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A Service-Learning/ Community Engaged Learning Workshop: A Different Way to Deliver Course Content

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Jodi Roth-Saks

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Transcript of A Service-Learning/ Community Engaged Learning Workshop: A Different Way to Deliver Course Content

A Service-Learning/Community Engaged Learning Workshop:
A Different Way to Deliver Course Content

II.
Service-Learning is Not...

Why not?
Internships/Practicum/Field Experience
Service-Learning
...necessarily volunteering, interning, participating in a community service project,
or completing field experience. These are all valuable forms of service,
but they are not always considered service-learning.
VIII.
What are the Benefits of Service-Learning?

Benefits to Faculty:
Enhanced opportunities for research and publication
More lively class discussions and increased student participation
Greater student retention of course material
Greater student awareness of community and "real world" issues
More innovative approaches to classroom instruction
Greater faculty awareness of community issues
Benefits to Community:
Access to university resources
Opportunities to foster positive relationship opportunities with the university
Awareness-building of community issues, agencies and constituents
Opportunities to contribute to the educational process
Short- and long-term solutions to pressing community needs
Benefits to Students:
Models of Service-Learning
Service-learning can take many forms, but most service-learning courses fit into the following categories:
III.
What Does Service-Learning
Look Like?

ENGLISH
In WRT120: Effective Writing students either mentor at-risk high school students or choose other service sites; observe, analyze discourse, and do oral and written reports based on their reflective practice.

Service-Learning can be connected to any curriculum. Here are just a few examples:
Dr. Linda Stevenson (Political Science) and Dr. Travis Ingersol (Social Work) collaborate on an Alternative Spring Break Trip where students learn about public health initiatives, while participating in a mural arts project in a Latino neighborhood in Philadelphia.
MULTIPLE CLASSES
COLLABORATING
Examples of Service-Learning
In Marketing 330: Customer Behavior students do online research about the agency and similar institutions, facilitate qualitative interviews and surveys to better understand consumers and then analyze, interpret, and develop marketing suggestions.
Discipline based
Problem- or Project-based
Capstone
Community-based action research
Discipline-Based
Students are expected to have a presence in the community throughout the semester and reflect on their experiences on a regular basis, using course content as a basis for their analysis and understanding
Problem- or Project-Based
Students (or teams of students) serve a community agency as consultants working for a client. Students work with community members to understand a particular
problem or need.
Capstone Service-Learning
Students draw upon the knowledge they have obtained throughout their academic career and combine it with relevant service work in the community.
Community-Based Action Research
Students, faculty and community members work together to design and implement a research project that addresses a community need. Focus is on community members finding solutions using information from the research.
Example: ENG/LAN 382 Teaching English Language Learners PK-12: Preservice teachers apply culturally responsive pedagogy and TESOL instructional strategies as they work with English language learners in K-12 schools.

Example: COM499 Intro to Social Media: Students in this Communications course create a social media campaign for a non-profit agency or governmental organization. Partner agencies have included: The Hickman and Bringing Hope Home.
GEOLOGY
MARKETING
Example: Psychology students collaborate with a shelter to survey community attitudes towards homelessness for a city-wide awareness campaign.
For more great examples of service-learning projects around the nation, click here:
Example: COM492 Capstone in Interpersonal/Intercultural Communication: Students work with one of six agencies to gain experience , link theory to practice, and enhance interpersonal and intercultural communication skills.
To view sample syllabi, click here:
Campus Compact:
http://www.compact.org/syllabi/
National Service-Learning Clearinghouse:
http://bit.ly/ih8V4I
Portland State University (video):
California State University (video):
http://bit.ly/eYRL6w
http://bit.ly/gwq0BL
Students studied the risk of sinkhole collapse for a residential community in Tredyffrin Township as part of the course final project. Groups of students evaluated specific geologic topics, then presented results during a seminar with the community members. Research finding were submitted to the Department of Environmental Protection as part of the site administrative record.
In NSG216 Healthy Aging students provide socialization, nutrition assessment, and sleep quality assessment to seniors at the West Chester Senior Center.
Volunteering & Community Service Projects
Are not tied to a course
These generally focus on benefits to community rather than student's learning
They do not always include structured reflection
Provide students with valuable work place skills, but if they do not integrate course content and service they are not Service-Learning
If they are only focused on benefits to the learner, but not the community; they are not Service-Learning
Need to include structured reflection in order to be Service-Learning
Integrates both course content and service experience
Allows students, faculty, community partners, and community members to all benefit from service experience
Offers an avenue for structured reflection so students can connect service experiences to course content
Which of the benefits of service-learning are most appealing to you? Why?


Which model do you think would best fit your service-learning course?


Stop & Write #5
Stop & Write #2
IV.
What are the Key Components
of Service-Learning?

Service-Learning Best Practices
Guiding Principles for Service-Learning
Preparation for the service addresses student training, clarification of responsibilities and expectations, and risk management issues.
Students are introduced to the partner agency before the service begins, and are given an orientation to the issues being addressed.
Academic credit is awarded for the learning gained from the experience, not for the service itself. Academic rigor is not compromised.
Reflection on the service experience is ongoing and includes dialogue about community issues, personal reflection, and the need in the community.
Students, faculty and community representatives participate in evaluating the service-learning experience.
Course includes structured reflection.
Course content and service experience are integrated.
Service experience meets a community need.
Relevant Service
Academic Material
Critical Reflection*
Service-Learning
Reflection is thinking about a service experience in order to connect the service experience and the course material. Although one can reflect alone, it is important to share perceptions with others who may have interpreted the experience very differently or made different connections. Learning comes through thinking about what we do, not by just doing, nor by just thinking.
Learn & Serve America: Service-Learning Clearinghouse:
Additional service-learning theory resources:
Community College National Center for Community Engagement:
Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning:
Effective service-learning is intentional and built into the course syllabus. Service is not a one-time experience or an "add-on", but is connected to course content throughout the semester.
Successful service-learning experiences address a genuine need in the community, not just the learning needs of the student. The service usually focuses on an underserved population.
Successful service-learning results when students connect the academic material, relevant service experience, and critical reflection to create a more enriching, engaging, and relevant learning experience.
Civic Responsibility
Service experience promotes sense of civic responsibility
Successful service-learning helps students to understand the value and relevance of service and the community issue their service addresses, and to become more engaged citizens in their community
To view sample service-learning syllabi, click here:
http://bit.ly/cYbVvs
http://bit.ly/cUb3hJ
http://bit.ly/caNXPp
http://bit.ly/aZ6hhs
Choose three "best practices" and describe how you would implement them in your course. For example: How would you plan to become acquainted with your community partner?


Stop & Write #3
IX.
Planning Service-Learning

During the Semester:
1. Explain service-learning: Help students understand the why, what, and how of service-learning.

2. Guide reflection: Don't "hope" students will make connections, take time to guide them. Create meaningful, structured critical thinking activities.
3. Monitor progress: Maintain regular contact with community partners.

4. Evaluate & assess: Offer students feedback, measure performance, and assess teaching effectiveness.
Before the Semester Begins:
1. Access staff support: Contact OSLVP staff with questions and for an explanation of services and resources available.
2. Review sample syllabi: Consider learning objectives for the service-learning activity, as well as possible service options.
3. Contact organizations: Discuss course goals and possible projects. Schedule regular contact with your community partners throughout the semester.
4. Design Course: Include reflection and assignments that help evaluate students' learning from the service. Adapt syllabus, assignments, lectures, and class discussions to include links between course theory and service experience.
Next Steps for Developing a
Service-Learning Course...

Contacts
&
References
Stop & Write #6
Write down any questions you would like to ask Service-Learning staff.



I. Service Learning is...

Students in a class using service-learning will participate in a service experience related to the course material.
Adapted from the National and Community Service Trust Act
How It Works
Service-Learning in Action:
Through assignments and class discussions, students critically reflect on the service in order to increase their understanding of course content, gain a broader appreciation of the discipline, and enhance their sense of civic responsibility.
Planning
Reflection
Implementation
Course syllabus is developed and revised to incorporate the service experience into the teaching and learning objectives of the course.
The faculty member becomes acquainted with mission, clientele, location, and student role for each community partner they will work with.
Academic service-learning is a teaching method that combines community service with curricular goals as it focuses on critical, reflective thinking, and civic responsibility.  Service-learning programs involve students in organized community service that addresses community needs, while developing their academic skills, sense of civic responsibility, and commitment to the community.

The service experience is connected to the course through reflective readings, projects, journals, and/or class presentations.
“Service learning is a form of experiential education, deeply rooted in cognitive and developmental psychology, pragmatic philosophy, and democratic theory. It shares a common intellectual history with organizational development and participatory action research".
Partner agencies define their needs and are included in planning for the service.
Reflection activities will help students think critically about course material, community issues, and their role as citizens.
The experiential learning model we know today has been shaped over time by:
"What is Service-Learning?"
Theoretical Foundations of Service-Learning
John Dewey

Kurt Lewin

Jean Piaget

David A. Kolb
Hands-on application that increases the relevance of academic knowledge
Accommodation of different learning styles
Interaction with people of diverse cultures and lifestyles
An increased sense of efficacy and social development
Practical career preparation
Meaningful involvement in the local community
Moral and ethical growth
Morton, K, & Troope, M. (1996). From the margin to the mainstream: Campus Compact's project on integrating service with academic study. Journal of Business Ethics, 15(1), 21-32.
Adapted from Heffernan, K. (2001). Implementation in fundamentals of service learning course construction. Providence, RI: Campus Compact.
Adapted from Eyler, J, & Giles Jr, DE. (1999). Where's the learning in service-learning?. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
Adapted from Bonar, L, Buchanan, R, Fisher, I, & Wechsler, A. (1996). Service-learning in the curriculum: a faculty guide to course development. Salt Lake City, UT: Lowell Bennion Community Service Center.
Benefits of Service-Learning
Service-Learning Continuum
The chart below offers another perspective on a continuum between volunteerism and internships.
Meredith College. (2005). Service learning as part of civic engagement: Faculty guide to service learning. Unpublished manuscript, Service Learning, Meredith College, Raleigh, NC. Retrieved from
http://www.meredith.edu/academics/servicelearning/facguide_final_draft-1.pdf
(Tanner, 2006)
"Dewey's theory of experiential education also is reflected in other critical service-learning components, such as the construction of learning outcomes, the use of group-based activities in the learning process, the use of "educative" rather than "miseducative" experiences, the reliance on the organic link between what is learned and personal experience, and opportunities for students to learn the value of altruism and personal responsibility."
Kraft, R. (1996). Service learning. ______________________, 28, 131-159.
Education & Urban Society
Tanner, K. (2006). Service learning: learning by doing and doing what matters. Informally published manuscript, Montana State University, Office for Community Involvement, Bozeman, MT. Retrieved from
http://www.montana.edu/teachlearn/Papers/Service%20learning.pdf
"Learning Objectives"
(1 minute)
"Reflection"
(2 minutes)
How would you explain the difference between service-learning and volunteering to a student?


Stop & Write #1
Additional Reading
"At A Glance: What We Know About The Effects of Service-Learning on College Students, Faculty, Institutions and Communities"
http://www.compact.org/wp-content/uploads/resources/downloads/aag.pdf
Additional Reading
"How Service Learning Affects Students"
http://www.gseis.ucla.edu/heri/PDFs/rhowas.pdf
(Boise State University, 2009)
http://bit.ly/twSbO9
(Boise State University, 2009)
http://bit.ly/s5cW18
Bonar, L, Buchanan, R, Fisher, I, & Wechsler, A. (1996). Service-learning in the curriculum: A faculty guide to course development. Salt Lake City, UT: Lowell Bennion Community Service Center.
Morton, K, & Troope, M. (1996). From the margin to the mainstream: Campus Compact's project on integrating service with academic study. Journal of Business Ethics, 15(1), 21-32.
Dewey, J. (1963). Experience and education. New York: Collier Books.
Kolb, D. A. (1984). Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs, N.J: Prentice-Hall.
Eyler, J, & Giles Jr, DE. (1999). Where's the learning in service-learning?. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
CSU Service-Learning Faculty Manual, Fourth Edition; courtesy, The Institute for Learning and Teaching at Colorado State University.
http://teaching.colostate.edu/guides/servicelearning/
Heffernan, K. (2001). Implementation in fundamentals of service learning course construction. Providence, RI: Campus Compact.
Meredith College. (2005). Service learning as part of civic engagement: Faculty guide to service learning. Informally published manuscript, Service Learning, Meredith College, Raleigh, NC. Retrieved from
http://www.meredith.edu/academics/servicelearning/facguide_final_draft-1.pdf
Tanner, K. (2006). Service learning: learning by doing and doing what matters. Informally published manuscript, Montana State University, Office for Community Involvement, Bozeman, MT. Retrieved from
http://www.montana.edu/teachlearn/Papers/Service%20learning.pdf
Boise State University Service-Learning Program. (2011). Planning to use service-learning: recommended steps. Retrieved from
http://servicelearning.boisestate.edu/faculty/planning.asp
Hurd, C. (2007). The CSU service-learning program's guiding principles. The Institute for Learning and Teaching, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. Retrieved from
http://teaching.colostate.edu/guides/servicelearning/principles_guidingprinciples.cfm
Lewis-Clark State College. (2009). Service-learning at lewis-clark state college. [Web]. Retrieved from
http://www.youtube.com/user/LCServiceCorps#p/a/u/1/Cmx4T0zDXzo
Additional Reading
References
Adapted under Creative Commons License from CSU Service-Learning Faculty Manual, Fourth Edition; courtesy, The Institute for Learning and Teaching at Colorado State University
http://bit.ly/tnZWGb
Additional Reading
"At A Glance: What We Know About The Effects of Service-Learning on College Students, Faculty, Institutions and Communities"
http://www.compact.org/wp-content/uploads/resources/downloads/aag.pdf
(Service-Learning at Boise State University,
Created by the Communications Department)
VII.
How to Integrate Reflection into Your Service-Learning Course.



Continuous reflection: Reflection should be an ongoing component in the learner's education, happening before, during, and after an experience.

Connected reflection: Link the "service" in the community with the structured "learning" in the classroom. Without structured reflection, students may fail to bridge the gap between the concrete service experience and the abstract issues discussed in class.

Challenging reflection: Instructors should be prepared to pose questions and ideas that are unfamiliar or even uncomfortable for consideration by the learner in a respectful atmosphere.

Contextualized reflection: Ensures that the reflection activities or topics are appropriate and meaningful in relation to the experiences of the students.
The Four C's of Reflection
Kolb, David. Experiential Learning Cycle chart further enhanced by Virginia Campus Outreach Opportunity League (COOL) in 1995.
What? So What? Now What?
What? - Students describe their service experience and observations. These reflections generally include phrases like "I did this...", "I worked with XYZ population", "I observed that...."

So What? - Students begin making concrete connections between the service experience and the course content. These reflections generally include phrases like, "My initial feelings were..." and "I can now see the connection between...."

Now What? - Students critically think about their experience and explore the changes they will make as a result of their newly gained knowledge. These reflections generally include phrases like, "Next time, I will..." and "This process would work better if...."

Journals: Writing in journals is widely used by service-learning programs to promote reflection. They're most meaningful when instructors pose key questions for analysis.
Multimedia Class Presentations: Students create a video or photo documentary on the community experience.
Theory Application Papers: Students select a major theory covered in the course and analyze its application to the experience in the community.
Agency Analysis Papers: Students identify organizational structure, culture and mission.
Presentations to Community Organizations: Students present work to community organization staff, board members, and participants.
Group Discussion: Through guided discussion questions, have students critically think about their service experiences.
Mapping: Create a visual map that shows how the service-learning experience connects to larger issues at the state/national/global level.
Letters-to-the Editor: Students write a letter-to-the-editor or to government officials that address issues important to the community organizations where they are working
Blog: Create a course blog where students can post comments on their experiences.
Reflective Reading: Find articles, stories, or songs that relate to the service experience and create discussion questions that link the reading to the service-learning.
Critical Thinking/Reflection Activities
If you have questions or would like assistance in developing a service-learning class, contact:

The Office of Service-Learning
and
Volunteer Programs

Service Learning Faculty Associate,
Sara Lamb Kistler: SLamb@wcupa.edu

Director of Service-Learning and Volunteer Programs, Jodi Roth-Saks: JRoth@wcupa.edu

(610) 436-3379
This presentation was adapted from "Welcome to Service-Learning!" a Prezi by:
Beth Ultis at Boise State University and Kelley Standal at University of Idaho.
West Chester University's Definition of Service-Learning, March 2013
The faculty member sets learning goals and objectives for students.

V. What are examples of SL Learning Outcomes?

Stop & Write #4
Academic Learning
Critical Thinking
Problem Solving
Learning how to learn
Community Learning
Inter/Intra Personal Learning

Opportunities
Complementary/Reciprocal Partnerships
Community and Students Overcome Stereotypes
Community/Economic Development
Capacity Building
Faculty Leadership, student leadership, community leadership
Challenges
Complexity of Education
Specialized institutions, governance, funding, hierarchies, institutional cultures
Autonomy
Planning Styles, leadership styles, vision/design
Power


Resources for Finding Partnerships
Office of Service-Learning and Volunteer Programs website
www.wcupa.edu/volunteer
Click on Faculty
Then click on "Agency Partner List"

Volunteer Match
Search by type of agency
http://www.volunteermatch.org

Pennsylvania 211 Southeast Region
www.sepa211.0rg
Click on "Search by Topics"
or create a log-in
VI. How do I Build Sustainable
Partnerships?

CSU Monterey Bay, Service Learning Institute
http://service.csumb.edu January 2011
Examples of SL Learning Outcomes
Areas to Consider:
Creating Partnership
Principles of Good Community-Campus Partnerships
Adapted from Learning Transformed a PA Campus Compact workshop, Dr. Char Gray May 2013
Community-Campus Partnerships for Health. (2006,October). Principles of Good Community-Campus Partnerships
Nursing
What kind of project might best fit the learning objectives for your course? Brainstorm at least two possible service-learning projects.
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