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"Common Sense" by Thomas Paine

An Advanced English 10 presentation of the analysis of Thomas Paine's "Common Sense."
by

Lauren Rachow

on 22 May 2013

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Transcript of "Common Sense" by Thomas Paine

"Common Sense" by Thomas Paine Sara Steybe, Cadey Carey, Phoebe Albert, Lilly Church, and Lauren Rachow Thesis Our Summary Rhetorical Question
(Pathos) The End "In the following pages I offer nothing more than simple facts, plain arguments, and common sense; and have no other preliminaries to settle with the reader, than that he will divest himself of prejudice and possession, and suffer his reason and his feelings to determine for themselves" (1)

In this document, I talk about topics well known; I don't want to argue with any readers. This is simply my take on this subject, so feelings will have to be put aside. It's time to split from Britain. They have done too many evils to us to continue an alliance with. We deserve independence and the right to freedom. Why should we deprive ourselves of this simple necessity? "We are already greater than the king wishes us to be, and will he not hereafter endeavour to make us less? To bring the matter to one point. Is the power who is jealous of our prosperity, a proper power to govern us?" (34). "But if you say, you can still pass the violations over, then ask, Hath your houses been burnt? Hath your property been destroyed before your face? Are your wife and children destitute of a bed to lie on, or bread to live on?" (23). Contribution: persuades reader to lose faith in the King and everything that involves England because of their rash actions toward the United States and many other countries Tone
(Pathos) "For this continent would never suffer itself to be drained of inhabitants, to support the British arm in either Asia, Africa, or Europe" (3). "Your future connection with Britain, whom you can neither love nor honour, will be forced and unnatural, and being formed only on the plan of present convenience, will in a little time fall into a relapse more wretched than the first" (4). Contribution: persuades people to fight Britain in a more aggressive fashion by pushing his beliefs on others Simile
(Logos) "Europe regards her like a stranger, and England hath given her warning to depart" (10). ( some personification too!) Contribution: gives readers a comparison of what they may not know and something they should know while also comparing England to a person through logic Metaphor
(Logos) "But examine the passions and feelings of mankind, Bring the doctrine of reconciliation to the touchstone of nature, and then tell me, whether you can hereafter love, honour, and faithfully serve the power that hath carried fire and sword into your land?" (4). Contribution: gives readers a comparison of what they may not know and something they should know by causing the audience to have anger towards England
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