korea, which is a peninsula The Soldier’s ponchos look like they are blowing in the wind; this represents the harsh weather in Korea.

The statues are different ethnic groups such as African American, Caucasian, Native American, Hispanic, and Asian. The southern area of the memorial has Sharon hibiscus plants because that is the national flower of South Korea.

The total cost for the Korean war memorial was 16.5 million dollars. The memorial memorialized the Korean war (from 1950 to 1953). The memorial is in the form of a triangle intersecting a circle. Next to the “Pool of Remembrance” there is a list of the number of American and United Nation’s soldiers killed, wounded, missing in action, and pows. In 1993 the two-ton memorial was set in place by a helicopter.
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