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Moving toward Literary Analysis

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by

Gina M. Sully

on 18 August 2016

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Transcript of Moving toward Literary Analysis

Read closely
Overview of the Process
Break It Up, Read Closely,
Annotate, and Summarize
Five days a week the lowest paid substitute teacher in the district drives her father’s used Mercury to Hough and 79th, where she eases it, mud flaps and all, down the ramp into the garage of Patrick Henry Junior High,
a school where
she’ll teach back-to- back classes without so much as a coffee break and all of this depressing her until she remembers her date last night, and hopes it might lead to bigger things, maybe love,

so
she quickens her pace towards the main office to pick up her class lists with the names of students she’ll never know as well as she has come to know the specials in the cafeteria, where she hopes the coffee will be perking and someone will have brought in those doughnuts she’s come to love so much, loves more than the idea of teaching seventh-graders the meaning of a poem
,
because after all
she’s a sub who’ll finish her day, head south to her father’s house, and at dinner he’ll ask her how her job is going, and she’ll say okay, and he’ll remind her that it might lead to a full-time position with benefits but she knows what teaching in that school is like,
and her date from last night calls to ask if she’s busy and she says yes because she’s promised her father she’d wash his car and promises to her father are sacred since her mother died, besides it’s the least she can do now that he lets her drive his car five days a week towards the big lake, to the NE corner of Hough and 79th and you know the rest.
Our Working Thesis
Our Text
October 2015
Moving toward Literary Analysis
Annotate as you read
Summarize each section in your own words
Break longer texts into sections
Identify the rhetorical purpose of each section
Identify literal and conceptual patterns
Identify anomalies
Draw conclusions from patterns and anomalies
Compose working thesis
TIP
: It's easier
to revise your
working thesis
to conform to
the essay's
structure than
it is to revise
the essay to
match the
thesis' structure.
Composed by Gina M. Sully for the UNLV Writing Center,
October, 2015
Writing Center
"Waiting," by Peggy McNally
Five days a week the lowest paid substitute teacher in the district drives her father’s used Mercury to Hough and 79th, where she eases it, mud flaps and all, down the ramp into the garage of Patrick Henry Junior High, a school where she’ll teach back-to- back classes without so much as a coffee break and all of this depressing her until she remembers her date last night, and hopes it might lead to bigger things, maybe love, so she quickens her pace towards the main office to pick up her class lists with the names of students she’ll never know as well as she has come to know the specials in the cafeteria, where she hopes the coffee will be perking and someone will have brought in those doughnuts she’s come to love so much, loves more than the idea of teaching seventh-graders the meaning of a poem, because after all she’s a sub who’ll finish her day, head south to her father’s house, and at dinner he’ll ask her how her job is going, and she’ll say okay, and he’ll remind her that it might lead to a full-time position with benefits but she knows what teaching in that school is like, and her date from last night calls to ask if she’s busy and she says yes because she’s promised her father she’d wash his car and promises to her father are sacred since her mother died, besides it’s the least she can do now that he lets her drive his car five days a week towards the big lake, to the NE corner of Hough and 79th and you know the rest.
From
Microfiction
, Ed. Jerome Stern; New York: WW Norton, 1996. 118-119. Print.
Peggy is depressed as she drives her father’s car to work, but she gets hopeful when she thinks about the previous night’s date.
Peggy doesn’t know her students very well and doesn’t like her job.
Peggy will hide her despair over her work from her father.
Peggy’s hope for another date is dashed because she cannot break a promise to her father.
The Rhetorical Situation
Author, Title, Publication Context, & Anticipated Audience
Genre
Purposes
In the micro-story "Waiting," Peggy McNally conveys the disengagement and loss of hope experienced by many American millennials after college graduation through her use of rhythm, characterization, and imagery.
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