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Holes

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EDU448 OTECA

on 26 November 2012

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Transcript of Holes

While walking home from school one day, Stanley Yelnats is hot over the head with a pair of sneakers that have fallen from an overpass. Stanley is stopped by the police and arrested. It turns out that the sneakers had been stolen from a homeless shelter where they were being auctioned off to raise money. Stanley blames his bad luck on his great-great grandfather, Elya Yelnats, who had forgotten a promise and therefore him and his descendants became cursed. As a result, Stanley is sent to a juvenile detention center, Camp Green Lake. This camp is located in the heat of West Texas, has no lake and is certainly not green. Camp Green Lake is run by an evil warden, who makes each inmate dig a hole a day (five feet wide by five feet deep). Inmates are told that digging holes builds character, and they are to report anything “interesting” that they dig up to the warden, who is in search of a treasure. Stanley finds a lipstick tube that belonged to “Kissin’ Kate Barlow” a notorious outlaw, whose treasure the warden is looking for. She was a schoolteacher at Camp Green Lake 10 years ago and her life was destroyed when the town’s people killed her love interest Sam. She began robbing banks and killing townspeople. Stanley agrees to teach one of his friends Zero, how to read. This gets both boys in trouble and Zero runs away. Stanley set’s out to save Zero and they both find refuge at the top of a mountain called “God’s Thumb.” Zero confesses to stealing the shoes that Stanley was accused of stealing and they decide to return to camp to find Kate Barlow’s treasure. They find the treasure in the hole where Stanley had first found the lipstick tube. It had belonged to the first Stanley Yelnats, which contained contents valuable enough to buy his parents a house and hire a detective to find Zeros mother. SUMMARY

While walking home from school one day, Stanley Yelnats is hot over the head with a pair of sneakers that have fallen from an overpass. Stanley is stopped by the police and arrested. It turns out that the sneakers had been stolen from a homeless shelter where they were being auctioned off to raise money. Stanley blames his bad luck on his great-great grandfather, Elya Yelnats, who had forgotten a promise and therefore him and his descendants became cursed.
As a result, Stanley is sent to a juvenile detention center, Camp Green Lake. This camp is located in the heat of West Texas, has no lake and is certainly not green. Camp Green Lake is run by an evil warden, who makes each inmate dig a hole a day (five feet wide by five feet deep). Inmates are told that digging holes builds character, and they are to report anything “interesting” that they dig up to the warden, who is in search of a treasure.
Stanley finds a lipstick tube that belonged to “Kissin’ Kate Barlow” a notorious outlaw, whose treasure the warden is looking for. She was a schoolteacher at Camp Green Lake 10 years ago and her life was destroyed when the town’s people killed her love interest Sam. She began robbing banks and killing townspeople.
Stanley agrees to teach one of his friends Zero, how to read. This gets both boys in trouble and Zero runs away. Stanley set’s out to save Zero and they both find refuge at the top of a mountain called “God’s Thumb.” Zero confesses to stealing the shoes that Stanley was accused of stealing and they decide to return to camp to find Kate Barlow’s treasure. They find the treasure in the hole where Stanley had first found the lipstick tube. It had belonged to the first Stanley Yelnats, which contained contents valuable enough to buy his parents a house and hire a detective to find Zeros mother. ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Louis Sachar was born in East Meadow, New York. He attended the University of California at Berkeley and worked at Hillside Elementary as a teacher’s aide. He always wanted to write and he didn't like the stories that the students at Hillside Elementary were reading. So he wrote his first book Sideways Stories from Wayside School. His story did not sell many copies, so he attended law school while continuing to write on the side. He moved to Texas with his wife and his hatred of the summer heat gave him the idea to write Holes. Louis Sachar said that when he writes, he tried to please only one reader, himself.

Rational
Holes is a great novel to read to grade 6 students. It's plot is engaging, fun, and enjoyable for junior students of all ages. The story line takes place in both the present and past, allowing students to use their imagination and critical thinking skills to put pieces of the story together. Many students are able to relate to the main character Stanley, where no matter what he does, is unable to get ahead in life. Have you ever been blamed for something you didn't do? Like Stanley, many young children can relate to and understand his struggle. This novel demonstrates a number of educational lessons that can be incorporated into the grade 6 curriculum in a variety of fun and engaging ways. This unit plan is full of engaging activities that involve working in groups. Most students enjoy working in groups, interacting with their peers and exchanging ideas. This unit plan has a great deal of involvement, which allows students to circulate around the classroom, learning by doing, and having fun at the same time. LESSON 1: Brochure
Expectations
Media literacy:
•1.1 Explain how a variety of media texts address their intended purpose and audience
•1.4 explain why different audiences might have different responses to media texts •3.4 produce a variety of media texts for specific purposes and audiences, using appropriate forms, conversations, and techniques

Writing
•2.2 establish a distinctive voice in their writing appropriate to the subject and audience
•2.3 use some vivid and/or figurative language and innovative expressions to enhance interest Teaching and Learning Strategies

Students are to imagine that Camp Green Lake is a typical camp. They are to design a realistic and serious brochure to advertise the camp. Their brochures should include information informing parents what their children will experience if sentenced to Camp Green Lake. As well as information about location, organized activities, skills that campers will learn, sleeping/eating facilities etc. Brochures can be persuasive, humorous, or a parody of a fun summer camp. It might help students to get ideas for content, layout, and design by looking at real brochures. So we will bring in brochures from other places and have the students engage in a group discussion on a variety of questions including: what is this camp trying to sell? How does this brochure appeal to you? In addition, we will have students from previous years come in a model their brochures. Materials
•Variety of heavy 81/2 x11’’ paper (white or coloured)
•Construction paper
•Markers
•Rulers
•Scissors
•Glue
•Magazines (to cut pictures from)•Any other creative supplies Materials
•Variety of heavy 81/2 x11’’ paper (white or coloured)
•Construction paper
•Markers
•Rulers
•Scissors
•Glue
•Magazines (to cut pictures from)
•Any other creative supplies LESSON 2: Camp Green Lake T-Shit
Expectations

Visual Arts

•D1.3 use elements of design in art works to communicate idea’s messages, and understandings LESSON 2: Camp Green Lake T-Shirt
Expectations
Visual Arts
D1.3 Use elements of design in art works to communicate idea’s messages, and understandings
Writing
2.3 Use some vivid and/or figurative language and innovative expressions to enhance interest
3.4 Use punctuation appropriately to communicate their intended meaning in longer and more complex sentences, with a focus on the use of: commas etc.
3.7 Use a range of appropriate elements of effective presentation in the finished product, including print, script, different fronts, graphics, and layout Materials

•Plain t-shirt (white works best)
•Scissors
•Cardboard
•Poster board or large piece of paper to practice your design before transferring it onto t-shirt
•Paint
•Paint brushes Teaching and Learning Strategies

Students are to create a catchy slogan to represent Camp Green Lake and add the appropriate artwork. Students are to transfer it onto a plain white T-shirt. Working in teams creating and presenting their camp t-shirts. Prior to starting the activity we will present the students with examples of real camps and their t-shirts. In addition, we will show them pictures and make them decipher what the slogan is. Example Nike and "Just do it."

Materials
Plain t-shirt (white works best)
Scissors
Cardboard
Poster board or large piece of paper to practice your design before transferring it onto t-shirt
Paint
Paint brushes LESSON 3: Map of Texas (Social Studies)
Expectations

Map, Globe, Graphic Skills (Canada’s Links to world)
• Use base maps and a variety of information sources to sketch the relative
position of places
• Create maps using shading/colour to show details of the physical
characteristics of regions (e.g., agriculture, climate, elevation)
Writing
3.4 Use punctuation appropriately to communicate their intended meaning in longer and more complex sentences, with a focus on the use of: commas etc.
3.5 Use parts of speech correctly to communicate their meaning clearly, with a focus on the use of: personal subject and object pronouns 3.7 Use a range of appropriate elements of effective presentation in the finished product, including print, script, different fronts, graphics, and layout Teaching and Learning Strategies

What’s West Texas Really Like? Students will study the State of Texas and compare their findings to Canada.
• Using a Texas or United States map students will locate the Western area of Texas
• Students will study diverse geography ranging from flat plains to canyons to mountains
• Students will study dangerous animals include cougars, rattlesnakes, and scorpions as demonstrated in Holes
• Students will write a journal entry making connections between Canada and Texas (similarities/differences) Materials
Journal paper
Map of United States
Pencil crayons
Library time to research
Books on Texas and Canadian landform's LESSON 4: Bullying Skit (Religion/Drama)
Expectations
B1.1 engage actively in drama exploration and role play, with a focus on identifying and examining a range of issues, themes, and ides from a variety of fiction and non-fiction sources and diverse communities, times, and places
B1.4 communicate feelings, thoughts, and ideas to a specific audience, using audio, visual, and/or technological aids to strengthen the impact on the viewer Teaching and Learning Strategies

In Holes there are several situations which involve bullies. Students will be divided into size appropriate groups to discuss and plan their responses and/or actions in the following scenarios. Students are to act out their scenarios for the class. Then students will reflect on each scenario and a class discussion will be held.

Example of possible scenarios:

1. A large student with a reputation for meanness catches you alone in the bathroom at school. He threatens to beat you up if you do not pay him $5.00
2. Another student in your class wants to copy off your paper during a test. He threatens to spread false rumors about you if you do not let him.
3. You and your friends are playing basketball in the park. A group of older kids arrive and take over the court. Materials
The skits
Props
Class time Materials

Lined paper to write scenarios
Class time
Props (example dress up clothes) LESSON 5: Science
Expectation

Understanding Life Systems and Bio Diversity
2.3 Use scientific inquiry/ research skills to compare the characteristics of organisms within the plant or animal kingdoms. (e.g. compare the characteristics of a snake and bangled tiger, chimpanzee and a toucan bird) Teaching and Learning strategies

For this assignment, students will work in groups of four. Student's are to choose any two animals that live in a hot climate and prepare a presentation for the class. Students may decide to pick an animal that was outlined in Holes and compare the two according to their biological makeup(anatomy), the way they are born, what they eat, how they mate etc. Students are to then place each animal in their animal class (e.g. mammals, birds, fishes, reptiles, amphibians, invertebrates) and present their findings to the class. Materials
Computer
Books
Science bristol board
Construction paper
Scissors LESSON 6: Kissing’ Kate Barlow’s Spiced Peaches (Science)
Expectations

Understanding matter and Energy: Electricity and Electrical Devices
3.5 Identify ways in which electrical energy is transformed into other forms of energy (e.g. electrical energy is transformed into heat) Teaching and Learning Strategies

For this assignment students will work in groups of 3 or 4, to discuss how electricity can produce heat. Each group will brain storm ideas on chart paper and a class discussion will be held. Probing questions will be asked such as "how is electricity transformed into light in a light bulb?"

In the book Holes, the residents of Green Lake call Miss Katherine’s spiced peaches “food for the angels.” After student's learn about electricity and the variety of ways in which heat can be produced, they will re-create Kate Barlow's prize- winning spiced peaches. Materials

Chart paper
Markers
Ingredients to make spiced peaches:
1 can (29 ounces) peach halves, drained (save the syrup in a separate bowl)2/3 cup apple cider vinegar1 cup light brown sugar, packed1/4 teaspoon salt8 whole cloves1 cinnamon stick1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
Directions:
In a saucepan, combine 2/3 cup of the peach syrup with all the other ingredients except the peaches. Simmer uncovered for 10 minutes. Pour over peaches. Cool, then cover and chill for at least 24 hours (or 110 years!).Bring to room temperature and eat.
Any leftover peaches will keep in the refrigerator for a week.-Serves 6. LESSON 7: Sundial
Expectation
Science
2.2 Use technological problem-solving skills to design, build, and test devices (i.e. a sundial) for investigating the motions of different bodies in the solar system
Writing
2.4 Create complex sentences by combining phrases, clauses, and/or simple sentences
2.5 Identify their point of view and other possible points of view; determine, when appropriate, if their own view is balances and supported by the evidence; and adjust their thinking and expression if appropriate Teaching and Learning Strategies

The boy's of Camp Green Lake would have found it very useful to have a sundial to tell time while digging their holes in the hot desert sun. Students will work in groups of 3 or 4 to create their very own sundial. This project will take place after students are educated on how the earth rotates around the sun. Students will then be taught how to construct a sundial. Once they have completed their group assignment students are to individually write a short paragraph explaining how the characters in Holes may have benefited from having a sundial. Materials

Scissors
A compass
Some sellotape
A craft knife
A print-out of the two sundial templates
Journal's
Pens LESSON 8: The Great Zeroni (Math)
Expectations
Number Sense and Numeration

Use a variety of mental strategies to solve addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division problems involving whole numbers
Solve problems involving the multiplication and division of whole numbers (four-digit two- digit), using a variety of tools (e.g concrete materials, drawings, calculators) and strategies (e.g estimation, algorithms) Teaching and Learning Strategies

-Have students play the game “The Great Zeroni”
-Will have to work as a team to get the correct math problems within their group, the group to
have answer the question correctly and first gets a complete hole
-The group with the most holes dug win
-enhance their mental math abilities by using combination of flash cards and word problems
-And work together to solve difficult questions as a group and learn through teaching and
helping each other
-have the desks split in half when they get back from recess
-have the game name “Zeroni” big on the board and have game show music being played in the
background
-have the students create their own team name
-have the winning team choose from 3 or 4 games to be played in gym class that week Teaching and Learning Strategies

As a class students will play the game “The Great Zeroni”
The class will be divided into two teams and they will have to work as a team to answer the math problems
For each correct answer the group will earn a "hole" and at the end of the game the group with the most "holes dug" is the winner
This rapid math challenge will enhance students mental math abilities by using combination of flash cards and word problems. Students will work together to solve difficult questions as a group and learn through teaching and helping each other.
Have the desks split in half when they get back from recess
Have the game name “Zeroni” big on the board and have game show music being played in the background
Have the students create their own team name
Have the winning team choose from 3 or 4 games to be played in gym class that week Materials
Game show music
Radio
Have math questions prepared
Have rules and game instructions on chart paper posted in the front of the class
Chart paper
Markers
Multiplication/ division/ addition/ subtraction flash cards Sample Word Problems for the game "The Great Zeroni"

1.Stanley left camp at 7:00 am to and Zero who was at the Wrecked Boat 21 miles away. What
time would it be when Stanley met Zero if he walked at 3 miles per hour?
A)12 noon B)2 pm C)4pm D)11 am Answer = B) 2pm

2.If it takes Stanley 4 hours to dig a hole, and it takes Zero 2 hours to dig a hole, what fraction of
a hole could the two of them dig in an hour working together?
A) 2/3 B) 1/5 C)1 D)¾ Answer: d) ¾

3.If a hole was dug 5 feet deep and 5 feet in diameter, what would be the volume of dirt
removed from the hole?
A)98.125 cubic feet B)18.15 cubic feet C)15.75 cubic feet D)20 cubic feet

4.Stanley and Zero picked 72 onions on Monday, 24 on Tuesday, 112 on Wednesday, and 44 on
Thursday. What was the average number of onions they picked on those four days?
A)107 B)252 C)63 D)45

5.It started raining on Sunday, July 8. It rained for forty days and nights. It began raining at 3 pm.
What time and day did the rain stop?
A)Saturday August 18 3am B)Thursday August 16 3pm C)Sunday August 19 3am D)Friday August 17 3pm LESSON 9: Rapid Writing (Language Arts)
Expectations

2.5 identify their point of view and other possible points of view; determine, when appropriate, if their own view is balanced and supported by the evidence; and adjust their thinking and
expression if appropriate (e.g., revise writing focusing on the use of inclusive language, such as
police officer instead of policeman)
4.1 identify a variety of strategies they used before, during, and after writing, explain which ones
were most helpful, and suggest further steps they can take to improve as writers
4.2 describe how their skills in listening, speaking, reading, viewing, and representing help in
their development as writers Teaching and Learning Strategies

Give the students a certain amount of time to ‘rapid’ write for a certain amount of time without stopping
Have the students complete a rapid writing session involving objects found in the novel
Example have on display preserved peaches, shovel, yellow spotted lizard etc.
The students then have to choose 3 objects they would like to write about describing its relevancy within the novel
This helps with writing fluency Materials

objects from the novel:
peach preserves
yellow spotted lizard
shovel
fish fossil
lipstick tube
running shoes
baseball cap
jail suite
sunflower seeds
onion
red nail polish
paper and pencils GRADE 6 UNIT PLAN LESSON 10: Character Study (Language Arts)
Expectations
Writing
1.4 Sort and classify information for their writing in a variety of ways that allow them to view information from different perspectives and make connections between ideas
1.5 Identify and order main ideas and supporting details and group them into units that could be used to develop a structured, multi-paragraph piece of writing, using a variety of strategies
2.2 Establish a distinctive voice in their writing appropriate to the subject and audience
2.8 Produce revised draft pieces of writing to meet identified criteria based on the expectations
3.4 Use punctuation appropriately to communicate their intended meaning in longer and more complex sentences, with a focus on the use of: commas etc.
3.7 Use a range of appropriate elements of effective presentation in the finished product, including print, script, different fronts, graphics, and layout Teaching and Learning Strategies

Students are to choose one main character from Holes and write a short character sketch. This short piece of writing should reveal or demonstrate something important about the character. Students are to think about the different characters in Holes. Some are likeable, and some are not so likeable. Students will choose one main character from Holes to diagram in the worksheet. Student's are expected to demonstrate an understanding of character traits as well as being able to recall facts and events from Holes, and evidence for certain character traits. Materials

Student worksheets
Writing journals
Pens
Holes book CPT
Teaching and Learning Strategies- Inventions and Their Creators

In Holes, Stanley’s father is trying to become rich by inventing a way to recycle old sneakers. Part A) Using a power point presentation and as a class, we will take a look at a number of inventions that were successful over time. With a partner, students will use the school library or the Internet to research these inventions.
Examples Include: Wright Brothers --> Airplanes
W.H Carrier --> Air conditioning
Alexander Graham Bell --> Telephone

Part B) After students have familiarized themselves with inventors they will either, on their own OR with a partner, come up with something they would like to invent. Students are to describe their invention. What does it do? How does it work? Remember, to be successful, an invention must be practical, useful and serve a specific purpose. In addition, students are to find a unique and creative way to advertise their invention. CPT
Expectations
Oral Communication:
2.1 Identify a variety of purposes for speaking and explain how the purpose and intended audience influence the choice of form
2.3 communicate orally in a clear. coherent manner, using appropriate organizing strategies and formats to link and sequence ideas and information
2.7 Use a variety of appropriate visual aids to support or enhance oral presentation
Writing
1.2 Generate ideas about a potential topic and identify those most appropriate for the purpose
1.3 Gather information to support ideas for writing, using a variety of strategies and a range of print and electronic resources
3.4 Use punctuation appropriately to communicate their intended meaning
3.5 Use parts of speech correctly to communicate their meaning clearly, with a focus on the use of: personal subject and object pronouns
Media Literacy
2.1 Describe in detail the main elements of some media forms
3.2 Identify an appropriate form to suit the specific purpose and audience for a media text they plan to create, and explain why it is an appropriate choice
3.4 Produce a variety of media texts for specific purposes and audiences, using appropriate form and techniques
Visual Arts
D1.1 Create a two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and multimedia art works that explore feelings, ideas, and issues from a variety of points of view CPT
Materials
materials
materials
materials Materials
Class time!
Computers
Paper, pencils, markers WEEK
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