Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Timeline of British Literature

This is an overview of British Literature from its Anglo history to present. This timeline is not all-inclusive, but covers the major contents for my senior English course at the International Berckley School
by

Ivan Ballestas

on 18 July 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Timeline of British Literature

William Caxton
What came before 449?
AD 449
1066
~750
~1000
Composed
Recorded
British Literature
Beowulf
The story of a hero. The best example of an Anglo-Saxon, and a superior warrior.
Does that sound familiar? Beowulf conveys the dreams, aspirations, and fears of the Anglo-Saxon people.
Julius Caesar
photo by mharrsch (Flickr)
In 55 BC, Julius Caesar Invaded Britain. He did so again (this time staying) in 54 BC. The Roman Empire became an established piece of British History until their departure in AD 407 under Emperor Contantine III.
In AD 63, Joseph of Arimathea made a missionary journey to Glastonbury in England (this would later become part of the Arthurian Legend of the Holy Grail).
Photo by drp (Flickr)
Hadrian's Wall
Created for the fortification of the Roman regions of England in AD 122.
Photo by Anita363 (Flickr)
Anglo-Saxon
Roman Occupation
55 BC
AD 407
The Celts
A Celtic shield, pre-Roman?
Picture from RachelH_ (Flickr)
Medieval
1485
Canterbury Tales
Geoffrey Chaucer's account of a group of pilgrims who are on their way to the chapel at Canterbury.
late 1300s
Le Morte d'Arthur
Sir Thomas Mallory adopted the stories of Arthur from the French (Normans). He finished his work at the end of the 1400s.
1470
Renaissance
1660
Shakespeare
The Cavalier Poets
John Donne
Elizabethan Period
Jacobean Period
Picture by tonynetone (Flickr)
Photo by lisby1 (Flickr)
Photo by Calotype46 (Flickr)
Oliver
Cromwell
1798
Neoclassical
The Restoration &
the Enlightenment
1832
1997
Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
by J.K. Rowling
1900
Romantic
Victorian
Modern
This era was defined by the French language (the language of the Normans) infiltrating Old English and transforming it to Middle English.
Old English was a derivative of languages of the Germanic and Scandanavian invaders mixed with the Roman Latin of the previous era.
Old English is language from the middle of the 5th to the beginning of the 12th century.
Alexander Pope
Jonathan Swift
Daniel Defoe
Samuel Johnson
Gulliver's Travels
Essays on Man
Robinson Crusoe
Dictionary of the English Language
1818
Language became closer to what we have today. During this era, the King James Bible was published, a version of the Bible that is still used in churches today.
Frankenstein's Monster
By Mary Shelley
1859
A Tale of Two Cities
by Charles Dickens
1932
A Brave New World
by Aldous Huxley
1949
1984
by George Orwell
?
42 years
1476
1484
Bayeux Tapestry
The Normans defeat the Anglo-Saxons to claim ownership of Briton. King Herold (shown with an arrow in his eye) loses the fight to William [later known as 'the conquerer'].
Canterbury Tales
Aesop's Fables
late 1400s
Everyman:
The Morality Play
Full transcript