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The Significance of Weapons in Macbeth

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Nickrooz Grami

on 25 November 2013

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Transcript of The Significance of Weapons in Macbeth

Weapons Symbolism in
Macbeth

Background
A blade is the rise to royalty and prosperity for Macbeth but also his downfall to tyranny and destruction.
An English Presentation by Hannah Cranham, Nickrooz Grami, Aurora Kendall, and Thomas Savas
This scene takes place in Macbeth’s castle, outside Duncan’s chamber. The quote occurs just before Macbeth kills Duncan to gain the title of King.


Quote
Um? Pardon?
“Is this a dagger I see before me? Let me grab it. I cannot grab it but I can still see it."
"Is this a dagger that I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee. I have thee not, yet I can see the still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight? or art thou but a dagger of the mind, a false creation, Proceeding from the heart oppressed brain?” (II, i, 40-46)

Significance
This quote relates to the plot, this takes place right before Macbeth kills Duncan. The dagger is a figment of Macbeth’s imagination and it guided him toward Duncan’s room so that Macbeth would kill him. Macbeth followed the dagger to the bed room where he then killed Duncan.

Background
Macbeth speaks to the ghost of Banquo which takes place in Macbeth’s castle during the feast.

Quote
“And dare me to desert thee with my sword” (III, iv, 105)

Um? Pardon?
Macbeth is speaking to Banquo's ghost and he is telling the ghost to dare Macbeth to take out his sword and fight him.

Significance
This quote relates to the plot because it lets us as the reader know that Macbeth has killed his best friend and is feeling guilty about it. This leads to a more paranoid and crazy Macbeth.
Setting/Themes
Background
This quote takes place in England, outside of King Edward’s castle. Macduff is trying to persuade Malcolm to come back to England to take his righteous spot on the throne.

Quote
“This avarice Sticks deeper, grows with more pernicious root Than summer-seeming lust, and it hath been The sword of our slain kings: yet do not fear; Scotland hath foisons to fill up your will of your mere own: all these are portable, with other graces weigh’d”
(IV ,iii, 96-102)

Um? Pardon?
The greed that you speak of is much worse than lust, because you will not outgrow it. Greed had been the bane to many rulers. But do not worry. Scotland has more than enough treasures to satisfy your wants and desires. The bad qualities you possess are manageable when balanced with your good qualities.

Significance
This quote is relevant to the theme of weapons because the word swords is in it. When Macduff uses the word sword, he does not mean the weapon. He uses the word as an analogy for death, by saying many Kings have died from being greedy and that Macbeth will be in turn another one of those kings.
Extended Analysis
Here, Macduff is speaking to Malcolm. Malcolm is unsure if he can trust Macduff, so he puts Macduff through a test of loyalty by saying that he is greedy and lustful and is unsure if he is able to be King. In this quote, Macduff is telling Malcolm that greed has been the downfall of many Kings, but not to worry about his greediness, Scotland has enough treasures to satisfy his needs. This shows how desperate Macduff and Scotland are for a new Ruler, and how evil Macbeth is.

Background
This quote takes place in the castle, shortly after Macbeth murders King Duncan. He is meeting with Lady Macbeth.

Plot
Quote
“Give me the daggers: the sleeping, and the dead Are but as pictures; ‘tis the eye of childhood That fears a painted devil. If he do bleed, I’ll gild the faces of the grooms withal, For it must seem their guilt. (II, ii, 69-73)

Um? Pardon?
Give me the daggers. People who are dead and asleep can’t hurt you anymore than a picture can. Only children are afraid of scary pictures. If Duncan bleeds I will paint the groomsmen’s faces with blood, blaming them. We must make it look like they killed Duncan.

Significance
This quote is relevant to the theme of weapons because it has the word daggers in it and it is one of the first parts of the play to talk about its main themes, such as murder and betrayal. Macbeth and Lady Macbeth are discussing Macbeth murdering Duncan, which is an act of betrayal, and Macbeth forgot to leave the daggers with Duncan’s groomsmen, so Lady Macbeth must go back and put them by the servants. This also shows how Macbeth's stupidity affects the plan and Lady Macbeth must fix his mistakes.
Character
Background
It is in this scene that Macbeth is known as being brave and is right after the battle he has with rebel forces who oppose King Duncan.
Significance
The soldier explains how Macbeth was known and seen by his peers at the beginning of the play. He was a brave soldier, who fought with his sword and did not back down until he won the war. The soldier also explains, that Macbeth deserves to be claimed brave because of his noble actions in the war.

Quote
“For brave Macbeth well deserves that name Disdaining fortune with his brandish’d steel, Which smoked with bloody execution." (I, ii, 18-20)

Um? Pardon?
Macbeth remains a brave soldier who defeated the odds and sliced Macdonwald. His blade is coated with blood that creates smoke on it.
Background
After the death of Duncan, other people begin to question the murder and Donalbain, son of the former king explains how all people are not what they seem.
Quote
“There’s daggers in men’s smiles” (II, iii, 164)

Um? Pardon?
Men will coat their true intentions with a facade or smile, hiding their inner evil motives.
Significance
This quote is said after the murder of the King, King Duncan. This is the moment that Macbeth has changed his character in the play. It shows that people hide behind their smiles, and become someone who they don’t show themselves to be (in this case, many people would smile with their daggers, proving that they are villains, not heroes. Which Macbeth shown throughout the play, that he was a noble man, but he smiled through his dagger and became a tragic hero.

Introduction
Outside elements including weapons affect Macbeth and his surroundings all the while sparking greed and selfishness from within himself.
Atmosphere
Introduction
The atmosphere of Macbeth is heavily influenced by weapons as they are the true source of evil in the play.

Background
An army captain speaks to King Duncan about the bravery and honour of both Macbeth and Banquo while leading the King’s army to victory against rebel forces.
Quote
“As cannons overcharged with double cracks, So they doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe.” (I, ii, 40)
Um? Pardon?
The quote explains how Banquo and Macbeth could be seen as very powerful cannons with double ammo in the battlefield.
Significance
The quote signifies the strength and valor of the two men and explains (in the form of a metaphor) how the two men are fought stronger than ever (double their strength). It states that they were even like cannons with double ammunition (that is how much power and perseverance they had as generals in the army). In turn, They are seen as war heros. The two men are compared to weapons which is relevant as Macbeth will hurt Duncan with a weapon leading in the king's death.
Background
Macbeth is talking to himself in a soliloquy expressing his true intentions on murdering the king and taking his throne. We can see how his conscience and ethics plays a major role in the future murder.
Quote
“To plague th' inventor: this even-handed justice Commends the ingredients of our poisoned chalice To our own lips." (I,vii, 11)
Significance
Macbeth talks to himself about his ambition, his plan to kill the King and take his place on the throne. The quote signifies how Macbeth realizes that justice serves a fair hand to all and that in the end all people will receive the poison that they attempt to serve others. Essentially this refers to the idea of karma or how evil deeds cycle around and hurt the man or woman that commits them. This gives the play an atmosphere of confusion as Macbeth is doubting his goals to kill Duncan.
Um? Pardon?
The quote states that the inventor of plague who uses it as a weapon against others will face the consequences of drinking the plague itself, hurting him.
Introduction
Macbeth was known by all for being brave, but with the ruling power of weapons, his character changed over time.

Introduction
The tragedy of Macbeth is based around death and weapons causing death whcih appear in many different forms.
Extended Analysis
The atmosphere of the play is seen as one full of trust and allegiance as Duncan and the other soldiers believe him and in his intentions. Sadly, as the play begins to unfold an atmosphere with more darkness and insanity takes place (Macbeth goes crazy).
Thank you!
We hope this gave you insight on how Macbeth was deeply affected by the weapons he wielded, leading in his eventual demise.
Full transcript