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ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION

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michelle gallagher

on 24 January 2016

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Transcript of ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION

"Assistive technology (AT) is any kind of technology that enables a student with a disability to perform a given task more effectively, efficiently, or with a greater degree of independence. "


http://www.atinternetmodules.org/mod_view.php?nav_id=1823
What is Assistive Technology in school?
Did you know everyone uses Assistive Technology?
Every time you use a remote control to change the channel on your T.V. , enter something in your day planner, set a kitchen timer, put on your glasses or use your smart phone YOU are using Assistive Technology! Assitive Technology is a larger part of everyday life for just about all people, we just don't think about it that way.
Consider Assitive Technology For All Students With Disabilities !
Assitive Technology and IDEA
The individuals with Disability Act Amendments of 1997 defines AT as:
“Any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially, off the shelf, modified, customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve the functional capabilities of a child with a disability”(IDEA, 1997,20, USC, Ch. 33, Sec. 1401 [25] US.).

Michelle Gallagher, M.Ed.
ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY
AT SCHOOL

When we hear
the word
"technology"
we automatically
think "computers."
Technology can be any tool that
enables a student to perform
better. It can be high tech like a computer
or low tech like a pencil grip.
HOW DOES IDEA CATERGORIZE
DISABILITY?

Autism
Deaf-blindness
Deafness
Developmental delay
Emotional disturbance
Hearing impairment
Intellectual disability
Multiple disabilities
Orthopedic impairment
Other health impairment
Specific learning disability
Speech or language impairment
Traumatic brain injury
Visual impairment, including blindness
We will look at how assitive technology may be used in school to service students with disabilities.
How does Assitive Technology help a student with Austism?

Typically, children with autism process visual information easier than auditory information. Any time we use assistive technology devices with these children, we're giving them information through their strongest processing area (visual). Therefore various types of technology from "low" tech to "high" tech, should be incorporated into every aspect of daily living in order to improve the functional capabilities of children with autism. (http://www.specialed.us/autism/assist/asst10.htm)




IDEA 2004 requires IEP teams to consider the assistive technology needs of all children with disabilities. (20 U.S.C. 1414(d)(3)(B)(v))

The IEP team makes decisions about assistive technology devices and services based on your child’s unique needs so that he can be more confident and independent. The law requires schools to use assistive technology devices and services "to maximize accessibility for children with disabilities." (20 U.S.C. 1400(c)(5)(H))


If the IEP team determines that your child needs assistive technology devices and services, the school district is responsible for providing these and cannot use lack of availability or cost as an excuse.

Note: Assistive technology is not a substitute for teaching your child to read and write.

- See more at: http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/atech.index.htm#sthash.QPO1VcKS.dpuf
http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/atech.index.htm
"Individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing utilize a variety of assistive technologies that provide them with improved accessibility in numerous environments. Most devices either provide amplified sound or alternate ways to access information through vision and/or vibration. These technologies can be grouped into three general categories: hearing technology; alerting devices; and communication supports." (http://www.wati.org/content/supports/free/pdf/Ch13-Hearing.pdf)
ASSITIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR DEAF BLINDNESS
STUDENTS WITH PRINT DISABILITIES.
"For many students with disabilities, the limitations of print raises barriers to access, and therefore to learning. Following the passage of the IDEA in 1997 and more recent reauthorizations, it has become essential that all students have access to the general curriculum, and thus to print materials."
http://www.wati.org/content/supports/free/pdf/Ch7-Reading.pdf
ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR COMMUNICATION
"Communication is the process of exchanging information about our wants/need, experiences, ideas, thoughts and feelings. The basic elements of a successful communication exchange requires that there be a:
sender (communicator)
receiver (communication partner)
shared understanding of the communication mode being used reason (intent) for the communication exchange to take place." http://www.wati.org/content/supports/free/pdf/Ch3-Communication.pdf
Will giving a child an AAC device lower their chance of speaking effectively?
"By providing a child with a variety of means to communicate, including speech, the pressure to produce speech is diminished. In the past, clinicians and parents worried that giving a child another means to communicate would hinder speech development. Children who are given augmentative skills develop speech as quickly as the control group and often surpass them."

http://www.wati.org/content/supports/free/pdf/Ch3-Communication.pdf
"Several reasons are cited for this phenomenon. The pressure to produce intelligible speech may be reduced knowing that the child has an alternative way to say something. The use of augmentative communication systems allows the child’s language skills to continue to grow and develop. Using speech is the easiest way to communicate. If the child is able to use it, they will choose speech over an alternative form of communication. There is research that supports introducing AAC at an early age before a student experiences communication failure because of a lack of speech production or intelligibility (Romski & Sevcik, 2005)."

http://www.wati.org/content/supports/free/pdf/Ch3-Communication.pdf
"Augmentative/Alternative Communication (AAC) refers to the methods used to maximize the communication abilities of individuals whose natural speech is either temporarily or permanently impaired. These methods involve the use of aided and/or unaided symbols. Aided symbols require some type of tangible representation. Examples include: real objects, Picture Communication Symbols, letters and/or words. These can be presented on a non-electronic communication board or displayed on an electronic communication device. Unaided symbols are those that are produced using the individual’s body and may include gesture, sign and/or fingerspelling (ASHA, 2002)."



http://www.wati.org/content/supports/free/pdf/Ch3-Communication.pdf


AUGMENTATIVE/ALTERNATIVE COMMUNIATION (AAC)
SUMMARY OF HOW ASSITIVE TECHNOLOGY CAN HELP STUDENTS IN THE CLASSROOM
"Technology helps students with disabilities on many different levels. It can help them accomplish tasks like:

Master grade-level content. Technology presents the material in different forms (visually, auditorially, etc.)

Improve writing and organizational skills. Technology can enable students with learning disabilities or autism to do such things as develop a concept map for a research paper and write using grade-level vocabulary or words they otherwise wouldn't use without a computer due to poor spelling skills.

Work towards grade-level reading skills. The computer either reads the text digitally or presents it at a lower grade level for students with reading disabilities or visual impairments.

Improve note-taking skills. Many students with disabilities have difficulty taking notes in longhand because of poor spelling, writing, and/or eye-hand coordination skills.

Master educational concepts that would otherwise have been beyond their reach. Students can experience abstract concepts such as the growth of a flower through 3-D simulations."

http://www.sc.edu/scatp/cdrom/atused.html
"A student with physical disabilities who is positioned correctly is better able to pay attention, focus for longer periods of time, and access learning materials. Examples of equipment used for positioning are sidelying frames, walkers, chair inserts, standing aids, and beanbag chairs."


http://www.sc.edu/scatp/cdrom/atused.html
POSITIONING IS IMPORTANT TO HELP A STUDENT LEARN
ASSITIVE TECHNOLOGY TO PARTICIPATE IN CLASSWORK
"To do class work and homework, some students need devices that provide access to computers or environmental controls. Examples of access technology are special switches, modified keyboards, head pointers, and keyguards. Independent use of equipment in the classroom is a possibility for students with physical disabilities through environmental controls such as remote controls and special adaptations of on/off switches to make them accessible. Students who are nonverbal, dysfluent or who have articulation problems may benefit from using a wide variety of communication devices."

http://www.sc.edu/scatp/cdrom/atused.html
"Because listening is an important part of the classroom experience, some students need assistive devices for hearing such as hearing aids, personal FM units, or closed-captioned TV. Special listening systems can help a child with a hearing loss “tune in” to the teacher’s voice from a distance. Many students rely on their vision as a primary mode for learning. Technology can be used to help these students by increasing contrast, enlarging stimuli, and making use of tactile and auditory modes. Devices that help with vision include screen readers, screen enlargers, magnifiers, audio books, Braillers, light boxes, and scanners."

http://www.sc.edu/scatp/cdrom/atused.html
ASSISITIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR LISTENING AND
VISION IN THE CLASSROOM
WHEN STUDENTS HAVE THE TOOLS THEY NEED TO SUCCEED AND EFFECTIVELY ACCESS THE CURRICULUM, TEACHERS GREATLY BENEFIT BECAUSE THEN THEY CAN BECOME EFFECTIVE TEACHERS.
PLEASE WATCH THE VIDEO TO SEE VARIOUS WAYS ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY CAN BENEFIT STUDETS WITH AUTISM.
PLEASE WATCH THE VIDEO TO SEE VARIOUS WAYS ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY CAN BENEFIT STUDENTS WITH VISION AND HEARING IMPAIRMENT.
PLEASE WATCH THE VIDEO TO LEARN ABOUT SOME SIMPLE WAYS TO USE ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR STUDENTS WITH PRINT DISABILITIES.
Please watch the video below to see Assistive Technology for Communication needs in action!
But my building already has an I.T. department isn't that the same thing as Assistive Technology?
Instructional and Information Technology are different than Assistive Technolgogy!
"The Instructional Technology Department utilizes technology to support curriculum, instruction and assessment. Providing 21st century tools, such as iPads, SmartBoards, response systems, digital cameras, laptops, multimedia and online learning, enables teachers to engage students, differentiate learning, and improve student outcomes. Professional Development, coaching and consultation provides support to schools and classroom teams to maximize student learning." http://www.nsseo.org/services/at-and-tec/
INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY
INFORMATIONAL TECHNOLOGY
The Informational Technology Department provides a robust network of wired and wireless devices, telecommunications and the infrastructure necessary to support administrative, instructional and assistive technologies. It provides the tools necessary for student learning.

http://www.nsseo.org/services/at-and-tec/

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY
“The Assistive Technology Department helps teams in the consideration, acquisition, implementation and effective monitoring of assistive technology. This is accomplished through the use of trials of low tech through high tech tools to provide augmentative and /or alternative communication and individualized supports to help students’ access curriculum and achieve success in their educational program.”
http://www.nsseo.org/services/at-and-tec/

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY IN A
UNIVERSAL DESIGN ENVIRONMENT
WHAT IS UNIVERSAL DESIGN?
"Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is an approach to teaching, learning, curriculum development and assessment that uses new technologies to respond to a variety of individual learner differences. IDEA 2004 defines Universal Design using the same definition as the Assistive Technology Act of 1998, as amended, 29 U.S.C. 3002.( 34CFR§ 300.44):"
http://www.wrightslaw.com/blog/?p=8453#sthash.dovnPCtx.dpuf
"Simply put, UDL allows all students to access information and be evaluated in ways that take advantage of their abilities—rather than requiring them to learn in ways that allow their deficits to become barriers to success.”
http://www.wrightslaw.com/blog/?p=8453#sthash.dovnPCtx.dpuf
"Universal Design for Learning and Assistive Technology - Building accessibility into new technologies and curricular materials as they are developed will help to ensure the maximal inclusion of children with disabilities into the full array of learning opportunities that are available to all children." http://www.wrightslaw.com/infoatech.index.htm#sthash.xUEkIvXa.dpuf
Full transcript