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Hurricane Katrina

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by

Macey Carroll

on 20 October 2015

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Transcript of Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Katrina
by: Mahalacey
Haley
Types of conditions there needs to be to make a hurricane similar to Katrina occur.
Hurricane Katrina
How does a hurricane form?
Preparing For A Hurricane
Make sure the storm has passed
Buy batteries for radios and flashlights
Stay indoors at all times
Stay away from windows
Find a closed space to hide (closet)
Evacuate if possible
By: Makayla
By: Macey
Hurricane Katrina VS Hurricane Andrew
Describing Hurricane Katrina
Both were a category 5 hurricane
first a hurricane starts off as a tropical storm but it devolpeds by being a low pressure system because of the warm waters surronding the tropical storm.
Wind Speed - highest 175 mph
Pressure - lowest 902 mb
Temperature - 80 degrees F
Storm Surge - high as 9 meters in some areas
Width - 400 miles
Category level - 5

Path: It started over the Bahamas and traveled through New Orleans, FL, the Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi.

Hurricane Katrina & Hurricane Andrew both affected Southern United States
By: Makayla
Devastation: Homes and businesses were completely destroyed, flooding occurred due to heavy precipitation. In all, it cost $100 billion in damage.
Then if there is a lot of moisture in the air it evaporates and rises as a large hot air mass then twist up into the atmosphere and turns into a hurricane.
What are currents, winds, air pressure?
Pressure/Intensity
both around 900 mb
Currents- a body of water or air moving in a certain direction.
Winds- the movement of the air, especially in the form of a current of air blowing from a certain direction.
Air Pressure- the force excerted onto a surface by the weight of the air.
Devastation
Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Andrew both had fatalities.
Makayla's Sources
http://m.livescience.com/22522-hurricane-katrina-facts.html
They both destroyed houses and had flooding.
Recovery Process
Hurricane Katrina and Andrew did a lot of damage. Both South Florida and New Orleans had a large amount to reconstruct.
They had to rebuild all the buildings that were destroyed. The people in Lousiana had to fix the levees that Katrina destroyed .
Temperature
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/weather/hurricane/sfl-hurricaneandrew04-photogallery.html
http://www.rtno.org/get-educated/hurricane-katrina/
Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Andrew both had warm temps, about 80 degrees F, like most hurricanes.
warm ocean waters at atleast 78 degrees F
at least 5° latitude from the equator
low vertical wind shear
moisture in the mid-troposhpere

unstable conditions

pre-existing disturbance
http://climate.ncsu.edu/climate/hurricanes/development.php
Source
Their Paths
Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Andrew's paths are similar because they both go through Florida, then the Gulf of Mexico, then they hit land (near the same area).
By: Makayla
By: Makayla
By: Makayla
By: Makayla
By: Makayla
By: Makayla
By: Makayla
My opinion is that there needs to be more than the listed circumstances to form a hurricane that causes as much damage as Katrina did to Louisiana. Hurricane Katrina was very strong and if a hurricane would hit North Carolina, it wouldn't go through the Gulf of Mexico to make it stronger.
Makayla, Haley, Leah and Macey
By: Macey
By: Macey
Hurricanes usually develop by being tropical storms. With high winds and thunderstorms.
Weather conditions that lead up to a hurricane
By: Macey
By: Macey
The path of a hurricane determines by the global winds and the hurricane moves its self by the prevailing winds
The path a hurricane moves
Tornadoes vs Hurricanes
By:Macey
Hurricanes and tornadoes are very different. Hurricanes are a lot bigger than tornadoes also, hurricanes can last up to a week and tornadoes last about 5 min
Thunderstorms vs hurricanes
Thunderstorms can form over land and water and hurricanes can only form over water also a thunderstorm is a short storm with heavy rain and winds while a hurricane is a long storm with heavy rain and strong winds
By: Macey
During Hurricane Katrina the current of the Atlantic Ocean were very strong. The were waves up to 70 ft high.
By: Leah and Macey
The winds during Hurricane Katrina were at a high of 140 mph and the low was 20 mph.The winds were very powerful they effected many people. For example the Johnsons, they got their house blown over by Hurricane Katrina in 2005.
The distruction from hurrican katrine was devasting. An estimed guess of the people that died was over 1,833 people. Millions of people lost there homes due to flooding.
The reason why people didnt evacuate during hurricane Katrina is becuase the state sent out the warning to late to where the hurricane was already occuring
Why Didnt people evacuate?
Currents
The people who went homeless went to the superdome. And this is when all the violence occured
Haley
By: Makayla
Macey Sources
http://www.hurricanescience.org/science/science/hurricanemovement/
Full transcript